Lee Signs Budget Appropriations Bill That Includes $500 Million for New Tennessee Titans Stadium

Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee signed an appropriations bill that includes $500 million toward a new Tennessee Titans stadium on Wednesday.

The bill is part of a $52.8 billion budget for the state. The $500 million in bonds for the domed stadium will require $55 million in annual payments.

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New Study Ranks Tennessee Roads in Top 10 List of ‘Most Dangerous’ in the Country

New research by 1-800 Injured shows that Tennessee roads rank as some of the most dangerous in the country. For the study, states were ranked based on an index of fatality rates per 100,000 people, per 100 million vehicle miles traveled, and per 100,000 licensed drivers to determine a “Road Danger Rating”.

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Report: As Overdose Deaths Rise in Pennsylvania, Fentanyl Displaces Heroin

Fentanyl dominates Pennsylvania and has surpassed heroin as the major opioid in the commonwealth, posing greater health risks to those who use it and creating a bigger problem for law enforcement.

That’s according to a new report from the Pennsylvania attorney general’s office warning the public of rising overdose deaths and the threat opioids pose to public health.

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Connecticut Child Tax Credit Program Accepting Applications

Connecticut’s child tax credit program is now taking applications, Gov. Ned Lamont said.

The governor announced the application period for the 2022 Connecticut Child Tax Rebate will accept applications through July 31. The rebate was developed within the budget bill Lamont signed last month and provides a rebate of up to $250 per child up to three children.

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Data Researcher ‘Shocked’ at Death Rate Among Working-Age Minnesotans

A researcher in Minnesota discovered shocking increases in death rates in the state, with year-over-year averages proving to be “astoundingly” high for younger age groups.

Researcher Marana Muse joined Liz Collin on her podcast once again to discuss her findings on death data, vaccines and COVID-19 testing in Minnesota.

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Del. Dawn Adams: Budget Legalizes Marijuana Retail ‘Straight Up’

Delegate Dawn Adams (D-Richmond) was among a bipartisan group of seven delegates who voted against the budget on Wednesday. Adams criticized the Youngkin administration’s policies for state employees, but focused on language in the budget proposal that fails to adequately regulate THC in retail marijuana.

“We are now legalizing retail marijuana straight up. That’s what we’re doing. It’s just we’re going to call it hemp. And you can call it hemp, but it’s marijuana, and specifically until you have regulations, that does of marijuana that is now legal in retail stores can be anything as long as they put it on the package,” Adams, a nurse practitioner, said in a speech to the House of Delegates.

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DeSantis Vetoes Bills He Says Waste Taxpayer Money

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis vetoed two bills and several lines of another as part of what he said is his ongoing commitment to fiscal stewardship.

The bills in question were passed by the legislature during the regular session earlier this year. As the bills are sent to the governor for his consideration, he said he’s been going through them to exercise his line-item veto authority.

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Michigan Railroads Get $30 Million Federal Grant

U.S. Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg announced $368 million in rail infrastructure grants to 46 projects in 32 states, including about $30 million for two Michigan rail projects.

“Americans deserve a world-class rail system that allows people and goods to get where they need to go more quickly and affordably, while reducing traffic and pollution on our roads,” Buttigieg said at the Mackinac Policy Conference. “We’re proud to award these grants to improve passenger rail for riders and strengthen the freight rail that makes our supply chains and our economy work.”

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Ohio’s Capital Budget Riddled with Incentives, Pork Projects

Working late into the night this week, the Ohio General Assembly passed its traditional capital budget, spending billions on statewide initiatives, business and industry incentives and pet projects for lawmakers.

House Bill 687 included money for state parks and the incentives for Intel’s planned $20 billion investment in two chip-making plants in central Ohio. Gov. Mike DeWine called the bill an historic investment.

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ACLU Says Georgia’s New Voting Law Is a Burden for Local Governments, State Officials Disagree

The delayed certification of DeKalb County’s May 24 election is proof that Georgia’s new voting law is burdening local officials, the ACLU of Georgia says.

However, state officials disagree with the organization, saying the state’s new election law has no bearing on local elections issues.

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California Reparations Report Demands Tree Planting in ‘Black Neighborhoods’ for ‘Shade Equity’

A report on alleged systemic racism released Wednesday and greenlit by Democratic California Gov. Gavin Newsom is calling for the planting of trees statewide “to create shade equity” and reduce “heat islands in black neighborhoods.”

