American Inventor Series: Margaret E. Knight, the ‘Lady Edison’

Margaret E. Knight, born in York, Maine in 1838, preferred a “jack-knife, a gimlet, and pieces of wood” to dolls as a young girl. Her amateur woodworking skills made her sleds the “envy of the town’s boys” while her kites were famous throughout the community, according to Henry Petroski’s account of the young inventor in The American Scholar.

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American Inventor Series: William H. Miner, Inspiration for Rural Americans

William H. Miner was born during the Civil War and died during the Great Depression. He was orphaned at the age of 10 after the death of his father and his only son died a week after birth. He nonetheless exhibited an “unswerving optimism, iron will, dogged determination, meticulous management, and supreme self-confidence,” according to Miner biographer Joseph C. Burke.

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American Inventor Series: Benjamin Franklin, American Printer

Before anything else, Benjamin Franklin was a printer. It’s difficult to imagine now, but printing was a strenuous trade in Franklin’s time, requiring late hours, heavy lifting of various lead types, and long shifts operating the manual presses. Franklin, however, loved to read, which suited him well in his career as a printer.

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Hootie and the Blowfish Rock Sold-out Crowd in Nashville

Twenty-eight years after performing their first Nashville show at the revered rock club Exit/In, Hootie & The Blowfish brought their Group Therapy Tour to the city’s Bridgestone Arena for a sold-out show Saturday night.

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Movies to Watch This Weekend

In 2003, British intelligence specialist Katharine Gun (Keira Knightley) gets a memo from the NSA detailing how Great Britain is helping America gather compromising information of U.N. Security Council members so they will vote in favor of the Iraq War. Trying to avoid seeing a war happen, Gun defies her government and releases the memo to the press.

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