Billboard Chart-Topping Conservative Hip-Hop Artist Topher Tells Americans to ‘Keep the Faith’ and ‘God Is the Answer’

NASHVILLE, Tennessee – Billboard topping conservative hip-hop artist Topher has a simple message that he shared with The Tennessee Star in an exclusive interview for Americans going through tough times due to the Biden administration’s disastrous governance of our nation: “Keep the Faith.”

Topher emphasized to The Star that Americans need to rely on God and that conservatives are not alone in their beliefs.

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Tennessee to Receive $5 Million in Settlement with Pharmaceutical Company

Tennessee will receive approximately $5 million from a settlement with pharmaceutical company Mallinckrodt, according to a release from Attorney General Herbert Slatery.

In total, the company will be required to pay more than $233 million over the next seven years to all 50 states, Puerto Rico, Washington D.C., and the federal government.

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Governor Lee Announces Recipients of the 2022 Governor’s Environmental Stewardship Awards

On Thursday, Tennessee Governor Bill Lee and Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) Commissioner David Salyers announced the winners of the 2022 Governor’s Environmental Stewardship Awards.

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Commentary: White House Border Policy Racks Up Losses in Court

Joe Biden in 2020 promised he would return “normalcy” to the White House, that the adults would be back in charge, and that America would enter a new era of prosperity. In other news, the Titanic is an unsinkable ship and Enron stock is the foundation of a solid investment portfolio.

It is becoming difficult for even the most partisan Biden supporter to put a positive spin on the current administration’s growing list of failures. The centerpiece of the White House’s calamity is its immigration policy, which is deeply unpopular with a majority of Americans. It is even less popular in America’s courts, where judges continue to reject Biden’s attempt to impose a unilateral vision of a borderless country and all the suffering that comes with it.

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Jason Maxedon Named New Executive Director of the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency

Jason Maxedon was named executive director of the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA), the department announced Thursday in a press release. As executive director, Maxedon has exclusive supervisory control of the agency and is responsible for planning, directing, and coordinating its activities. The commission serves as the governing body of the TWRA, the department notes.

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Hennepin County Surveys Inmates on ‘Quality of Life,’ Refers to Them as ‘Residents’

An internal survey given to inmates at the Hennepin County Adult Corrections Facility refers to them as “residents.”

The survey, sent to all incarcerated inmates in May, asked for feedback on the correctional facility’s current conditions, living standards, quality of care, programs, and services.

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Commentary: What The Washington Post Knew About Watergate and When They Knew It Was the Real Coverup

On the 50th anniversary of the still-fascinating Watergate scandal, the media continues to portray it untruthfully, albeit often unwittingly so, with the focus as always on the unattractive persona of Richard Nixon. But was Nixon—who, to be sure, did commit two relatively minor acts of obstruction—the person most responsible for withholding the true story from our country? 

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Governor DeSantis Takes Action to Curb Impact of Border Crisis

Florida Governor Ron DeSantis took a series of actions to curb the impact of the ongoing border crisis on the residents of the state.

According to a release from his office, DeSantis created “a strike force of state and local law enforcement to interdict human smuggling, human trafficking, and to seize illegal weapons.”

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Virginia Attorney General Offers Help in Prosecution After Judge Kicks Local Prosecutor off Case

Virginia Attorney General Jason Miyares is offering to help prosecute a criminal case in northern Virginia after a judge removed the local prosecutor from the case.

The court removed Loudoun County Commonwealth’s Attorney Buta Biberaj from prosecuting a case after alleging she misrepresented the facts so the judge would grant the defendant a lighter sentence.

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Alluding to Fetterman, Senator Proposes Requiring Officials to Notify Pennsylvania Executive and Legislature of Health Emergencies

State Sen. David Argall (R-PA-Mahanoy City) last week proposed a rule that Pennsylvania’s statewide elected officials must disclose urgent medical conditions to the governor and legislative leaders.

He indirectly mentioned the most recent example of a statewide elected official who apparently neglected to disclose a life-threatening condition: Lt. Gov. John Fetterman (D). Now a candidate for the U.S. Senate to replace the retiring Republican Pat Toomey, Fetterman suffered a stroke four days before the May 17 primary.

