Wisconsin Hunters Disappointed in Evers’ Hunting, Fishing Vetoes

hunter standing next to his hunting dog at dusk

Add one of Wisconsin’s largest hunting groups to the list of people upset at Gov. Tony Evers’ latest vetoes.

Hunter Nation on Friday said the governor turned his back on hunters in the state by vetoing three proposed laws that would have given people more opportunity to get into the field or out on the water.

“Gov. Evers has sent a clear message that he simply doesn’t care about Wisconsin’s outdoor traditions and would rather partner with anti-hunting groups to trample our long-held traditions,” Hunter Nation CEO Luke Hilgemann said.

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Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency Requests Public Input for 2022-2024 Hunting Regulations

man in hunting gear with dog

The Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA) is welcoming comments for its 2022-24 hunting regulations, according to a Friday press release by the agency. This is an opportunity for the public to share ideas, comments, and make suggestions about hunting season dates, bag limits, wildlife management area (WMA) regulations, and more.

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Hunters Urge Wisconsin DNR to Appeal Judge’s Ruling, Reinstate 2021 Wolf Hunt

pack of wolves

Hunters in Wisconsin are pleading with the state’s Department of Natural Resources to save this year’s wolf hunt.

A Dane County judge on Friday issued an order that essentially ends this year’s hunt. The judge said Wisconsin’s wolf quota should be zero, not the 130 that DNR regulators approved this fall.

“I’m not overruling the wolf hunt law, I’m not saying it’s enjoined from ever being enforced,” Judge Jacob Frost wrote in his ruling. “In fact I’m saying that it has to be enforced as it was written and intended.”

Frost sided with environmentalists and advocates who’ve been fighting Wisconsin’s wolf hunting law for years. Frost’s ruling, however, singles out the DNR for failing to adopt formal wolf hunting rules since lawmakers approved a wolf hunt back in 2012.

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Commentary: Wally Funk’s Lifelong Journey to the Stars

Plane flying in the sky

Mary Wallace “Wally” Funk always wanted to fly.  She had her first flying lesson when she was nine years old and grew up making wooden planes, building treehouses, riding horses, biking, hunting, and fishing.  As a young girl growing up in the 1940s and 1950s, Wally recalls, “I did everything that people didn’t expect a girl to do.”   

Wally’s curiosity and love of flying, however, would ultimately shape the rest of her life.  She obtained her flying license at Stephens College when she was in her teens, then joined the “Flying Aggies” aviation team at Oklahoma State University, where she earned a degree in education.  Wally then got her first job at Fort Sill, Oklahoma where she was the only female flight instructor.

At the height of the Space Race, in 1961, when she was just 22 years old, Wally became infatuated with the idea of taking her passion for flying to the next level, as an astronaut in space.  

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Analysis: Progressive Myths About Mass Shootings and Weapons of War

Within a week of blaming “white supremacy” for the murder of six Asian and two white women by a white man in Georgia, progressives are now blaming “assault weapons” for a mass shooting in which a Trump-hating Muslim immigrant with a history of violence, mental illness, and racial animus gunned down 10 white people in a Boulder, Colorado supermarket.

Beyond the duplicity of highlighting race only when the killer is white and the victims are not, progressive lawmakers, activists, and journalists are using a litany of falsehoods in an attempt to ban common semi-automatic guns used for home defense and hunting.

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