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JC Bowman Commentary: The Role of a School Board

Tennessee Star
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Education is primarily a state and local responsibility in the United States. Most Tennesseans support local control of public education by the district board of education. This includes the autonomy of the local school district to adopt curriculum, assessments and programs to meet recognized educational goals and objectives. The most important role of a board of education is to hire its superintendent.

It is clear in the Tennessee Constitution that the responsibility for control and support of public schools is delegated in the Tennessee General Assembly, while in large measure the operation is entrusted to local school boards. The school board is the community’s watchdog on public education, thus ensuring that taxpayers get the most for their tax dollars. Taxpayers must hold school board members accountable for spending and results. School boards represent the public’s voice in public education.

Local school boards reflect the needs and aspirations of the communities as well as the interests and concerns of professional and nonprofessional employees. We believe non-partisan control is what is best for our communities. This is best ensured when educational policy is made by representatives vested in the community they live, and whose undivided attention and interests are devoted strictly to education of the children in that district. What we stress in a nutshell: Public education is a federal concern, a state responsibility, and a local operation.

State and federal education policies should be designed to assist local school districts in improving student achievement for all children and not be disguised as a means to label public schools as failures. Prior to any state or federal intervention based on a school’s or district’s failure to meet performance or accountability standards, governments should ensure that local schools and districts receive the necessary resources, support and time to improve. Tennessee, to its credit, has done a lot right in public education. However, no system is perfect.

The authority of the local school board is established in code, and this authority should not be delegated to others. Local boards of education must not relinquish their governance responsibilities in any situation, especially in management and oversight. We believe all children should have equal access to an education that maximizes his or her individual potential.

School boards are subject to the requirements of existing law are the governing and policymaking bodies for schools in their district. They should refrain from agreements that compromise their responsibility for representing general public interest in education. Local boards (should) know the unique and varied needs of their communities. They must also work with local governance to further the goals of the school district. Professional Educators of Tennessee are also glad to assist school board members when they reach out for assistance.

School boards must embody the community’s beliefs and values. School board members should be as diverse as the citizens they serve. We should thank the men and women who are serving our communities as school board members. They are too often unappreciated, and it is often a thankless but needed job.

Unfortunately, there are some people who end up on school boards who do not understand their unique role, and we should look at increased training to assist them in increasing their knowledge. The Tennessee School Board Association can play a significant function in that effort.

We should also encourage high character men and women in that want to serve the community to consider seeking a position on the school board. We need passionate people committed to children and those who teach them, looking out for each community’s interest. Are you ready to serve?

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JC Bowman is the Executive Director of Professional Educators of Tennessee, a non-partisan teacher association headquartered in Nashville, Tennessee. Follow him on Twitter @jcbowman. Permission to reprint in whole or in part is hereby granted, provided that the author and the association are properly cited.

 

 

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2 thoughts on “JC Bowman Commentary: The Role of a School Board

  1. Kendra Tilley

    First, education should not be the concern of the federal government. Our Constitution provides no authority whatsoever for education to the federal government. Secondly, the local school board has been pretty much rendered impotent for local education matters. DC drives the bus, the states follow DC orders and pass that on down to the local school board. How many times have parents heard the members of the school board address their concerns by saying they are doing as the law dictates they must. ESSA is the biggest lie to ever reach our states and EVERY Governor should refuse to follow this unconstitutional law which was sold under the pretense of local and state control. ESSA is even a bigger overreach of DC into education of all times. When the federal government has to approve our plan to implement ESSA that is not state or local control. We are told ESSA gets rid of Common Core but try to get an ESSA plan passed without standards aligned to Common Core. TN Commissioner of Education Candace McQueen lies to Tennesseans and tells them Common Core is gone in TN. Common Core is a copyrighted name and nothing more. We got rid of the name but the standards align to Common Core remain and it is easily proven. LIES and DECEIT is alive and well in education.

  2. 83ragtop50

    I appreciate the hard work and dedication of the majority of those serving on the local school boards. I believe that their hearts are in the right place – wanting the best education for the students they represent. However, I fear that the inbreeding of these members prevents the best results. By inbreeding I mean the overwhelming percentage of school board members whose only professional experience was gained in the classroom and in school administration. I believe that this lack of diversity in business experience results in to much thinking inside the box – and the box is a very small one. If one were cynical, one could say it is akin to the fox watching the hen house.

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