Ty Herndon and Kristen Chenoweth Release ‘Orphans of God’

When country crooner, Ty Herndon announced he was releasing a duet with the talented Tony Award Winner, Kristen Chenoweth, I wanted to find out how this came to be.

With Herndon, he grew up singing from a young age and never really had a choice. He comes from a musical family and they traveled the south singing at camp meetings and tent revivals. He even considered being an evangelist at one point. His family listened to the Grand Ole’ Opry and singers like Tammy Wynette.

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Kentucky AG Files Restraining Order to Block Religious School Closures

“Kentucky’s attorney general is suing his own governor in an attempt to keep private religious schools open, despite the state ordering virtual classes during the coronavirus pandemic, “according to Fox News.

Attorney General Daniel Cameron and the First Liberty Institute on Friday asked a federal court to issue a temporary restraining order that would block Beshear’s order from being implemented. An emergency hearing took place on Monday. In the petition, Cameron argued that Beshear’s latest executive order infringed on Danville Christian Academy’s and other religious schools’ constitutional freedoms.

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Debbie Dooley Commentary: Georgia Secretary of State Raffensperger Ignores Georgia Law and Cowers to Stacey Abrams and Democrats

Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger ignited a firestorm when he announced in March of this year that he was appeasing Stacey Abrams and Georgia Democrats by sending out absentee ballot requests to 6.9 million active registered Georgia voters during the Primary elections.   Georgia conservatives were outraged he was doing this because of the potential for rampant voter fraud involved with absentee ballots.  Voters over 65 could request general election ballots when they requested their primary ballot.

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Two Moves Trump HHS Is Taking to Make Government More Accountable

In another Trump administration move to boost transparency and roll back regulations, the Department of Health and Human Services issued two statements of policy on Tuesday that will affect any future imposition of regulations going forward. 

The first policy requires the department and its agencies to demonstrate to the public how they reached a conclusion on the economic cost of a regulation. 

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Nashville Has Arrested 11 Hosts of Large Home Parties During Pandemic, Tennessean Says

Under emergency health orders, Nashville police have arrested 47 people as of mid-November, including 11 accused of hosting large gatherings, The Tennessean newspaper said.

The newspaper said it based its report on its research of court documents and other data. Reportedly, 79 percent were in violation of Metro Health orders by failing to wear a mask in public. Some of the hosts allegedly held house parties of up to 600 people at a time, according to police, which could result in up to a year in jail and a $2,500 fine.

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Marketing Guru and California Refugee Craig Huey Discusses His Business of The Huey Report, Reality Alert, and JudgeVoterGuide.com

Tuesday morning on the Tennessee Star Report, host Michael Patrick Leahy welcomed marketing guru and California refugee Craig Huey to the studio to discuss his multiple business ventures.

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California Refugee Craig Huey Explains Why He Fled to Find a New Home in Tennessee

Tuesday morning on the Tennessee Star Report, host Michael Patrick Leahy welcomed Craig Huey to the studio to discuss his motivation for leaving behind Califonia and taking root in Tennessee.

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Craig Huey of The Huey Report Discusses Why He Left California and the Anti-Business Climate in the State

Tuesday morning on the Tennessee Star Report, host Michael Patrick Leahy welcomed entrepreneur and the creator of The Huey Report, Craig Huey to the studio to explain his reason for moving and the differences between Tennessee and California’s business environments.

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83 Percent Increase in Middle and High School Students Earning ‘F’ Grades in at Least Two Classes in Fairfax

A Fairfax County Public Schools (FCPS) study found an 83 percent increase in middle and high school students earning ‘F’ grades in two or more classes. The study compared Quarter One 2020-2021 results to Quarter One 2019-2020, and coincided with COVID-19 virtual learning. Last school year, six percent of the students earned ‘F’ grades in two or more classes; that increased to 11 percent in the latest results.

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Tim Anderson Announces Run for Virginia House of Delegates

Prominent Virginia Beach lawyer Tim Anderson is running for the House of Delegates 83rd District as a Republican candidate.

