Commentary: Which One of the Spygate Rats Will Flip First?

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by CHQ Staff

 

The news that Attorney General William Barr has tasked Connecticut U.S. attorney John Durham to “examine the origins of the Russia investigation and determine if intelligence collection involving the Trump campaign was ‘lawful and appropriate.’”

According to reporting by Dan Bongino’s team, Durham has previously investigated corruption in law enforcement and the destruction of CIA videos. Perhaps Durham’s most notable case was his unraveling of the FBI corruption and cover-up involving mobster Whitey Bulger and the Boston FBI field office while Robert Mueller was FBI Director.

As Stephen Z. Nemo reported for Communities Digital News, Bulger, notorious head of Boston’s Winter Hill Gang, was allegedly a confidential informant for the FBI. But it turned out Boston-based Special Agent John Connolly Jr. was the one working for Bulger, not the other way around.

He and fellow FBI Special Agent John Morris, we now know, were hit men for Bulger’s gang, and Morris even once served as director of the FBI’s training facility at Quantico, VA.

Today, the guy Miami-Dade Circuit Court Judge Stanford Blake said had “crossed over to the dark side,” Connolly sits in a 10’ x 11’ prison cell in a Florida maximum-security facility, convicted of racketeering and murder.

The hero who exposed the corruption in the FBI’s Boston field office, bringing down its criminal agents, was Special Prosecutor John Durham, who serves today as a US Attorney in Connecticut and will be plumbing the depths of the origin of the Trump – Russia hoax.

Durham has been working on his review “for weeks,” a person familiar with the process told Fox News on Tuesday, to probe “all intelligence collection activities” related to the Trump campaign during the 2016 presidential election.

Durham, known as a “hard-charging, bulldog” prosecutor, according to a Fox News source, will focus on the period before Nov. 7, 2016—including the use and assignments of FBI informants, as well as alleged improper issuance of Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) warrants. Durham was asked to help Barr to “ensure that intelligence collection activities by the U.S. Government related to the Trump 2016 Presidential Campaign were lawful and appropriate.”

A source also told Fox News that Barr is working “collaboratively” on the investigation with FBI Director Chris Wray, CIA Director Gina Haspel, and Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats, and that Durham is also working directly with Justice Department Inspector General Michael Horowitz, who is currently reviewing allegations of misconduct in issuance of FISA warrants, and the role of FBI informants during the early stages of the investigation.

That would be in stark contrast to Robert Mueller’s “investigation” which studiously avoided any inquiry into the conduct of his friends and establishment institutions, like the FBI and Obama NSC, but went far afield looking at alleged misconduct by Trump’s one-time campaign manager Paul Manafort that was totally unrelated to alleged Russian interference in the 2016 election.

Nemo says John Durham’s inquiry into the weaponization of the FBI and other Deep State agencies against the 2016 Republican presidential campaign coincides nicely with that of Inspector General for the Justice Department, Michael Horowitz’ who is rumored to be taking a serious look at former FBI Director James Comey’s conduct.

His investigation into leaks by the fired FBI Director of classified information to The New York Times may send the former G-Man behind bars – to join jailbird and disgraced FBI Agent John Connolly, wrote Nemo.

Former Rep. Trey Gowdy said on Monday there is damning evidence out there for investigators to find as they examine the FBI’s conduct in the early stages of the Trump-Russia investigation.

“I can tell you it is even worse than what you described,” Gowdy told Sean Hannity. “It is what you described, in addition to the withholding of exculpatory information.”

Gowdy got even more specific when he made a plea: “To whoever is investigating this: Tell them to look for emails between Brennan and Comey in December 2016.”

(Why Gowdy did nothing with this when he had the power and Republicans had the House majority is a subject for another column.)

And while Comey and Brennan show no signs of remorse or cracking, the same can not be said of former FBI General Counsel James Baker.

According to The Washington Examiner’s Daniel Chaitin, former FBI General Counsel James Baker said on Monday he expects the Justice Department inspector general to find “mistakes” committed by the bureau in its handling of the Trump-Russia investigation.

Baker, who admitted last week the inspector general makes him “nervous,” said the government watchdog will probably find some errors reports Chaitin.

“The inspector general is looking at everything we did,” Baker said on CNN. “If the IG usually finds mistakes that we made, so I expect him to find mistakes this time.”

Baker said last week at an event in Washington, D.C., that he took a leading role in overseeing the FISA warrant applications to obtain the authority to spy on Page. Baker said on Monday he does not believe there was any intent from the people he worked with to do “anything wrong or illegal,” including politically motivated spying.

To us Baker sounds like an insider attempting to get out in front of a story he knows is going to go against him. And that begs the question, given U.S. attorney John Durham’s reputation for uncovering and prosecuting FBI corruption in the Bolger case, which one of the Spygate rats is going to flip first?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Reprinted with permission by ConservativeHQ.com

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2 Thoughts to “Commentary: Which One of the Spygate Rats Will Flip First?”

  1. Silence Dogood

    Lawyers are always the first to roll. Maybe Baker? Or Lisa Page?

  2. Dal ANDREW

    YES, the Spygate bus is starting to roll. It is axiomatic; the first rat on the bus gets the best seat. Who will that be?

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