Trump in Pennsylvania: ‘Our Country Is Going to Hell’

President Donald Trump delivered blistering broadsides against Democratic politicians in Pennsylvania on Saturday night, urging voters to cast their ballots for Republicans in November as he declared that, under the Joe Biden administration, “our country is going to hell.”

The president appeared in Wilkes-Barre, Pa., to stump for Republican gubernatorial candidate Doug Mastriano and Senate candidate Mehmet Oz, both of whom he has endorsed.

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Commentary: Expanding Access to Alzheimer’s Treatment

Promising new medicines could soon be available to help patients fend against this disease. Government must ensure Medicare is able to cover them.

Approximately six million Americans are living with some form of Alzheimer’s, a number poised to double over the coming decades. Citizens are living 30 years longer than a century ago, primarily due to incredible advances in the field of medicine. Future opportunities are limitless if we foster an environment that rewards rather than discourages innovation. Unfortunately, that’s not what our leaders in Washington are doing.

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Commentary: My Baby and I Found Love and Care at This Pregnancy Resource Center

They gave me a truck. They gave me food. They gave me a warm bed. They helped me find a job. They loved me when I felt no one else did. And they asked for nothing in return.

One might start contemplating what wealthy relative I stumbled upon to receive such luck and gifts, or maybe what company treats their employees so generously. It was neither.  

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California Democrats Pass Bill That Could Pay Fast Food Workers Up to $22 an Hour

Democratic legislators in California passed a bill on Monday that will create an unelected state-run board to impose minimum wage and working conditions standards on the state’s fast food restaurants.

The bill, known as A.B. 257, will establish a ten-member council, made up of state officials as well as worker and employer representatives, to set employees’ wages, hours and working conditions for California’s entire fast food industry. The bill stipulates that the council has the authority to issue health, safety and anti-discrimination regulations as well as set an industrywide minimum wage of up to $22 per hour, according to the bill’s text.

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Washington School Board Unanimously Bans CRT from the Classroom

A Washington school board approved a policy on Aug. 24 prohibiting the teaching of Critical Race Theory (CRT) in classrooms.

The Kennewick School Board in Kennewick, Washington, voted 5-0 on a policy which bans educators from teaching students CRT or that “their race determines their value or worth.” The policy requires that students learn “factual” U.S. history in all disciplines at school.

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Nashville Rated as One of America’s Best Places to Buy a Home

Nashville was rated as the fifth-best real estate market in the country in a new report from WalletHub.

The finance website rated the country’s top 300 cities based upon 17 factors to gauge the current environment based upon everything from building permits to property appreciation to affordability.

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Men’s Magazine Says Preference for Female Anatomy Is a ‘Fetish’

A sex writer at Men’s Health said that his preference for female bodies was a fetish in a Thursday column.

A male reader wrote that he was exclusively attracted to people with female genitalia and didn’t care about his partners’ gender identity, but wasn’t sure if that made his straight or pansexual. The columnist, Zachary Zane, who identifies as an “ethical boyslut,” told the reader he was technically bisexual and had a fetish for vulvas that his partners might find offensive.

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Hispanic Americans Point to Crime, Immigration and the Economy as Key Concerns

Recent reports indicate a dramatic political shift for Hispanic Americans, citing a defection from the left toward the right. While some mainstream media accounts dispute the shift, other national surveys are missing the on-the-ground factors that illustrate why a sizeable portion of Latinos are moving right politically, and the fact that many polls suggest Hispanics are drifting from the Democratic party over economic issues.

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Commentary: The Federal Government’s Bungled Census Is Bad News for Red States

If a politician from Florida decides to run for president in 2024, his (or her) home state will be short two votes in the Electoral College, and when the new session of the U.S. House of Representatives convenes in January 2023, Florida will be missing two congressional seats to which it is entitled.

Why? Because according to a post-2020 census survey, the U.S. Census Bureau significantly undercounted the population of Florida, as well as Arkansas, Illinois, Mississippi, Tennessee and Texas. At the same time, it overcounted the population of eight states, all but one of which is a blue state.

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Lithium-Based Company Announces $582 Million Investment in Southeast Tennessee

Piedmont Lithium officials announced Thursday that the company would invest $582 million to establish a lithium hydroxide processing, refining, and manufacturing facility in Etowah.

The new facility will be located at the North Etowah Industrial Park, creating 117 new jobs in McMinn County. According to the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development (TNECD), the facility will be America’s largest “lithium hydroxide processing” facility.

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Student Enrollments Down, Administrator Hires up in Pennsylvania

A new report questions the narrative of a “teacher shortage” in Pennsylvania, pointing out significant declines in student enrollments even as public school employment has risen.

“Since 2000, Pennsylvania public school enrollment has dropped 6.6% (120,000 fewer students); but public schools have added 20,000 more employees (8.7% growth), including nearly 40% growth among administrators,” the Commonwealth Foundation noted in its Back to School Education Trends report.

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Wisconsin Republicans Bash Elections Commission Request for Internal Inspector

Republican lawmakers at the Wisconsin Capitol are pretty much dismissing the idea of an inspector general at the state’s Elections Commission from the start.

