Judge Temporarily Blocks Biden Vaccine Mandate for Private Firms After Texas Sues

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton on Saturday revealed that a federal court had issued a temporary block against the Biden administration’s vaccine mandate against private companies after the state brought suit against it.

Paxton revealed the development on his Twitter accounts. “Yesterday, I sued the Biden Admin over its unlawful OSHA vax mandate,” he wrote. “WE WON. Just this morning, citing ‘grave statutory and constitutional issues,’ the 5th Circuit stayed the mandate.

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Brnovich Leads 11 States Suing Biden Administration over Vaccine Mandate for Private Businesses

Mark Brnovich

Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich, who was the first person in the country to sue the Biden administration over its COVID-19 vaccine mandates, is now co-leading another lawsuit with 11 other attorneys general over another aspect of the mandates. This new lawsuit challenges the mandate for private businesses with over 100 employees. 

His first lawsuit, filed on September 14, primarily challenged the mandate’s applicability to federal employees and contractors. Brnovich and 23 other attorneys general next warned the Biden administration in a letter on September 16 that a new lawsuit was coming if the mandate wasn’t reversed. On October 22, Brnovich filed a request for an emergency temporary restraining order to stop the mandate from going into effect.

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Tennessee Attorney General Joins Other States, Challenges Joe Biden’s COVID-19 Vaccine Mandate for Private Sector Employees

Tennessee Attorney General Herb Slatery and six other state attorneys general have filed a petition before a federal court challenging the Biden Administration’s COVID-19 vaccine mandate for private sector employees. This, according to a press release that members of Slatery’s staff emailed Friday.

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Commentary: McAuliffe’s Defeat Shows Abortion Extremism Doesn’t Win

Terry McAuliffe

I woke up Wednesday morning so grateful that my state, Virginia, had voted out abortion extremism. Abortion activists were supposed to sweep Terry McAuliffe back to the governor’s mansion. McAuliffe spent millions of dollars on ads blasting Glenn Youngkin for being pro-life and brought in outside speakers, including former President Obama, to campaign on the issue of abortion. Instead of keeping Virginia blue, these efforts may have propelled Youngkin to victory. The 5% of voters who said abortion was their top issue in the 2021 election backed Youngkin by a 12-percentage-point margin. 

Some policy analysts seem shocked by how abortion radicalism blew up in McAuliffe’s face, but they shouldn’t be. More than three quarters of the American people support significant restrictions on abortion and are making their voices heard at the polls. Instead of listening to them, McAuliffe pandered to an extreme base that makes up a tiny portion of the electorate. 

Protecting the most vulnerable is a winning issue, it should be a bipartisan issue, and Youngkin’s success paves the way for a wave of pro-life candidates in 2022 to win in purple and blue states by calling out the extreme pro-abortion views of their opponents. 

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Goo Goo Clusters Reopens After $2 Million Renovation

Nashville’s Goo Goo Clusters reopened its 3rd Ave location after a $2 million renovation. The renovation took a few months for the company, Vice President of Sales and Marketing, Beth Sachan told Fox News 17.

Now dubbed the Goo Goo Chocolate Co., she said that “we put a lot of thought into designing this space, we opened this store in 2014, and obviously, just kind of opened as a retail store, to sell our candy and sell some merchandise, and we learned quickly over time that people wanted more, they wanted to learn more about what a Goo Goo Cluster was.”

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Racine County Sheriff Refers Election Fraud Charges for State Elections Commissioners to County District Attorney’s Office

Wisconsin’s Democrat Governor Tony Evers said on Tuesday that Racine County officials should file charges if they believe election laws were broken at a Racine nursing home. “It’s pretty simple,” Evers said during a news conference in Madison. “It’s not something that should be made more complex by the politics. Somebody screwed up, they should be prosecuted. Simple as that.”

The Racine County Sheriff on Wednesday decided to take the governor’s suggestion to heart, and sent a felony criminal referral for members of the Wisconsin Election Commission (WEC) to prosecutor’s office.

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Border Patrol: 27 Percent of Migrants Arrested at Border Are Repeat Offenders, Many with Other Criminal Convictions

Federal law enforcement officers arrested more than 17,300 migrants with past convictions of other crimes attempting to cross the border illegally last fiscal year. That’s up from 9,447 in fiscal 2020.

The federal government’s fiscal year runs from Oct. 1 through Sept. 30.

An additional 8,979 in fiscal 2021 were of migrants with outstanding arrest warrants against them from other law enforcement agencies.

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Music Spotlight: Abby Anderson

NASHVILLE, Tennessee – When I saw Abby Anderson open for Radio Romance and Midland in 2017, I immediately knew that I wanted to interview her even though I had recently started writing my column.

