Bill Proposes Easing Licensing Burden on Tennessee Professionals

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One legislator wants to alleviate the burdens for individuals to obtain any licenses required by their profession or occupation. The bill, called the “Licensing Independence for Future Tennesseans Act,” or “LIFT Act,” would allow licensing authorities to issue licenses to those licensed previously. The act would create addendums within Title 62 and Title 63 of the Tennessee Code.

Specifically, the LIFT Act would require licensing authorities to issue licenses to an individual if they already have a similar license in another state for at least one year, haven’t had their license revoked or surrendered, don’t have unresolved disciplinary issues or pending investigations with other licensing authorities, and don’t have any disqualifying criminal history.

Representative Mark Hall (R-Cleveland) introduced the LIFT Act last week, and it was quickly passed on first consideration. The act is awaiting committee assignment.

Hall’s spokespersons didn’t respond to a request for comment by press time.

Currently, Tennessee laws on renewing professional licenses address licensing agencies’ transparency on issues such as fees and renewal deadlines and membership requirements. The laws also address a wide variety of licensing requirements for the medical professions, such as dentists and nurses.

The Tennessee Star reported last month about one Nashville attorney whose licenses was suspended for offering advice on how to get away with murder – an attempt at sarcasm and dark humor, he contended. The LIFT Act wouldn’t apply to the attorney’s case, however, since the provision concerning the qualifications and admissions to practice for attorneys is addressed in a separate part of the code, Title 23.

Another set of protections for individuals in the Tennessee Code, called the Freedom to Prosper Act, prevents any political subdivisions from imposing additional licensing requirements, or  expanding or increasing licensing requirements. The exception to the rule are those classified as first responders, such as law enforcement, firefighters, and emergency medical and rescue management.

The state currently offers a consolidated access point for all licensing information, registration, and renewal needs on one page.

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Corinne Murdock is a reporter at The Tennessee Star and the Star News Network. Follow her latest on Twitter, or email tips to [email protected].

 

 

 

 

 

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