Biden’s ‘Racial Equity’ Committee Includes Soros-Funded Nonprofit Heads

President Joe Biden’s Treasury Department appointed two people to its “racial equity” committee that run nonprofits that received millions from left-wing billionaire George Soros’ Open Society Foundations (OSF) network, records show.

On Tuesday, Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen unveiled the members for its Committee on Racial Equity, which will advise the agency on how “to advance racial equity in the economy and address acute disparities for communities of color.” Felicia Wong and Lorella Praeli, two committee members, lead four nonprofits that got over $15.7 million from OSF’s network between 2016 and 2020, according to OSF’s grant database.

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Man Attacks Catholic Cathedral with Fire and a Sword

A man used fire and a sword to attack an Oklahoma Catholic cathedral while school was in session on Wednesday, the school told the Daily Caller News Foundation.

Daniel Edwards, carrying a large ice chest, attempted to break into the cathedral of Holy Family Cathedral School in Tulsa, Oklahoma, while students were outside taking school pictures, the school told the DCNF. Edwards then threw a flaming object into the side of the building and used a sword to attack the school’s front desk attendant when he confronted Edwards.

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GOP Projects to Score Four Gubernatorial Wins in Midterms

Republicans are expected to flip four governorships in Democratic-led states in November’s elections, bringing the total number of GOP governors in the country to 30, according to projections published on Friday.

Republican candidates are currently leading polls in gubernatorial races in Nevada, Oregon, Wisconsin and Kansas, according to polls aggregated by RealClearPolitics (RCP). Two of these states, Oregon and Nevada, are rated by the Cook Partisan Voting Index (CPVI) as more Democratic than Republican, making them much tougher territory for GOP candidates to win.

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Sevierville Police Department Announces Participation in ‘No-Shave November’ to Raise Cancer Awareness

The City of Sevierville Police Department (SPD) announced this week that it would participate in the national No-Shave November program. SPD is extending its participation in the national program to include October.

No-Shave November is a ”web-based, non-profit organization devoted to growing cancer awareness and raising funds to support cancer prevention, research, and education,” according to its website. No-Shave November is a “month-long journey during which participants forgo shaving and grooming in order to evoke conversation and raise cancer awareness.”

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Commentary: The Plague of McConnellism

There is a plague on our country, on the Republican Party and conservatism, in particular. 

A plague is a disastrous evil or affliction, often termed a calamity. As a noxious infestation, it can be a disease causing high mortality (yersinia pestis) and occur in several forms. They can also be persons that cause irritation and are as such a great nuisance, or worse. 

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The FBI Has a Sexual Misconduct Problem, Whistleblowers Reveal

Hundreds of FBI employees avoided discipline for sexual misconduct by retiring or resigning amid investigations from 2004 to 2020, according to Department of Justice records obtained by Republican Iowa Sen. Chuck Grassley.

Whistleblower documents revealed that 665 FBI employees, including 45 senior executives, left their jobs following investigations into alleged sexual misconduct before they could be disciplined, according to Grassley. Higher ranking officials were subjected to less severe penalties than other staff, according to the documents.

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Connecticut Child-Care Workers Get $70 Million in Bonuses

Child-care workers in Connecticut will soon be getting bonus payments.

The Lamont administration announced Thursday afternoon that $70 million in Appreciate Bonus Payments will be distributed to child-care providers in the state. Bonuses of $1,000 will go to full-time employees of child-care providers and $400 to part-time workers through the Wage Supports for Early Childhood Educators program.

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Virginia State Senator and Former Race Car Driver Criticize Top Legislators in Lawsuit for Skill Games Amendment in Budget

Senator Bill Stanley (R-Franklin) is representing former race car driver Hermie Sadler in a lawsuit over skill games against Governor Glenn Youngkin, Attorney General Jason Miyares, and the Virginia ABC. In an August update to the lawsuit first filed against the previous administration, Sadler criticizes top finance legislators for modifying Virginia’s skill games ban through the budget and says the ban still violates free speech and due process rights.

“[A] select group of budget conferees, including Senator Howell and Delegate Barry Knight schemed to sneak into the delayed budget bill a purported amendment to the enjoined Skill Games Ban,” the updated lawsuit complaint states.

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Judge Overrules Wisconsin Elections Commission on Ballot Spoiling

A judge says voters in Wisconsin don’t get a do-over once they’ve turned in their ballot.

A judge in Waukesha on Thursday overruled the Wisconsin Elections Commission’s guidance that people can vote a second time if they change their mind.

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COVID-19 Concerns Disappear from Key Pennsylvania Elections

While the economy has been the top concern for Pennsylvania voters, concerns about COVID-19 have all but disappeared.

The impact of inflation and a spike in gas prices making their financial effects felt in the wallets of the public has made what was a live and passionate issue a year ago an afterthought today.

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Minnesota Democratic Candidates Under Fire for Ducking Debates

Gov. Tim Walz and Minnesota Secretary of State Steve Simon are facing backlash after they both declined to participate in a televised debate on TPT Almanac.

According to MPR and TPT Almanac host Cathy Wurzer, Simon was scheduled to participate in a debate Friday with Republican challenger Kim Crockett but canceled at the last minute, citing a scheduling conflict.

