Special Master Holds First Meeting with Justice Department, Trump Attorneys, in New York

Attorneys for former President Trump and the Justice Department are scheduled to meet Tuesday in New York with the court-appointed special master who is reviewing the documents seized by the FBI during the bureau’s raid of Mar-a-Lago last month.

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FBI Raid of Mar-a-Lago Was ‘Improper’: Dershowitz

Harvard Law School Professor Emeritus Alan Dershowitz said that the FBI’s search of Donald Trump’s Florida estate was incorrectly conducted.

Earlier in August, FBI agents with the Washington Field Office raided the former president’s Mar-a-Lago home seeking classified documents he may have removed from the White House. Reports subsequently emerged that Trump had already been served with a subpoena seeking classified records related to the investigation and had cooperated extensively with federal authorities.

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Old Case Over Audio Tapes in Bill Clinton’s Sock Drawer Could Impact Mar-a-Lago Search Dispute

When it comes to the National Archives, history has a funny way of repeating itself. And legal experts say a decade-old case over audio tapes that Bill Clinton once kept in his sock drawer may have significant impact over the FBI search of Melania Trump’s closet and Donald Trump’s personal office.

The case in question is titled Judicial Watch v. National Archives and Records Administration and it involved an effort by the conservative watchdog to compel the Archives to forcibly seize hours of audio recordings that Clinton made during his presidency with historian Taylor Branch.

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DOJ Admits ‘Mistakenly’ Taking Trump’s Passports, Offers to Return Them

In an acknowledgment the FBI over-collected evidence during the Mar-a-Lago raid, the Justice Department informed Donald Trump’s team Monday that agents seized the former president’s passports and are obligated to return them, Just the News has learned,

DOJ was making plans Monday evening to return the passports and have also alerted defense lawyers the FBI may have obtained materials covered by various privileges that will be returned in the next two weeks, two sources told Just the News.

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Tennessee Civil Asset Forfeiture Brought in $16M in Funds in 2021, But Transparency Lacking

Police traffic stop

In 2021, law enforcement in Tennessee seized $16 million worth of cash and $15.8 million was forfeited in court. But according to annual reports from Tennessee’s Department of Safety and Homeland Security, departments used just $195,000 of those funds.

Each year since Tennessee law began requiring those disclosures in 2018, similar numbers have appeared.

In 2020, $15 million was seized, $8.4 million was forfeited in the courts but just $1,980 was recorded as being used. In 2019, $12 million was seized, $12 million was forfeited and just more than $300,000 of the proceeds were used.

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Electronic Security Question to be on Michigan’s November Ballot

Michigan Supreme Court

Michigan voters will see a question on the Nov. 3 ballot asking whether police should need a warrant to search electronic data.

The federal and state Constitution protects against unreasonable search and seizure of people’s “houses, papers, and effects” without a warrant.

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Commentary: Congress Needs to Put a Stop to Asset Forfeiture

Members of Congress brought renewed attention to a legislative effort to halt efforts by the Department of Justice to restart one of the most controversial civil forfeiture practices, so-called “adoptive” forfeitures. The practice, part of the equitable sharing program, allows state and local law enforcement to seize property in their…

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