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Kemp Touts 1,100-Acre Development of ‘The Middle Georgia Megasite’

Georgia Governor Brian P. Kemp announced on Wednesday the purchase of a 1,100-acre economic development site that will be the location of the “Middle Georgia Megasite.”

“Even after announcing the two largest projects in the State’s history back-to-back, we remain focused on attracting key industries and investment by providing the project sites companies need,” said Governor Brian Kemp in a press release.

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DeWine to Ohio Superintendents: $100 Million Budgeted for School Safety Grants

Ohio schools will receive $100 million in total to purchase security equipment as part of the next round of K-12 School Safety Grants, Gov. Mike DeWine (R) wrote to superintendents on Friday.

The allocations, which come as a part of the state’s capital budget bill that DeWine signed into law last week, will go toward purchases such as outdoor lighting, facility-mapping software, school-radio systems, door-locking technology and visitor-badge systems. The Ohio School Safety Center in Columbus is now drafting the application for schools to access this money and expects to soon start the application process.

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Arizona Attorney General Brnovich Leads 24 States Objecting to SEC Requiring Climate Change Disclosures by Businesses

Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich is leading a coalition of 24 states objecting to proposed rule changes by the U.S. Securities & Exchange Commission (SEC) that would require publicly-traded businesses to disclose information about their greenhouse gas emissions and discuss climate risks. The coalition filed formal comments indicating the 500-page rule titled “The Enhancement and Standardization of Climate-Related Disclosures for Investors” goes beyond the jurisdiction of the SEC and into environmental regulation. 

In a 44-page letter addressed to the SEC, Brnovich and the others stated that the Biden “administration has tried and failed to impose regulation directly, and it now appears content to use back-door financial regulatory actions to implement its political will.” The coalition warned, “profit will become secondary to political interests, and capitalism will fall by the wayside.” The proposed rule “seeks to make ‘decisions of vast economic and political significance.’” They accused the SEC of “taking on major policy decisions that belong to Congress.” 

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Gordon Chang Commentary: The Chinese Economy Is Collapsing

Chinese ruler Xi Jinping has staked his rule on making China larger, by annexing neighbors. Taiwan is not his only target. He needs success to assure a precedent-breaking third term as the Communist Party’s general secretary, but the Chinese people, preoccupied by a failing economy, are in no mood for their leader’s aggression.

We start with the Party’s storyline that the relaxation of COVID-19 lockdowns is leading to an economic revival.

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Thousands of Californians Moving to Mexico to Escape High Taxes, Costs of Living

Of the 360,000 Californians who have fled the deep-blue state in the last year alone, a significant portion are moving to a rather surprising destination to find cheaper costs of living: Across the border in Mexico.

According to the Washington Examiner, California remains one of the most expensive states to live in, with a median housing price of $787,470. In most cities, the yearly property tax is at least $14,000. As a result, many households have failed to pay their property taxes, with at least 2 million delinquent homes in Los Angeles County alone.

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Tech Company Slack Bans Conservative Group from Using Its Platform

On Wednesday, the tech company Slack announced that it had banned a conservative immigration restrictionist group from using its services, allegedly for violations of the platform’s “terms of service.”

The Washington Free Beacon reports that Slack, a messaging app designed specifically for professional and workplace use, did not offer any specific reasoning for their ban, nor an explanation of which terms of service were violated, when they banned the Federation for American Immigration Reform (FAIR).

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Commentary: College Enrollment Drops as Students Seek Alternatives

The past two years have been marked by major education disruption at the K-12 level, as more families questioned the schooling status quo during prolonged school closures and remote learning. They left district schools in droves, choosing instead to become independent homeschoolers, join learning pods and microschools, or find high-quality virtual learning platforms. 

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Iowa Supreme Court Rules State Constitution Doesn’t Guarantee Fundamental Right to Abortion

The Iowa Supreme Court ruled Friday the Iowa Constitution does not guarantee a fundamental right to abortion.

The Court’s decision overruled its 2018 determination in Planned Parenthood of the Heartland v Reynolds, which an Iowa Supreme Court judge had cited in striking down a law that required women to wait 24 hours before getting an abortion.

