Baltimore to Spend $90 Million in Federal Funds on Hotels for Homeless and Other Homeless Programs

by Laurel Duggan

 

Baltimore plans to spend $90.4 million of federal funds to buy hotels to replace existing homeless shelters and support other homelessness programs, The Baltimore Sun reported Tuesday.

The city has not yet announced which hotels it will buy, but it plans to replace 275 existing beds in several shelters with private rooms in city-owned hotels, the Sun reported.

“Non-congregate shelter is a best practice we’re seeing throughout the nation,” Director of the Mayor’s Office of Homeless Services Irene Agustin told the Sun. “We know this is an intervention that’s going to work within the city of Baltimore.”

The funding will also go toward a Baltimore project focused on moving homeless people out of shelters and into permanent housing through case managers and rental assistance, the Sun reported.

Most of the money will come from COVID-19 relief funds and, in addition to covering the cost of hotels, the funds will help pay rent for formerly homeless people and incentivize landlords to provide affordable properties, according to the Sun.

“The reality is investments in housing, investments in rental assistance, they’ve just been lacking for many, many years and decades,” Agustin said, the Sun reported. “What the federal government and HUD have seen is that housing helps keep people safe. It helps mitigate the spread of COVID-19. Overall, for people, it’s the best place for them.”

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Laurel Duggan is a reporter at Daily Caller News Foundation.
 

 


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One Thought to “Baltimore to Spend $90 Million in Federal Funds on Hotels for Homeless and Other Homeless Programs”

  1. 83ragtop50

    Not sure if moving into a Baltimore hotel is an improvement over living on the street.
    I was once required reserve Baltimore hotel rooms for my team through the Baltimore convention authority when our company attended a convention there. One of the rooms had a single 60 watt bulb hanging from the ceiling by the electrical wire. My room was better but just barely. Filthy and moldy with a disgustingly dirty toilet. I swore I would never go there again… and I have not.

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