Anderson, who is already involved with GOP state politics, officially announced his campaign on Tuesday through a press release posted to his Twitter and Facebook profiles.

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College Basketball Games to Watch Over Thanksgiving Holiday

It has been exactly 258 days since conference tournaments around the country were cancelled thanks to the coronavirus, but now fans can rejoice because college basketball is officially back. 

After what feels like an eternal break from the sport, Wednesday marks the start of the season and features a slate of games from morning to night for what will essentially be non-stop action all day long.

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No Word from Governor Kemp as State Legislators Demand Special Session

State legislators continue to push for Governor Brian Kemp or the General Assembly to call a special legislative session before the January runoff election. 

State Senators Brandon Beach (R-GA-Alpharetta), Greg Dolezal (R-GA-Cumming), William Ligon (R-GA-Brunswick), and Burt Jones (R-GA-Jackson) submitted a letter to Kemp on Tuesday.

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Judge Rules Minneapolis Residents Have Standing to Sue Over Police Reduction

Minneapolis residents have standing to sue the city over an alleged police staffing violation, Hennepin County District Court Judge Jamie Anderson has ruled. 

Anderson’s order rejected the city of Minneapolis’ attempt to throw out the lawsuit because the city said residents lacked standing to sue.

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Georgia Begins Second Recount – No Audit of Absentee Ballot Signatures

Georgia initiated its second recount Tuesday of the votes cast in the general election. During this recount, the votes will be processed electronically rather than hand-counted – but there will be no audit of absentee ballot signatures.

In a virtual press conference, Georgia Secretary of State Voting Systems Manager Gabriel Sterling asserted that their office would continue to “follow the law” for this recount. He explained that no state law exists requiring or outlining signature matching after initial confirmation upon receipt of the ballot. That, and workers separate ballots from their signed envelopes to protect ballot secrecy.

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State Election Board Votes to Extend Drop Box Use and Mandate Early Processing for Absentee Ballots for Runoff Senate Election

The Georgia State Election Board voted to extend the absentee ballot voting rules on the use of drop boxes and early processing. Leading up to the January 5 general election runoff, voters may continue to deliver their absentee ballots at drop boxes and officials must begin processing ballots at minimum a week before Election Day.

Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger chaired Monday’s meeting. The board gathered to discuss three emergency rules set to expire prior to the runoff election, though they opted to only address the first two on their agenda.

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Things to Do in Richmond This Thanksgiving Weekend

COVID-19 and Governor Ralph Northam’s executive orders make it more difficult to enjoy the holidays, but Richmond still has plenty of activities to offer this weekend. Enjoy historical experiences, tour the city by bike, or volunteer to help feed others this Thanksgiving.

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Ohio Governor DeWine Calls Special Presser to Talk State Hospital Capacity

Ohio Governor Mike DeWine called a special briefing Monday to update Ohioans on the record number of COVID hospital admissions statewide. He was joined by members of the Ohio Hospital Association – Robert Wyllie, Cleveland Clinic; Andrew Thomas, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center; Richard Lofgren, UC Health; Ronda Lehman, Mercy Health.

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Blount County Mayor Shares Comparison of Mask and No-Mask Counties in Tennessee

Mayor of Blount County Ed Mitchell took to Facebook last week sharing a comparison of how Tennessee counties have fared under mask and no-mask mandates.

Blount County, which is not under a mask mandate by Mitchell, has Maryville as its county seat and largest city.  It lies in Tennessee’s eastern grand division adjacent to Knox and Sevier counties, both of which have mask mandates in place.

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Victor Davis Hanson Commentary: A Time of Chaos Upon Chaos Atop Chaos

America will weather its current hysterias.

But the tensions and furor are reminiscent of the last generations of the Roman Republic. In its last century, Romans began to adjudicate politics by obsequious partisan town criers (their version of our media), mass demonstrations, and freelance street gangs. Looters, arsonists, and demonstrators did pretty much as they pleased in the streets of Rome without fear of legal consequences.