Fast forward 4 years when I got an email stating that Anderson was releasing a powerful new anthem, and finally I got the privilege to interview the effervescent songstress.

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NYC Public Schools Plan to Give COVID-19 Shots to Elementary Students

New York City Public Schools will administer COVID-19 vaccinations to elementary students at one-day vaccine clinics at school sites starting next week, following federal approval of the vaccine for 5-to-11-year-old students, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced Wednesday.

All students five and older can receive the first dose of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine for free at 1,070 school sites across the city starting Monday, Nov. 8. City-run vaccination sites in the city will begin vaccinating 5-to-11-year-olds starting Thursday.

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House Speaker Cameron Sexton Answers Questions on Occupational Safety and Health Administration, Omnibus, and Ford

Friday morning on the Tennessee Star Report, host Michael Patrick Leahy welcomed Tennessee Speaker of the House Cameron Sexton to the newsmakers line to weigh in on OSHA vaccine mandate and its relation to the Omnibus Bill from last weeks special session in the General Assembly.

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Commentary: Our Vaccine Status Is None of Their Business

Vaccination card

I stand with all my fellow Americans—both vaccinated and unvaccinated. And because I do, I recently refused to disclose my vaccination status. And you should, too.

I was invited to speak at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth School of Law about the many public and private mandates enacted, supposedly, to address COVID-19—all of which I oppose. I view vaccine mandates, for example, as the most totalitarian commands we have seen in this country since the days of eugenics-based forced sterilization—leading science, at the time.

Ironically, one week before my scheduled speech, I was told that school bureaucrats mandated off-campus visitors like me confirm they are vaccinated. Many will say that sharing this private health information is a minor intrusion with little downside. I think that’s a mistake.

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Witness: First Man Shot by Kyle Rittenhouse Tried to Take His Rifle

In the trial of Kenosha teenager Kyle Rittenhouse, new witness testimony reveals that Rittenhouse shot the first of three men in self-defense when the attacker lunged for his rifle in an attempt to take it from him, as reported by Fox News.

This account was given by Daily Caller reporter Richie McGinniss, who filmed part of the altercation on his cell phone. McGinniss said that the man in question, Joseph Rosenbaum, was actively chasing the armed Rittenhouse and, upon getting close to him, lunged for his weapon.

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Texas Sen. Cruz Introduces Bill Prohibiting Vaccine Mandate for Minors

Ted Cruz

U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, a member of the Senate Judiciary Committee, introduced legislation that would prohibit the federal government and any entity at the federal, state and local level that receives federal funding, including school districts, from requiring COVID-19 vaccines for minors.

“Parents should have the right to decide what is best for their children in consultation with their family doctor,” he said. “My view on the COVID-19 vaccine has remained clear: no mandates of any kind.

“President [Joe] Biden and his administration have repeatedly ignored medical privacy rights and personal liberty by pushing unlawful and burdensome vaccine mandates on American businesses, and now they are preparing to push a mandate on kids by pressuring parents – all without taking into account relative risk or the benefits of natural immunity.”

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Justice Department Sues Texas over New Election Law

The Department of Justice filed a complaint against Texas on Thursday, alleging certain provisions in the state’s new election law violated federal voting legislation.

The complaint alleged that certain provisions in Texas’ new election law, known as SB 1, violate Section 208 of the Voting Rights Act by denying voters, especially those with disabilities, “meaningful assistance” in the poll booth. The complaint also alleged that Texas’ law requiring the rejecting of ballots with certain errors that the DOJ claims are inconsequential violates the Civil Rights Act.

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Fighting Climate Change Would Cost More Than Global GDP, Treasury Secretary Says

Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen estimated that the world would need to devote $100-150 trillion, more than the entire world’s annual gross domestic product, to fighting climate change over the next three decades.

Yellen signaled that the world economy will need to undergo a complete transformation in order to prevent devastating climate change in the future, during a speech Wednesday at the ongoing United Nations climate conference in Glasgow, Scotland. The Treasury secretary delivered the remarks during the summit’s “finance day” opening event.

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U.S. Adds 531,000 Jobs in October, Exceeding Expectations

The U..S. economy recorded an increase of 531,000 jobs in October, and unemployment fell by 0.2% as the labor market recovers from the summer lows, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS).

The number of unemployed people fell to 7.4 million, down from 7.7 million in September, according to the BLS report released Friday. Economists surveyed by Dow Jones projected 450,000 jobs would be added in October.

While unemployment claims continue to fall, the country still struggles with labor shortages, supply chain issues and growing inflation.  Job growth was widespread throughout the economy in October, with leisure and hospitality adding 164,000 jobs, professional and business adding 100,000 and manufacturing adding 60,000 jobs, according to the BLS report.

