Memphis Mayor Laments ‘Revolving Door’ of Crime

In his weekly update, Memphis’ mayor lamented the city’s “revolving door” of crime, and said he supports new tough-on-crime legislature recently enacted by the Tennessee legislature. 

“Last week, I told you about a man who, while driving a car, struck a Memphis police officer on foot, causing him to roll over the hood and be thrown to the ground. He led officers on a high-speed vehicle pursuit and crashed into a citizen’s car. He fled on foot. Officers apprehended him and found him in possession of a handgun. He was given a $15,000 bond,” said Mayor Jim Strickland. “Guess what has happened? He has posted his bond, was released, and is out and about in the Memphis community.”

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TDOE, Department of Agriculture Team Up to Boost State’s Future Farmers of America Program

Tennessee’s Department of Education (TDOE) and its Department of Agriculture (TDA) are teaming up to promote a nearly 100-year-old student organization.

Membership numbers are on the rise for Future Farmers of America (FFA) in the state, according to a joint release from the TDOE and TDOA. 

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Two Republican Senators Call for GOP Senate Leadership Vote to Be Postponed

Sens. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) and Josh Hawley (R-Mo.) on Friday urged Republicans to postpone next week’s Senate leadership elections to give the party time to regroup after its disappointing midterm performance.

According to reports, Sen. Rick Scott (R-Fla.) had been considering a long-shot bid to replace Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), but he changed his mind on Wednesday when it became clear that there would be no “red wave” and that Republicans may not even take control of the chamber.

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Mayorkas Told Border Chief to Resign or Face Biden Firing

Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas instructed Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Commissioner Chris Magnus to resign or face firing directly from President Joe Biden, Magnus told the Los Angeles Times.

Magnus has long faced scrutiny from Republican lawmakers, who demanded his resignation in November following complaints from colleagues about his job performance, including that he fell asleep during meetings, as previously reported by Politico. He said Friday he’s refusing to back down from his post, according to the LA Times.

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Inside GOP, Calls Grow for Party Chair to Resign in Wake of Midterms

A growing number of Republican Party officials are frustrated with GOP Chairwoman Ronna McDaniel following Tuesday’s midterm elections and want her to resign, according to Republican sources familiar with the situation.

“People are upset and want to replace Ronna,” said one veteran Republican National Committee official. “They’re calling for her resignation but not publicly. [RNC] members are calling for accountability as they should.”

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The Tennessee Comptroller’s Office Issues Report Providing Optimism, While Raising Questions Around K-3 Student Reading

A recently released report from the Tennessee Comptroller’s office shows that Tennessee K-3 students are making positive, albeit slight, growth in acquiring reading skills. Those conclusions were drawn from state-mandated K-3 universal reading screeners (URS), which all school districts are required to administer as part of legislation passed in 2021 during a Special Session of the General Assembly on education.

Legislators passed the Tennessee Literacy Success Act (TLSA), with the intent to ensure that students were on track to become proficient readers by the end of grade 3. The URS requirement was embedded in the bill as a means to safeguard taxpayer investment while delivering on promises made to Tennessee students.

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Ohio Republican Party Chair Bob Paduchik Won’t Seek Re-Election

Ohio Republican Party (ORP) Chairman Bob Paduchik announced that he won’t seek reelection as state party chairman following a GOP sweep of statewide offices.

“I will not run for reelection for the chairmanship of the Ohio Republican Party. It is time for a new leader to take leadership of the party and I look forward to the January election of ORP officers,” Paduchik wrote in a letter to members of the Ohio Republican Party’s governing body.

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Arizona Likely Sends Two New GOP Congressmen to Washington, Democrats Could Unseat Another

Despite hundreds of thousands of votes yet to be tabulated, poll watchers had seen enough to predict two new Republican U.S. House members, but another GOP incumbent is on the ropes.

On Friday morning, incumbent Democratic U.S. Rep. Tom O’Halleran conceded to challenger Eli Crane for Arizona’s 2nd Congressional District. The three-term Democrat faced a tough reelection bid after being shuffled into a new district that favored Republicans. 

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Michigan Taxpayers Shell Out $5 Million for Lansing Concert Venue

Michigan taxpayers will pay at least $7.75 million for a new entertainment venue in Downtown Lansing.

The Michigan Strategic Fund on Wednesday approved $5 million of taxpayer dollars for the venue. The Center Square reported the planned $21 million venue in February.

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Minnesota Republican Helped Democrats Take Control of State Government

by Anthony Gockowski   State Rep. Tony Jurgens, a Republican, endorsed a Democrat in a crucial race that helped the Minnesota DFL reclaim the majority in the Senate for the first time in six years. With Democrats already controlling the governor’s mansion and the House before the election, the Senate was…

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Youngkin Responds to Trump Dig: ‘That’s Not the Way I Roll’

Virginia GOP Gov. Glenn Youngkin on Friday brushed off former President Trump’s criticism of him – which followed his lieutenant governor, Winsome Sears, saying Trump should remove himself from GOP electoral politics. 

“Listen, you all know me,” Youngkin told reporters. “I do not call people names. I really work hard to bring people together … . That’s not the way I roll and not the way I behave.”

