Nashville Mayor John Cooper Calls on Bordeaux and North Nashville Businesses to Register as Nashville Vendors and Suppliers

John Cooper

 

Nashville Mayor John Cooper is calling on small business owners in Bordeaux and North Nashville to join the participatory budgeting initiative by registering as Metro Nashville vendors and suppliers.

In a statement, Mayor Cooper also said those small business owners should be “ready for competitive procurement opportunities as these projects take shape.”

“As we invest in our neighborhoods – particularly Bordeaux and North Nashville – we want business owners from these communities to be the suppliers, contractors, designers, and builders who help make these projects a reality,” Mayor Cooper said.

Previously, as part of the participatory budgeting initiative, North Nashville and Bordeaux residents picked eight city projects to fund. The budgeting steering committee is working with the mayor and Metro Council to move these projects forward: a new pavilion – with a pathway, fencing and picnic tables – plus an upgraded playground with new equipment and rubber surfacing at Bordeaux Gardens Park, 1490 Snell Boulevard, an air conditioning system for the gym at the Looby Community Center, 2301 Rosa Parks Boulevard, six sets of speed bumps on Hinkle Drive in the Bordeaux Hills neighborhood, to keep speeds there between 15 and 20 miles per hour, better outdoor restroom facilities at Hartman Park, 2801 Tucker Road, a better playground at Hartman Park, with new equipment, rubber surfacing and ramps for better accessibility, landscape improvements at Hartman Park, new signage to designate the Buchanan Arts District, and additional bus shelters.

The mayor’s office said that that the participatory budgeting dollars are allocated from Nashville’s capital budget, so they have to be spend on infrastructure projects. This initiative is one in a larger set of North Nashville and Bordeaux community investments which include: a new Fire Station Number 2, opening access to 53 acres of park space in Trinity Hills, maintenance and upgrades at 12 schools, including a new track at Hunters Lane High School (1150 Hunters Lane), new bus stops and shelters and road paving projects, as well as stormwater mitigation projects.

Participatory budgeting was introduced to Nashville in the FY2021 capital spending plan with a $2 million investment in neighborhoods within districts 1,2,3,19 and 21.

Participatory budgeting dollars come from the city’s capital budget; so, by law, they must be spent on infrastructure projects. But the initiative is one in a larger set of Bordeaux and North Nashville neighborhood investments, including: a new Fire Station Number 2, opening access to 53 acres of park space in Trinity Hills, maintenance and upgrades at 12 schools, including a new track at Hunters Lane High School (1150 Hunters Lane), new bus stops and shelters and road paving projects, and stormwater mitigation projects.
For a step-by-step guide to registering as a Metro vendor: go to How To Do Business With Metro or send questions to [email protected]

The Metro Nashville Mayor’s Office Participatory Budgeting Guidelines lists the criteria for what a successful project proposal will look like:

Take place in the Bordeaux/North Nashville region

Limited to capital infrastructure or capital improvements because these funds are coming from the Capital Spending Plan (CSP)

Benefit the public at-large

Provide tangible, permanent benefits

Accomplish goals via initial, one-time funding

By engaging in PB, residents in communities help Metro make direct investments in what a neighborhood needs. PB connects community needs with the resources to make change.

Community voices will determine how dollars will be spent. Government can improve the daily lives of constituents, but to be successful, leaders need consideration and participation of local voices.

Members of the 2021 Participatory Budgeting Project Steering Committee Members include Judge Rachel Bell (Chair) – General Sessions Court Judge, Alandis Brassel – Counsel, Scale LLP; Assistant Professor of Music Business, University of Memphis Rudi E. Scheidt School of Music, Eric D. Capehart, Sr. (Vice Chair) – Professional Counselor and Wellness Coach, Lerlie Cleveland – Clinician, Meharry Medical College, MNPS (retired), and Rev. Sonnye Dixon – Lead Pastor, Hobson UMC . The full list, including community volunteer members, can be found here.

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Aaron Gulbransen is a reporter at The Tennessee Star and The Star News Network. Email tips to [email protected]
Photo “Tennessee Mayor John Cooper” by City of Nashville CC BY-SA 4.0.

 

 

 

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4 Thoughts to “Nashville Mayor John Cooper Calls on Bordeaux and North Nashville Businesses to Register as Nashville Vendors and Suppliers”

  1. rick

    Little Johnny has to buy the minority vote with our money, that what its all about! I cannot believe that Nashville would elect this piece of garbage again, but he is buying the vote as quickly as he can. Maybe he is getting the big boy cut, not big guy like Brandon he is to short, out of this fiasco. Yea Commie what about the rest of Nashville you jerk?

  2. Randall Davidson

    apparently there are no other neighborhoods in Nashville.

    1. 83ragtop50

      Randall – None or few that still support this disaster. Maybe the refugees and illegals in South Nashville. Oh and the bums living on the streets getting goodies from his administration.

  3. LM

    How much will be budgeted for law enforcement man power to keep drug dealers , gangs, and prostitutes out of the new Bordeaux parks?

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