Metro Nashville City Council Considers Street Parking Overhauls: Implementing License Plate Scanners to Eliminating Free Parking on Sundays and Holidays

Metro Nashville City Council is considering a complete overhaul of street parking through a proposed “Smart Parking Program.” The legislation would overhaul the current street parking system (located as item number 44 under Bills on Second Reading). It would allow contractors to enforce parking violations; shift court date notifications, payment systems, and notice methods to a web and text message-based system; and implement license plate scanner technology. It would abolish free parking on Sundays and holidays, the use of coin-operated meters, and free parking perks for carbon neutral vehicles. 

The bill also insisted on updating the term “meter maids” to “parking enforcement patrol.” The sponsors of the bill are Council members Freddie O’Connell, Robert Nash, Tonya Hancock, and Ginny Welsch. 

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Three Council Members Want Nashville Police Chief to Resign

Several council members in Tennessee have called for the resignation of a police chief after warrants were issued for two community activists and then later rescinded.

Metro Council member Freddie O’Connell last week urged Nashville Mayor John Cooper to request the resignation of Metro Police Chief Steve Anderson, news outlets reported.

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Nashville Health Department to Continue Sharing COVID-19 Patient Data with Law Enforcement

The Metro Public Health Department in Nashville will still provide COVID-19 patient information to first responders and law enforcement.

Metro Public Health Director Michael Caldwell said the practice is “temporary,” but that it’s working, WPLN reported Thursday.

“This is an emergency,” he says. “This is critical, timely, life-saving information that has reduced and contained the spread of this disease within our medical institutions and within our jails. I’m puzzled by why the state reversed course.”

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Nashville Buses Get $9 Million, Despite Apparent Lack of Use

Federal taxpayers will hand over more than $9 million so Nashville officials can replace the city’s fleet of buses for its public transportation system. This, despite a recent WSMV investigation showing Nashvillians don’t use existing buses as often as one might assume. According to a recent U.S. Department of Transportation…

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