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Commentary: The Rise of Intersectionality in Medicine Will Have Serious Consequences

In early October, my alma mater made headlines after it decided to fire chemistry professor Dr. Maitland Jones Jr. after 82 of his students signed a petition noting that his organic chemistry class was “too hard.” The students accused Jones of purposely making the class difficult, citing that their low scores negatively impacted their “well-being,” and their chances of getting into medical school. Instead of evaluating the rigor and substance of Jones’ curriculum, NYU justified its hasty action by noting the class’s unfavorable student reviews. This type of judgment would never pass in the fields of architecture, aerial engineering, or even the food service industry; why is it permissible here?

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Ammo Manufacturer Plans New Facility in Georgia, but Officials Silent on Incentives

An ammunition manufacturer plans to spend $60 million to build a new manufacturing and distribution facility in Bryan County, Ga.

Georgia officials would not say whether the state offered any tax incentives to encourage Norma Precision to build its new facility in Georgia. A spokeswoman for the Georgia Department of Economic Development told The Center Square that the project is “still active,” a designation that allows state officials to decline to release details about tax incentives the state offered.

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League of Wisconsin Municipalities Says Tax Hike Votes Show Need for More State Money

The people who lobby for local governments in Wisconsin are once again talking about more state money.

The League of Wisconsin Municipalities on Thursday said the wave of local tax referendum questions show the need for funding “reform.”

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Campaign Begins to Educate on Responsible Cannabis Use in Connecticut

Connecticut has launched a new educational public campaign to promote responsible adult-use cannabis.

As the state has legalized the possession of small amounts of cannabis for adults age 21 and over, Gov. Ned Lamont and the state’s Department of Consumer Protection are working in unison to encourage health and safety.

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Virginia Passenger Rail Ridership Exceeded Pre-Pandemic Levels in September

Virginia’s Amtrak service ridership hit 105,689 in September, up from the pre-pandemic 76,793 riders in September 2019, for 37.6 percent growth. That’s also an improvement from September 2021 ridership at 50,776.

In a Thursday press release, the Virginia Passenger Rail Authority said “the numbers show the strong rebound in post-pandemic travel with every route seeing an increase.”

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Pacific Legal Foundation Argues Against Thomas Jefferson High School’s Admissions Policy in Video

The Pacific Legal Foundation (PLF) released a new video supporting its legal efforts to fight new admissions policies at Thomas Jefferson (TJ) High School for Science and Technology; the video argues that efforts to change the policy amount to a racist effort to reduce the number of Asian students at the school.

School officials instituted a merit lottery in 2020 to expand the student base to under-represented groups. In response, the Coalition protested the decision, and the PLF began representing the coalition in a drawn-out legal battle aimed at blocking the new policy. A district court agreed with the PLF and said the process was discriminatory, but the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit stayed the lower court’s order, allowing the school to use its new admissions policy for the 2022-2023 school year.

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Economics Professor: Interest Rates Likely Will Continue to Rise into 2023, Lead to Job Losses

While high rates of inflation have hit the entire nation hard, some regions have experienced it more intensely.

WalletHub reported Thursday that the Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, MN-WI, metropolitan statistical area has experienced the 16th highest rise in inflation, based on two Consumer Price Index metrics: latest month versus two months prior and latest month versus one year ago. The metrics received equal weight in the report.

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Prominent Pollster Says Time for America to Mandate All Ballots Be Counted on Election Day5

With states like Arizona, Nevada and Alaska taking days to determine midterm election results, influential pollster Scott Rasmussen says there is overwhelming support for America to mandate ballots be in and counted by Election Day.

“One of the 80% issues, and there aren’t a whole lot of 80% issues in America-one of them is that all ballots should be in by Election Day,” Scott Rasmussen said Wednesday night on the “Just the News, No Noise” TV show. “We should know the results on Election Day.”

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Biden to Meet with China Leader Xi on Monday, First Time as U.S. President

Xi Jinping and Joe Biden toasting a drink

President Biden will meet Monday with China President Xi Jinping at the Group of 20 Summit in Bali, Indonesia, the White House announced Thursday.

The meeting will be what is referred to as “on the sidelines” of the event, which mean it will not be part of the official public agenda.

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Andy Biggs Commentary: Pandemic Amnesty Can’t Happen

Come January, House Republicans will need to immediately reverse the Democrats’ disastrous policies to get our country back in good shape.

My America First Contract outlines a number of areas that help us get there, but one important area that cannot be dismissed is conducting enhanced oversight on harmful COVID bureaucrats. They cannot be let off the hook so easily.

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Commentary: America Needs to Take Immigration 101

If there’s one thing our corporate media loves as much as hyping an upcoming election, it is conducting a days-long postmortem on that election: identifying the winners and losers, who dropped the ball and who is “The Next Big Thing.” Yet, beneath the surface of personality-driven analysis, one can find data that reveals much about what Americans see as the nation’s biggest problems. 

An NBC News exit poll found that the biggest issues to voters, in order of importance, were: inflation, abortion, crime, gun policy, and immigration. After the last two years of Biden-fueled destruction of our border, the idea that immigration barely registers as the fifth-most important issue to voters should be disturbing. 

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