Virginia Police Advocate: Breonna’s Law Too Broad, but Not All Bad

Governor Ralph Northam ceremonially signed “Breonna’s Law” on Monday. The law bans no-knock warrants and is named after Breonna Taylor, a Kentucky resident who was killed in her home in March by police. It also bans night-time search warrants without authorization by a judge or magistrate. But Virginia police advocates say the law is too broad — a wholesale ban on a law enforcement tool that they say is already rarely used.

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Community Oversight Board Declares Use of Force Consent Decrees for Metro Police

The Community Oversight Board (COB) approved a report issuing use of force consent decree recommendations. Metro Nashville Police Department (MNPD) will work with the COB to implement these recommendations.
Mayor John Cooper tasked members within the Community Oversight Board to explore use of force policies following the deaths of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor.

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Kentucky State’s New ‘W.O.K.E.’ Task Force Distributes Black Lives Matter Shirts

Kentucky State University is encouraging students to wear Black Lives Matter t-shirts as part of their “W.O.K.E.” task force initiative.

After no officers were charged directly related to the death of Breonna Taylor, the school announced on September 24 that it would create a task force to help students understand Black issues and fight against perceived injustice.

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Over 120 Arrests Recorded at Louisville Riots, Reports Say

Over 120 people were arrested during riots in Louisville, Kentucky following a grand jury decision to charge one of three officers involved in the death of Breonna Taylor, who was killed during the execution of a narcotics warrant in March.

A total of 127 people were apprehended between Wednesday and Thursday for damaging businesses, jumping on city vehicles and violating curfew, according to the Associated Press. Garbage crews have since begun to clear the damage reportedly caused by rioters, AP reported.

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Ohio State University President Sparks Controversy with Breonna Taylor Statement

In a video statement posted on Twitter Wednesday, Ohio State University President Kristina Johnson ignited controversy with a statement about Breonna Taylor.

In the 45 second clip Johnson said:

“Breonna Taylor deserves justice, and this does not feel like justice. We cannot accept what has happened in Louisville, we grieve the tragic and senseless loss of Breonna Taylor, a daughter, a friend, a niece, a loved one, who was unarmed and asleep. The breakdown in the justice system and the killings of unarmed Black and Brown people in our country has become all too familiar, tragically. This isn’t going to stop until we create an anti-racist world. We must come together to draw strength from each other and advance our collective vision for a better world where we’ll one day have justice for all. There is much work to be done.”

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Protesters Arrested in Louisville After Grand Jury Indicts Only One of Three Officers in Breonna Taylor Shooting

In a decision that has inflamed Black Lives Matter activists in Louisville, a grand jury has indicted only one of three officers involved in  the March 13 fatal police shooting of 26-year-old Breonna Taylor.

Former detective Brett Hankison was indicted on three counts of wanton endangerment for showing “extreme indifference to human life” when he fired his gun into three apartments. The charges were not for killing Taylor, but for putting her neighbors in danger.

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Media Focus on Driver Who Hit Agitator During Louisville ‘Protest’ That Led to 17 Arrests

A small but chaotic protest in Louisville, Kentucky, last Wednesday led to seventeen arrests, five cars towed, and one confiscated gun, but for some reason, the local media initially focused like a laser beam on a panicked woman in a car that struck a “protester.”

Louisville has seen unrest since May 28 over the shooting of 26-year-old Breonna Taylor, a unarmed black woman killed by police during a shootout in her apartment. The incident happened during a no-knock raid for drugs in her apartment on March 13.

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Memphis Police Department to Stop Using No-Knock Warrants

The Memphis Police Department has decided to stop using “no-knock” warrants in the wake of the fatal shooting of a black Kentucky woman by narcotics detectives who burst into her home.

Memphis police spokeswoman Karen Rudolph said the move to eliminate no-knock warrants had been a source of discussion since the death of 26-year-old Breonna Taylor, who was killed in March after police detectives smashed through her front door while serving a drug warrant in Louisville.

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Kanye West Attends Chicago Protest, Donates $2M to Victims

Kanye West has donated $2 million to support the families and legal teams for George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery and Breonna Taylor.

A representative for the rapper confirmed that some of the money donated would fully cover college tuition costs for Floyd’s 6-year-old daughter, Gianna. Floyd died last month after a Minneapolis police officer pressed his knee on his neck for more than eight minutes as he pleaded for air.

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