Nissan Moves Production Back to U.S.A. With Smyrna, Tennessee Plant

Nissan began efforts to move production to the United States on Tuesday by manufacturing the 2021 Rogue in Smyrna, Tennessee.
Nissan predicts the Rogue’s longstanding popularity will lead to its “turnaround as the company’s top-selling U.S. model,” according to their press release.

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Commentary: President Trump Is Right to Question Why Important Parts of the F-35 Are Built Outside of America

The fifth-generation F-35 stealth fighter jet by Lockheed Martin has been in development since the 1990s, one of the most expensive military systems ever at a cost of about $80 million per plane, after all these years is still dependent on global supply chains including certain Chinese-made components and rare earth minerals.

From the beginning of the program the U.S., the United Kingdom, Canada, Denmark, the Netherlands, Norway, Italy, Turkey, and Australia have all participated in financing and producing the plane.

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Report: U.S. Companies Adapting to Produce Coronavirus Supplies Will Reverse Globalization

Solvay, a polymer-specialist company in the mid-Ohio Valley with operations in Washington and Pleasants counties, has partnered with Paragon, a medical-supplies development company to create a special shield for health care workers.

Officials at Memorial Health System told local news outlets they are grateful for the new equipment and for the innovations of U.S. companies that have quickly manufactured necessary equipment needed in the fight against the coronavirus. They said they will continue to use the equipment even after the coronavirus subsides.

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Commentary: Wuhan Virus Exposes the Danger of Reliance Upon China

The time for pundits and policymakers to get serious about preventing the spread of the Wuhan Virus in America was late January. That was when it became clear that China was facing a serious new public health threat. It was also the time when the one piece of data, an exponentially growing number of infected people, was genuinely terrifying. There was so little information beyond that at the time that one could envision a worst-case scenario of a new virus as infectious as the measles and as deadly as SARS (10 percent mortality rate) or MERS (35 percent).

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