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Ohio Attorney General Yost, Six Other State Attorneys General Challenge Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s Emergency COVID Regulations

Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost and six other state attorneys general have challenged the Biden administration’s authority to impose COVID-19 regulations through the Occupational Safety and Health Administration emergency regulations power in a lawsuit filed in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit in Cincinnati.

Yost joined Republican colleagues in Kentucky, Kansas, Idaho, Oklahoma, Tennessee and West Virginia on Nov. 5 in asking the court to rule against the OSHA regulations requiring those working for businesses with 100 or more employees to either get vaccinnated or wear masks indoors at their workplaces and get tested once every seven days.

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Federal Prosecutors Seeking Hefty Sentence for Felon Connected to Trulieve

Federal prosecutors are seeking a hefty fine for J.T. Burnette after he was found guilty on five public corruption charges in August. The government issued a memo saying Burnette participated in extortion and bribery for so long and was unremorseful that the sentence should be extended.

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Tucson Border Patrol Arrests 19-Year-Old Human Smuggler

On June 17, 2020, Tucson Sector Border Patrol Agents conduct operations at the Highway 86 checkpoint near Tucson, Ariz. (U.S. Customs and Border Protection photo by Jerry Glaser)

As the border crisis largely unabated due to a seemingly-disinterested White House, U.S. Customs and Border Protection’s (CBP) Tucson Sector continues its uphill battle to stop the illegal alien influx.

It reported Tuesday that it captured a teenage human smuggler attempting to enter the United States. 

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Minneapolis and St. Paul Mayors Reelected Despite ‘Failed Leadership’ Amidst 2020 Riots

Both the Minneapolis and St. Paul mayors were reelected despite many claiming “failed leadership” during the riots of 2020. Current Mayors Melvin Carter and Jacob Frey were both reelected in Minnesota’s November general election.

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Wisconsin Rep. Gallagher Introduces Legislation to Ban Foreign Donors from Contributing to U.S. Ballot Initiatives

Wisconsin Rep. Mike Gallagher (R-WI-08) introduced bipartisan legislation to ban foreign money from influencing United States elections. Gallagher announced his bill after the Federal Election Commission decided to allow foreign donors to contribute to U.S. ballot initiatives.

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Georgia Files Suit Against Joe Biden’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration Employer COVID-19 Vaccine Mandate

Georgia Governor Brian Kemp and state Attorney General Chris Carr on Friday announced that they filed a lawsuit challenging the Biden administration’s employer vaccine mandate. The Federal Register published The Emergency Temporary Standard (ETS) setting forth the mandate on Friday, the press release said.

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Bipartisan Bills Would Eliminate Michigan Sales Tax on Vehicle Rebates

row of cars

The Michigan Senate will consider legislation to eliminate sales and use taxes from automotive manufacturer rebates, which could save new car buyers in the state an estimated $31 million annually.

House Bills 4939 and 4940 passed the Michigan House earlier this week. The bipartisan bills were sponsored by Reps. John Damoose, R-Harbor Springs, and Joe Tate, D-Detroit.  The bills aim to take new vehicle customers off the hook for paying taxes on automotive manufacturer discounts.  

Currently, Michigan car buyers incur a tax obligation for the full price of the vehicle they purchase, and no deductions are allowed for rebates offered by manufacturers. The bills under consideration would exempt rebates from state sales and use taxes.

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Democratic Governors Association Not Eager to Challenge DeSantis

Ron DeSantis

The Democratic Governors Association (DGA) will likely not be writing large checks to Florida’s Democratic gubernatorial challengers to Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis. Congressman Charlie Crist (D-FL-13) and Florida Agriculture Commissioner Nikki Fried (D) are the most likely candidates to face off against DeSantis in a general election.

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Cleveland Police Chief Resigns After New Mayor Elected

Cleveland Police Chief Calvin Williams

Cleveland’s Chief of Police abruptly resigned in the wake of incoming Mayor Justin Bibb’s election Tuesday. 

“I said, if you’re not running for mayor, I’m out the door with you,” Cleveland Police Chief Calvin Williams said Thursday, referring to outgoing Mayor Frank Jackson. “I only told a few folks, some of our command staff, my family and close friends that if the mayor wasn’t gonna be sitting in that seat in 2022, I wouldn’t be sitting in the seat next to him… This is my last official act as the Chief of this division. I’m gonna miss you guys.”

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As Dems’ Hope of Keeping Senate Dims, Vulnerable Warnock Hews to the Left, Links Election Reform to Racial Politics

Even as the 2021 elections and President Joe Biden’s approval ratings make Democrats’ hope of keeping Senate control after next year seem less likely, Sen. Raphael Warnock (D-GA) has doubled down on his thoroughly leftist agenda.

