Angie Craig Facing Criticism for Impeachment Comments

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Rep. Angie Craig (D-MN-02) hosted her fourth town hall last week and received several questions from constituents on moving forward with impeachment hearings against President Donald Trump.

Up until Tuesday’s town hall, Craig had taken a relatively moderate position on the issue of impeachment and believed it shouldn’t be discussed until Mueller completed his investigation.

“I believe the next step is for the Congress to request the unredacted version of the report. I believe the next step is for the committee chairmen to call a number of folks forward to testify, to fill in the facts for the American people,” Craig told her constituents Tuesday. “I am very troubled by the number of the potential areas of obstruction of justice that are mentioned in the report.”

Some took the comments to mean that Craig supports moving forward with the impeachment process, including the National Republican Congressional Committee.

“Yesterday Craig laid out for her constituents how exactly Congress should waste more of Minnesotans’ taxpayer money on baseless impeachment claims,” NRCC spokeswoman Carly Atchison said. “It is bizarre that Angie Craig now decides to pursue baseless impeachment, but regardless, she should stop peddling conspiracy theories and focus on Minnesotans.”

Former Congressman Jason Lewis, whom Craig unseated, addressed the comments in a tweet Monday afternoon.

“Should MN-02 be surprised? Angie Craig has long been from the far-left activist wing of the party and now that her support for impeachment, carbon taxes, bailing out big insurance, post-birth abortion come into view, second thoughts are kicking in,” Lewis said.

Minnesota’s congressional delegation has varied opinions on the subject of impeachment. Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-MN-05) has long been an advocate of impeachment hearings, while other more moderate members, such as Rep. Dean Phillips (D-MN-05), think it might be best to leave it up to the voters.

“I think ultimately it might be best to let 150 million Americans serve as judge and jury in November of 2020 with all the facts at that time,” Phillips told The Star Tribune.

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Photo “Angie Craig Town Hall” by Angie Craig.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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