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Ohio Teachers Union Against New Bill That Allows Veterans to Be Teachers

Ohio’s teachers union believes a bill in the General Assembly that would reduce requirements for veterans to become teachers would also reduce the quality of education in the state.

A bill introduced in the state Senate would allow school boards across the state to hire military veterans as teachers and be deemed to hold a teaching certificate.

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Lone Florida Governor Debate Between DeSantis, Crist Cancelled in Hurricane Ian Aftermath

Charlie Crist

The lone debate next week between Florida GOP Gov. Ron DeSantis and Democrat challenger Charlie Crist has been postponed due to the aftermath of Hurricane Ian.

The announcement was made Thursday by the debate host, local news station WPEC News 12, according to the Orlando Sentinel newspaper.

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Georgia Study Indicates $103 Million in Improvements Needed for State’s Air Cargo System

A Georgia study identified more than $103 million in air cargo investments at Georgia airports to keep up with growing demands, and state taxpayers may fund at least some of the projects.

The Statewide Air Cargo Study conducted for the Georgia Department of Transportation recommended the state create an Air Cargo Working Group to, in part, advocate for funding from the state legislature. The study does not include the air cargo investment needed at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport, the country’s 13th busiest air cargo airport.

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Doug Ducey Celebrates Results from Historic Multistate Law Enforcement to Disrupt Cartel Activity

Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey (R) celebrated the results of a first-of-its-kind law enforcement operation between 26 states to crack down on cartel activity by seizing deadly drugs and firearms.

“In Arizona, we’re taking action to stop the flow of dangerous drugs through the southern border, impede the cartels’ criminal activity and protect our communities,” said Ducey. “Earlier this year, we teamed up with Texas and 24 other states to share intelligence and strengthen security through the first-of-its-kind American Governors’ Border Strike Force. We’re already seeing results thanks to this coordinated effort — including thousands of pounds of drugs being seized all across the nation.”

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Ohio AG Moves to Cut Attorneys’ Fees in FirstEnergy Settlement

Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost wants a judge to cut attorneys’ fees by $10 million as ratepayers near a settlement in a class action lawsuit with FirstEnergy.

Yost filed an objection in U.S. District Court in the Southern District of Ohio against the lawyers’ plan to receive a third of the $49 million settlement that still needs final approval from Judge Edmund Sargus.

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Virginia Receives Three Awards for Economic Development Programs

The International Economic Development Council gave the Virginia Department of Housing and Community Development excellence awards for three of the department’s economic development programs: the Community Business Launch, Industrial Revitalization Fund and Growth and Opportunity for Virginia (GO Virginia).

“Virginia’s IEDC awards are well-deserved recognition for the ongoing and innovative programs that are supporting our economic development efforts across Virginia,” Governor Glenn Youngkin said in a release.

Youngkin’s office regularly highlights grants and other economic development projects across Virginia.

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Federal Judge Rules Biden Admin’s LGBTQ Employee Protections Go Too Far

A federal judge in Texas ruled that the Biden administration overstepped in issuing protections for LGBTQ employees by allowing them to use bathrooms based on their gender identity.

The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) released guidance in 2021 aiming to protect LGBTQ individuals from discrimination in the workplace, allowing them to use bathrooms and pronouns that correspond with their gender identity. U.S. District Court Judge for the Northern District of Texas Matthew Kacsmaryk ruled these protections went too far and that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 bars the LGBTQ community from discriminatory hiring practices “but not necessarily all correlated conduct,” including bathroom and pronoun use.

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Commentary: Key Catholic Demographic Split on Support for Biden

He wears a rosary on his wrist, attends Mass weekly, and remains the only Catholic president in United States history other than John F. Kennedy. And yet, a clear majority of Catholic voters would prefer that President Biden not return to the Oval Office.

When asked if the president should run for a second term, 58.4% replied “no.” Only 22.2% said “yes.” Rough results, but Biden shouldn’t take them too personally.

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Biden Gives Himself Final Say on All Drone Strikes Outside War Zones

President Joe Biden tightened rules on conducting drone strikes outside of war zones, requiring that he sign off on the list of eligible targets, The New York Times reported Friday.

The policy Biden signed Friday, which remains classified, says that both Biden and the State Department’s top official in the country of operation must approve targets, signaling that the White House intends to pare down the number of drone strikes, the NYT reported, citing a senior administration official. Previous policy for eliminating terrorist threats using unmanned aerial vehicles afforded greater latitude to field commanders in determining who to target.

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Congresswoman Seeks DOJ Review of Missing Data for 3.1 Million New York Voters

As New York state struggles with allegations of election fraud, a new review of its voter lists shows that basic personal identification information is missing for 3.1 million registered voters, in apparent violation of federal law. 

States vary, but the general standard for voter registration information is to include either a Social Security number or a driver’s license number, according to a report by the Public Interest Legal Foundation.

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Commentary: The Faith of Nations

In the faith of nations is their life and their undoing, much as it is with individuals. We may survive on the faith of others, but we cannot flourish any more than a child would when attempting to live out the dreams of his parents without making them his own. Faith is an intangible. The artificial intelligence of a computer might precisely calculate the chance of a success but it has no clue as to the value of failure. Faith can absorb both and then some. 

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