Marsha Blackburn Fights for Pro-Life Law Out of Louisiana

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U.S. Republican Senators Marsha Blackburn of Tennessee and John Kennedy of Louisiana, along with U.S. House Republicans Steve Scalise (R-LA-01) and Mike Johnson (R-LA-04), are fighting on behalf of a pro-life law out of the Bayou State.

This, according to a press release Blackburn put out this week.

The four elected officials led 207 members of Congress in filing an amicus brief to stand up for Louisiana’s pro-life law before U.S. Supreme Court. The law requires all abortion providers have admitting privileges at local hospitals when emergencies arise.

“States reserve the right to protect mothers and their children with high standards for health care providers—and abortionists remain subject to such high standards,” Blackburn said in the press release.

“I hope the Supreme Court will issue a ruling that safeguards women’s health and that is consistent with the Constitution’s guarantee for states’ rights. In a year where the abortion movement has swept state legislatures to the extreme in states like New York and Virginia, it is important we defend the right of states like Louisiana to pass legislation to do the opposite and do more to protect the life of the unborn,” Blackburn said in the press release.

Kennedy, meanwhile, said U.S. Supreme Court justices will decide “whether abortion clinics should be required to maintain the same standards as any other outpatient surgical clinic.”

“The health and lives of these women are at stake. We aren’t asking abortion clinics to close down; we’re demanding they protect their patients by securing admitting privileges at nearby hospitals. It’s a common sense law, and we need to uphold this law which helps protect the lives of women and their unborn children.”

Scalise, meanwhile, said “innocent life must be protected at every stage.”

Johnson, in the press release said, this case is important for two reasons.

“It presents a key opportunity for the Supreme Court to affirm the right of states to enact common sense health and safety regulations to protect women in vulnerable situations,” the press release quoted Johnson as saying.

“The Court can also affirm Louisiana’s challenge to third-party standing, and ensure that future court challenges to abortion-related regulations cannot be brought by the notorious abortion industry that profits off substandard practices and dangerous clinic conditions. I’m proud to join with Rep. Scalise and my colleagues to assist in this landmark battle.”

June Medical Services, an abortion provider in Louisiana, filed suit challenging the constitutionality of a Louisiana law requiring all physicians performing abortions have admitting privileges within 30 miles of their abortion facility.

The Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals upheld Louisiana’s law, and now Americans United for Life, with the support of Members in Congress, has petitioned the U.S. Supreme Court to uphold this decision. Louisiana also filed a cross-petition challenging the ability of June Medical to seek the invalidation of health and safety regulations meant to protect Louisiana citizens from the very abortionists challenging the law.

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Chris Butler is an investigative journalist at The Tennessee Star. Follow Chris on Facebook. Email tips to [email protected]

 

 

 

 

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One Thought to “Marsha Blackburn Fights for Pro-Life Law Out of Louisiana”

  1. william r. delzell

    What you REALLY mean by “pro-life” is really pro-birth because once the baby is safely born unaborted, you leave the baby to shift for itself if its parents are poor or non-white. This type of negligence of the once-born child can be far worse than any abortion. Besides, abortion is a private matter between the pregnant woman and her docctor. If you so-called pro-lifers were really concerned about the new-born{s welfare, you would be supporting single payer affordable health care instead of favoring the C.E.O.’s of the health insurance companies and the church patriarchs who like to regulate peoples’ private life.

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