In a tweet the day after Republicans swept statewide contests in the previously “blue” state of Virginia and nearly unseated Gov. Phil Murphy (D) in the even more Democratic state of New Jersey, Warnock is accusing Republicans of having “stood in the way of” voting rights.

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Miyares Wants Authority to Override Commonwealth’s Attorneys If Requested by Law Enforcement

Miyares holds press conference

Attorney general-elect Jason Miyares wants the General Assembly to authorize him to get involved in local prosecution if the top local law enforcement officer says the Commonwealth’s attorney isn’t doing their job. In a press conference Thursday, Miyares specifically called out progressive prosecutors in northern Virginia.

“Right now, the way it works is if a sitting Commonwealth’s attorney requests it, we can come in and prosecute a case on their behalf,” Miyares said. “We’re going to be seeking a legislative change, and the governor-elect Glenn Youngkin has already indicated that he would sign that into law.”

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Minority Leader Todd Gilbert Previews Republican Priorities for New Virginia House Majority

House of Delegates Minority Leader Todd Gilbert (R-Shenadoah) outlined Republicans’ legislative goals for when they take majority control of the House, governor, attorney general, and lieutenant governor’s seats. In a press conference Friday, he said that win did give Republicans a mandate, but said he was also aware of the need to work across the aisle since the Senate remains in Democratic control. He said the issues that Republicans raised during the campaigns would drive their agenda, including schools, cost of living, and public safety.

“We know we have a divided government now, and for lots of reasons, we think at least in terms of administration of the institutions, we will probably work better with the Democratic leadership  than the House leadership did,” Gilbert said.

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Commentary: Archimedes’ ‘Death Ray’ Is Possible but Impractical

Archimedes of Syracuse is generally regarded as one of the greatest mathematicians who ever lived. So revered was his wisdom and celebrated his legacy that legendary scholars who lived nearly two millennia after Archimedes’ death in 212 BC hailed him across the ages. Galileo called him “superhuman”. Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz remarked that he spoiled genius itself. Christiaan Huygens said that Archimedes was “comparable to no one”.

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Tennessee Textbook Commission Member Laurie Cardoza-Moore Discusses Tennessee Department of Education Progressive New Hire Rachael Maves

Friday morning on the Tennessee Star Report, host Michael Patrick Leahy welcomed Tennessee Textbook and Instruction Materials Quality Commission member Laurie Cardoza-Moore to the newsmakers line to discuss the hiring of progressive Rachael Maves to the DOE.

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Commentary: The Washington Post Finally Releases Sketchy Details That Raise Questions About the January 6 ‘Pipe Bombs’

Several storylines related to the events of January 6 have crumbled under closer scrutiny over the past 10 months: the “fire extinguisher” murder of Officer Brian Sicknick; the notion it was an “armed” insurrection and a grand “conspiracy” concocted by right-wing militias; claims that the building sustained $30 million in damages, and so on.

In the meantime, the Biden regime has attempted to cover up key aspects of that day, including the name of the officer who shot and killed Ashli Babbitt, which was only recently revealed. Justice Department lawyers continue to resist the release of 14,000 hours of surveillance video and the U.S. Capitol Police refuse to publish an 800-page internal investigation on officer misconduct as well as internal communications before and after the Capitol breach.

But a deep dive by the Washington Post, published last weekend, raises new questions about the alleged “pipe bombs” discovered just before Congress met on January 6 to certify the results of the 2020 Electoral College vote. Like so many supporting scenes, the veracity of the pipe bomb tale is in doubt after the Post revealed eyebrow-raising details about those involved.

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Only Two Prominent Dems Think McAuliffe Was Too ‘Woke’ for Virginia

AOC and James Carville

Many Democrats have claimed failed gubernatorial candidate Terry McAuliffe’s lost Tuesday’s election because he failed to appeal to the party’s progressive wing. 

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY-14), for example, said the campaign was not progressive enough, and complained that the progressive wing of the party was left out of McAuliffe’s bid for the governorship.

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More Than 40 BlueCross BlueShield of Tennessee Employees Who Refused COVID-19 Vaccine Join the Unemployed

BlueCross BlueShield of Tennessee (BSBCT) had 41 fewer employees as of Friday because those now-former employees said no to the COVID-19 vaccine. BSBCT spokeswoman Dalya Qualls told The Tennessee Star in an email Friday that 19 staff members left the company last month. She also said another 22 staff members left Thursday. Qualls did not specify how many BSBCT employees left voluntarily versus how many got fired.

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