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George Washington University Dumps ‘Colonials’ Nickname

George Washington University, located in the heart of the nation’s capital, is ditching the moniker “Colonials” in favor of a campus-wide nickname that will better “unite” the campus community.

The decision was announced Wednesday by the Office of the President after the Board of Trustees voted to toss the name, a move that came at the recommendation of The Board and Special Committee on the Colonials Moniker.

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Microsoft Retires Internet Explorer After 30 Years of Service

Internet Explorer, the longtime web browser that led countless users onto the early Internet on Microsoft operating systems, is officially no longer compatible with Windows, the company announced this week.

In a blog post on Microsoft’s website, Sean Lyndersay—the general manager to the Windows web browser Microsoft Edge Enterprise—explained the decision by nothing that “the web has evolved and so have browsers.”

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Hillary Clinton Bows Out of 2024 Rematch with Trump

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton says she will not run for president in 2024, ending speculation for a possible rematch with Donald Trump eight years later.

In an interview with the Financial Times, Clinton said she expects President Joe Biden to run for reelection and does not want to get in the way of that.

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New Arizona Law Expands Eligible Bus Driver Pool

After years of struggling to hire and retain school bus drivers, Arizona lawmakers and Gov. Doug Ducey hope to have enacted a solution.

“Drivers with a CDL are in high demand, and we’re losing them to big companies like Amazon and FedEx. A mixture of outdated federal and state laws are only exacerbating the problem,” said Sen. Sine Kerr, R-Maricopa, “Children are experiencing big delays in their pick-ups, field trips and athletic events are being canceled, parents are forced to drive inordinate distances to get their children to class, drivers are working sometimes 15-hour days to combat the shortage, and administrators are being forced to pick up some of the workload themselves.”

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Over 2,000 Cattle Die from Heat, Humidity in Kansas

The already struggling meat industry suffered another blow after extreme temperatures in Kansas killed at least 2,000 cattle across the state.

As reported by The Daily Caller, the estimated total of dead cattle comes from facilities that reached out to the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (DHE) for help in disposing of the carcasses. The Kansas Livestock Association said that the cause of death was heat stress as a result of extremely high temperatures and humidity.

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Republicans Introduce Bill to Defund John Kerry, Other Biden ‘Climate Tyrants’

Eight Republican House members have introduced legislation to defund climate czar John Kerry and other “climate tyrants“ inside the Biden administration, blaming them for an energy crisis that has sent gasoline soaring to $5 a gallon.

The group, led by Rep. Chip Roy of Texas, introduced the No Taxpayer Funding for CZARS Act that would ban federal funding for any activity of the special presidential envoy for climate, including salary and both administrative and travel expenses.

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Report: World’s First Trillionaires Could Be from Texas

The world’s first trillionaires could be from Texas, according to a new analysis of the 30 richest people in the world.

A new report published by the software company Tipalti Approve estimates that newly relocated Texas resident, Tesla CEO and billionaire Elon Musk, could become the world’s first trillionaire by 2024. Houston native and Dell Technologies CEO Michael Dell could become a trillionaire by 2033.

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Lawmakers Say Documents Show DHS Head Misled Congress About Disinformation Board, Demand Hearing

Several Republican senators are demanding a hearing saying they received documents from a Department of Homeland Security whistleblower about the agency’s new disinformation governance board that allegedly show DHS Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas misled a Senate committee when he testified about the board last month.

The lawmakers sent a letter this week to Sen. Gary Peters, D-Mich., chairman of the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee asking for a hearing on the issue where Mayorkas could come back for questioning.

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Pennsylvania Makes It Easier for Foreign Nurses to Get Licensed

A new law in Pennsylvania makes it easier for foreign nurses to get certified in the state, expanding the potential pool of health-care workers as the state confronts a nursing shortage.

Act 22 updates nursing license requirements by allowing the State Board of Nursing to approve graduates of international nursing programs to sit for the registered nursing examination. So long as the education they received outside the United States meets the state board’s standards, graduates can get licensed much quicker than before.

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