In our time, the media has now vanished – kaput, no more, ended.

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Carol Swain Says Williamson County Risks Increasing Racial Tension with Cultural Competency Program

Members of the Williamson County School System are reportedly looking to implement a cultural competency program, but former Nashville mayoral candidate Carol Swain said it will likely divide different categories of people even further.

The Nashville-based FOX 17 reported last week that Williamson County School System Superintendent Jason Golden wants a cultural strategy program.

But Swain told The Tennessee Star Monday that Golden and school board members need to ponder what, exactly, they want to accomplish.

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Metro Nashville Schools Sending All Students to Distance-Learning After Thanksgiving

Citing the “the alarming increase in the spread of COVID-19,” Metro Nashville Public Schools will move all students to distance-learning after the Thanksgiving break.

The district on Monday evening tweeted, “Metro Schools is returning to all-virtual learning following the Thanksgiving break on November 30 through the end of the semester, December 17.”

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‘Not Interfering with People’s Thanksgiving Dinners’: New Jersey Police Chief Vows to Limit Enforcement of Governor’s COVID-19 Orders

by Jake Dima   A New Jersey police chief vowed to limit enforcement of a recent string of coronavirus orders from Democratic Gov. Phil Murphy ahead of Thanksgiving. Howell Township Police Chief Andrew Kudrick Jr. said he would rely primarily on community judgment rather than law enforcement intervention in response…

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UVA Student Newspaper Opinion Writer: ‘Stand Up’ to ‘Racist Family’ at Thanksgiving

An opinion columnist at the University of Virginia’s student newspaper encouraged her readers to “stand up” to “racist family” at Thanksgiving.

Emma Camp, who writes a regular opinion column for the Cavalier Daily, asserted that “white progressives must privilege their principles over personal comfort” in conversations with family during the holiday season. In order to fulfill this mandate, they “need to stand up to their racist loved ones.”

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Harvard Creating New ‘Antiracism’ Librarian Job That Pays up to $240,300 Per Year

Harvard University is creating a new position for its Ivy League campus: an “Associate University Librarian for Antiracism.”

The salary grade (061) for the position is listed between $133,300 to $240,300 per year.

The ideal candidate will have at least 10 years of experience and demonstrate strong data analysis, leadership and administrative skills, according to Harvard officials.

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Crom Carmichael Weighs in on Tenney-Brindisi Race and Notes Big Change in the Republican Party

Monday morning on the Tennessee Star Report, host Michael Patrick Leahy welcomed all-star panelist Crom Carmichael to weigh in on the ongoing Upstate New York House race and how the Republican Party will be very different.

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Nevada Governor Orders Indoor Mask Mandate, Limits Private Gatherings Ahead of Thanksgiving

Democratic Nevada Gov. Steve Sisolak on Sunday strengthened the state’s mask mandate and limited attendees in private gatherings ahead of Thanksgiving.

Residents must wear face coverings whether gathering indoors or outside if any member that’s not in their household is present, according to a press release from the governor’s office. Private gatherings are limited to 10 people from a maximum of two separate households and public events will be capped at 50 people or 25% capacity, whichever is less, the order, which will last a total of three weeks, read.

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NCAA Relocating Preliminary Round Sites for 2021 Championship Tournament, Discussing Single Host City

Many die-hard college basketball fans remember the disappointment they felt last spring when the 2020 NCAA Tournament was cancelled because the coronavirus that was, at the time, starting to emerge in the United States.

For 2021, all signs are pointing to March Madness taking place even while the country continues to live through the pandemic, but the annual spring tradition for college basketball fans will look much different from years past.

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Biden’s Pick for National Security Adviser Sent Classified Emails on Clinton’s Server, Hyped Fake Trump-Russia Collusion Story

Joe Biden’s likely choice for national security adviser sent more than 200 classified emails found on Hillary Clinton’s private email network, and touted a now-debunked allegation before the 2016 election which fueled the conspiracy theory that Donald Trump was in cahoots with Russian leaders.