The 500-page report was released after Newsom signed legislation in 2020 forming a nine-member task force to “inform Californians about slavery and explore ways the state might provide reparations.” It describes tree demolishing in black neighborhoods for highway construction and says climate change makes these areas hotter.

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Report: Republicans Jockey for Leadership Role as House Expected to Flip

A number of Republican members of Congress are gearing up to launch a bid for GOP whip, should the House flip in November, Politico reported Thursday.

Indiana Republican Rep. Jim Banks has allegedly called up fellow Republicans in the House to get a picture of the type of support he would have if he made the attempt, three GOP sources told Politico.

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Recession Worries Rising Among Economists

Recession worries are rising among economists as inflation continues at high levels.

A top Moody’s economist has predicted a recession could hit within the next two years, but others are saying it could happen sooner.

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Virginia Budget Deal Cuts School Choice Program by More than Half

The Virginia budget deal, which passed both chambers of the General Assembly, would cut funding for a school choice tax credit program by more than half of its current funding.

The Education Improvement Scholarships Tax Credits Program provides a 65% tax credit for individuals or businesses who make donations for scholarships to students so they can attend certain private schools and nonpublic preschool programs. Current law caps the state funding for the program at $25 million per year, but a provision in the budget proposal would reduce that cap to only $12 million per year.

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Georgia Senate Committees to Study Growth of Electric Vehicles Statewide and HBCU Expansion

Several state Senate committees will explore topics ranging from the electrification of transportation to how the state can support growth at historically Black colleges and universities.

The Joint Study Committee on the Electrification of Transportation, established by Senate Resolution 463 and running until the end of the year, will, in part, explore how to build electric vehicle charging infrastructure across the state. Georgia officials have announced more than 20 EV-related projects since 2020.

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Biden Administration Department of Health and Human Services Announces New Environmental Justice Office

The Biden Administration’s Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is announcing the creation of a new “Office of Environmental Justice,” meant to focus on so-called “global warming’s” impact on minorities.

As reported by Just The News, the new office will determine ways to “better protect the health of disadvantaged communities and vulnerable populations on the frontlines of pollution and other environmental health issues.”

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Arizona Senate Race a Dead Heat, Poll Shows

The U.S. Senate race in Arizona this year is a tossup, an Arizona Public Opinion Pulse poll conducted by OH Predictive Insights shows.

Arizona voters have a split opinion of incumbent Democratic U.S. Sen. Mark Kelly; he has a 50% approval rating, including a 49% approval rating from self-described independents. Meanwhile, 39% disapprove of Kelly.

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New York GOP Rep. Chris Jacobs Will Not Seek Re-Election After Gun Control Support Backlash

New York GOP Rep. Chris Jacobs announced on Friday that he would not seek re-election after his support for an assault weapons ban generated backlash within his own party.

Jacobs announced last week, in the wake of a mass shooting in Buffalo, N.Y., that he would back a federal ban on assault weapons and high-capacity magazines, according to the New York Times. Jacobs represents the 27th Congressional District of New York, which includes some of the Buffalo suburbs.

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Government Report Admits Dominion Voting Machines Are Vulnerable in 16 States

A government agency has claimed that voting machines used in at least 16 states by an infamous vendor have software vulnerabilities that could compromise them in future elections.

According to ABC News, the report by the U.S. Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Agency (CISA) admitted that the machines, provided by Dominion Voting Systems, are susceptible to hacking if the current vulnerabilities are not addressed. The report details at least nine specific weaknesses and suggests several measures to prevent further exploitation of these flaws.

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Universal Licensing Netted Arizona Several Thousand Jobs, Study Finds

Arizona took a nation-leading step into universal occupational licensing. A new study says it’s resulted in significant job growth. 

In 2019, Arizona became the first state in the country with universal license recognition; if someone has a work license in another state, they can use that license in Arizona. Since then, 4,723 new work licenses have been issued under the law, according to a study conducted by the Common Sense Institute and the Goldwater Institute.

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Professors in Viral Clip from Daily Wire’s ‘What is a Woman?’ Film Teaches at University of Tennessee

A professor featured in a viral clip from Daily Wire’s film “What is a Woman?” is an Associate Professor and the Chairman of the Interdisciplinary Program in Women, Gender, and Sexuality at the University of Tennessee – Knoxville. 

In the clip, which has been viewed at least two million times on Twitter alone, Daily Wire’s Matt Walsh asks Dr. Patrick Grzanka to define the term “woman.” 

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