Brian Kemp Warns Georgia About Critical Race Theory, but Vernon Jones Says He Has a Plan to Get Rid of It Altogether

 

Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp this week submitted a letter to members of the state board of education and warned about the dangers of Critical Race Theory (CRT) in public schools.

But Vernon Jones — Kemp’s declared Republican opponent for next year’s gubernatorial race — also denounced CRT and said, if elected, he’ll do more than just warn about it.

Kemp, in his letter, said parents, students, and administrators throughout Georgia have contacted him about CRT.

“Like me, they are alarmed this divisive and anti-American curriculum is gaining favor in Washington, D.C. and in some states across the country. Furthermore, it is ridiculous that the Biden administration is considering using taxpayer funds to push a blatantly partisan agenda in Georgia classrooms. Parents, educators, and local communities here in the Peach State know how best to educate their students — not the federal government,” Kemp wrote.

“We must instead focus on our goal of providing the highest quality education to every child in Georgia, without partisan bias or political influence. Education in Georgia should reflect our fundamental values as a state and nation — freedom, equality, and the God-given potential of each individual. State Board of Education members, I urge you to take immediate steps to ensure that Critical Race Theory and its dangerous ideology do not take root in our state standards or curriculum.”

Jones, in an emailed press release, said he already addressed CRT nearly three weeks ago. He tweeted on May 3 that he would issue an executive order to ban CRT in public schools — on his first day in office.

“When will Mr. Kemp take action that will actually protect our children from this?” Jones asked in the press release.

Georgia Attorney General Chris Carr said this week he’s joining 20 other attorneys general and urging the Biden Administration to reconsider proposals that would impose the teaching of CRT and the 1619 Project in America’s classrooms. U.S. Department of Education officials have woven such goals into a proposed rule that establishes priorities for grants in American history and civics education programs.

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Chris Butler is an investigative journalist at The Tennessee Star. Follow Chris on Facebook. Email tips to [email protected]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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