Biden will select Jake Sullivan to serve in the White House role, The New York Times and Bloomberg reported.

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Host Leahy and Carmichael Reflect on JFK’s Presidency 57 Years After His Death

Monday morning on the Tennessee Star Report, host Michael Patrick Leahy welcomed the original all-star panelist Crom Carmichael to the studio to discuss past presidential moral dilemmas and their impact on foreign policy.

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COVID-19 Vaccine Temperature Requirements Could Create Logistics Challenge

Many states in the U.S. are hinging their COVID-19 mitigation strategies on the availability of a widely available vaccine. An issue bound to arise is the extremely cold temperatures the most promising experimental vaccines need to be kept at and the logistics of delivering them across the country. 

Moderna’s COVID-19 vaccine is estimated to remain stable at standard refrigerator temperatures of 36° to 46°F for 30 days. Longer storage means a required temperature of mRNA-1273 needs -4°F for up to six months. 

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Faith and Freedom Rally Protests Mayor Cooper Rule of 8: ‘Make America Godly Again’

Monday afternoon in downtown Nashville, a rally of just over 100 people protested the latest gathering limit from Mayor John Cooper. None of the police were present at the Legislative Plaza steps where everyone gathered.

Cooper coined the term “Rule of 8” for the city’s latest pandemic-related order ahead of Thanksgiving. The event description on Facebook described the rule as “ridiculous and unconstitutional.”

Pastor Greg Locke hosted the protest. Locke announced the event during the third “Stop the Steal” rally last Saturday – Trump supporters have pledged to gather every weekend until the general election lawsuits are resolved.

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Sidney Powell Makes Explosive Allegations About Dominion; Firm Won $107 Million Contract with State of Georgia Months After Former Staffer for Gov. Kemp Signed on as Lobbyist

At the center of the pending lawsuits surrounding this general election is the integrity of electronic voting systems and the companies that own them. One company of particular interest is Dominion Voting Systems (Dominion), referenced by attorney Sidney Powell in multiple press conferences and interviews.

Powell has claimed that Dominion is responsible for switching, losing, and assigning different weights to votes. The attorney has also claimed that those who awarded contracts to Dominion did so for sweetened deals: guaranteed increased power and massive payouts. Powell further alleged that Dominion’s software and executives have ties to Venezuela and the late Hugo Chavez.

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Leftists Giddy That Georgia U.S. Senate Race Might Deliver ‘The Green New Deal’

Members of a left-leaning environmental group have announced that Georgia’s two U.S. Senate races are the key to them and their political allies in Washington, D.C. enacting the Green New Deal into law.

Members of this group, the Sunrise Movement, announced their intentions late last week.

According to an emailed Sunrise Movement newsletter, members think they can use the Georgia U.S. Senate elections “to transform this country.” The newsletter did not identify which of the four primary U.S. Senate candidates would help them achieve their goals. The Green New Deal, however, is a Democratic Party initiative.

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As Gov. DeWine Vows to Veto Ohio Bill to Limit Director of Health’s Authority, Lawmakers Eye Override

Senate Bill 311 (SB311), a bill to limit the Director of Health order-issuing authority, will be vetoed by Ohio Republican Governor Mike DeWine.  The Governor has 10 days with which to exercise that right – speculation is he will take all 10.

However, SB311 is not dead.

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Ohio Governor Sees Growing Criticism from Fellow Republicans

For months, Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine steered cleared of publicly second-guessing President Donald Trump, a fellow Republican, despite their differences in responding to the coronavirus pandemic.

However, following the governor’s move to shutdown the state over rising COVID cases and remarks urging a swift conclusion to the challenges to the 2020 election irregularities, President Trump suggested another Republican should challenge him in Ohio’s 2022 election.

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Follow the Money: CARES Act Update

Congress passed the CARES Act last March, sending many taxpayers $1,200, giving $100 billion to health providers, and boosting unemployment benefits by $600 a week, according to Govtrack. The $2 trillion stimulus bill also sent $150 billion to states and localities across the country. Virginia received about $3.1 billion dollars, with a separate $200 million sent directly to Fairfax County.

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Minneapolis Park Board Repeals Nudity Ordinance

The Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board unanimously voted in favor of repealing its Proper Attire Required ordinance (PB 2-21) during a Wednesday meeting. This discussion had been tabled from a July 16 Park Board meeting.

The conversation about the nudity ordinance was prompted by an incident of alleged public nudity in July at a Golden Valley beach and the subsequent media response.

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Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger Silent on Demands He Audit Absentee Ballots

Members of the State Executive Committee of the Georgia Republican Party have asked Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger to order an immediate audit of the absentee ballots cast in the 2020 general election.

This audit, members of the Georgia GOP said in an open letter, must verify that signatures match.

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Lynchburg-Area Counties Considering ‘No Shutdown’ Resolution

A resolution to block Governor Ralph Northam’s COVID-19 shutdown executive orders is circulating in the counties around Lynchburg. According to reporting by WSET, Boards of Supervisors in Campbell, Bedford, and Appomattox Counties are considering drafting a resolution repudiating Northam’s interference in local business.

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Senator Amanda Chase says the Democratic Party of Virginia is Racist

State Senator Amanda Chase (R-Chesterfield), a Republican gubernatorial candidate for 2021, called the Democratic Party of Virginia racist and said that the group hates white people.

On Friday night, Chase posted the statement to her Facebook page in response to an article about Virginia Democrats calling for Richmond General Registrar J. Kirk Showalter to either be removed from the position or to resign on her own.

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Michigan Board of Canvassers Certify Statewide Election Results

The Michigan State Board of Canvassers on Monday voted to certify the Nov. 3 election results on a 3-0 vote with one member abstaining.

Republican board member Aaron Van Langevelde voted with Democrats.

“I’ve reviewed every section. I haven’t found anything about an audit,” Van Langevelde said. “I found nothing about authority for us to delay certification because we’re waiting for more accurate results. I found nothing about making certification contingent on an audit. I found nothing that gives us the authority to review complaints for fraud.”

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Michigan’s EGLE Denies Conservation Group’s Challenge to Nestlé Water Withdrawal Permit

The Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy dismissed a case challenging the department’s issuance of a permit to increase water withdrawals by Nestlé Waters North America (NWNA) in Osceola County.

EGLE announced on Friday it would dismiss the case, which was filed in 2018 by the Michigan Citizens for Water Conservation (MCWC) and the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians. An EGLE statement stated the groups “erred in not appealing the permit directly to circuit court.”

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Ohio AG Yost Files Suspension Proceedings Against Cincinnati Councilman Sittenfeld

Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost initiated suspension proceedings against Cincinnati City Councilman P.J. Sittenfeld on Monday amid allegations of corruption.

Sittenfeld has been accused of accepting $40,000 in bribes and was charged with two counts each of honest services wire fraud, bribery and attempted extortion, NBC News reported.

Sittenfeld has denied the claims, saying that he is “innocent” and that the allegations are “simply not true.”

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Knox County Not ‘Following the Science’ in Limiting Restaurant Business, UTK Law Professor Glenn Reynolds Says

University of Tennessee at Knoxville Law Professor Glenn Reynolds is calling out the Metro Nashville Department of Health’s claims over COVID-19 closures, saying they are “not following the science.”

Starting Monday, Nov. 30, Nashville will limit bars and restaurants to 50 percent capacity, NewsChannel 5 reported Monday. They must operate at half capacity with 6 feet of social distancing for a maximum of 100 customers per floor, whichever is less.

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Tennessee’s Year-to-Date Budget Surplus is Up to $447 Million

Three months into the 2020-2021 fiscal year, Tennessee’s actual revenues have exceeded the budget to create a $447 million surplus.

The surplus represents revenues that are 13 percent over and above the budgeted revenues through October and the fourth month in a row of budget surpluses.

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