Elections Commission Administrator Meagan Wolfe on Wednesday asked the Legislature for $1.3 million to create a new inspector general’s office inside the Elections Commission.

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Georgia Teacher Supply Supplement Will Cost $20 Million

Georgia plans to spend about $20 million on a program to give teachers and school employees a $125 bonus, a state official confirmed on Friday.

Georgia announced the “Back-to-School Supply Supplement” program in July. Under the plan, the state will give a $125 supplement to teachers and school staff members “who work to provide instructional and supportive services directly to students on a daily basis.”

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Florida Grants over $125 Million to Counties to Purchase Electric Buses

Florida is expanding its purchase of electric transit and school buses statewide through funding made available from a national 2016-era EPA Volkswagen settlement.

Of the state’s $166 million allotment, more than $68 million was awarded to 13 counties to purchase electric transit buses. More than $57 million was awarded to purchase 218 electric school buses in seven counties.

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Back Pay for 29 Workers Recovered from Akron Employer

The U.S. Department of Labor has recovered $67,294 in unpaid wages for 29 workers after Akron, Ohio, based employer McNeil and NRM Inc. failed to pay them for two and a half months this year.

“Workers cannot be expected to bear the burden of the employer’s financial issues which, in this case, left them wondering if or when they would be paid,” Matthew Utley, director of the Wage and Hour Division District in Columbus, said in a statement, adding, “Any worker not getting paid should contact the Wage and Hour Division immediately.”

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Minnesota Gov. Walz Claims Republicans ‘Naturally Inclined’ to ‘Demonize’ Others

Gov. Tim Walz, running for reelection on a promise of “One Minnesota,” once described Republicans as naturally inclined to “demonize” others before mockingly accusing them of using “The Handmaid’s Tale” as an “operator’s manual.”

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Virginia AG Probing 2020 Election Irregularities as Records Are About to be Destroyed

The Virginia attorney general’s office is investigating 2020 election irregularities nearly two years later as the 22-month waiting period required under federal law to preserve election records ends Saturday and state law requires the records to be destroyed after Labor Day.

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Gov. Whitmer Frees Up Gas Supply in Michigan

Gov. Gretchen Whitmer has taken measures to mitigate the temporary shutdown of BP’s Whiting, Indiana, oil refinery due to a fire that is expected to impact Michigan. 

According to a news release from the governor’s office, Whitmer is hoping to secure fuel supplies for motorists by suspending guidelines on motor vehicle hours-of-service rules. 

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St. Mary’s Food Bank Shares Alarming Rise in Families Seeking Food in Arizona

Jerry Brown, director of public relations for St. Mary’s Food Bank, told The Arizona Sun Times that the number of families seeking food in Arizona has risen in recent months.

“To give you an example at St. Mary’s Food Bank,” Brown said Friday. “We’re still getting the final numbers in for August, but we’re going to come close to 150,000 families served just in the month of August. Something we didn’t do during the pandemic. The height of the pandemic. That’s not something we did during normal holiday years when we hand out a lot of turkeys. We do 18,000 turkeys for families around the holidays. Even those months didn’t result in 150,000 touches with families.”

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Arizona Rep. Andy Biggs Invites White House Press Secretary to Tour of Southern Border

Arizona Rep. Andy Biggs (R-AZ-05) invited the White House Press Secretary, Karine Jean-Pierre, to tour the southern border after she made false claims about border crossings.

“White House Press Secretary Karine Jean-Pierre’s continued dismissal of the nation’s border crisis is outrageous,” Biggs said. “As the chief spokesperson of the President of the United States, she is either deliberately lying to the American public or is utterly unaware of this catastrophe that stretches across the nation’s 2,000-mile border with Mexico.”

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RNC, Lake Respond to ‘Obscene’ Biden Speech

Both gubernatorial candidate Kari Lake, and the Republican National Committee (RNC) on her behalf, responded to President Joe Biden’s Thursday night speech wherein he derided supporters of former President Donald Trump as potential violent threats to the United States. 

Lake said:

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Ohio Already Reaping Millions from Sports Gambling

Sports betting will open in Ohio on Jan. 1, and the state could realize revenues of more than $30 million from fees this year.

Nonrefundable application fees of $9.6 million have already been received according to a report from PlayOhio. Once an application is approved, the vendor must pay a license fee to begin taking bets, then pay an annual fee to continue the license. Licenses are good for five years, at which time the fee structure begins again.

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Hobbs Formally Refuses to Debate Lake in Arizona Governor Race

Democrat Katie Hobbs is refusing to debate Republican Kari Lake in their race for Arizona governor. 

In her response to the Citizens Clean Elections Commission, Hobbs’ campaign said the current secretary of state wouldn’t participate in something that will make Arizona “the butt of late-night TV jokes and national ridicule,” referring to the criticism the rowdy GOP primary debate garnered. 

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Maryland Clinic to Offer Late-Term Abortions Months After Baby Can Survive Outside Womb

An obstetrician-gynecologist is opening an all-trimester abortion clinic in College Park, Maryland, that will perform abortions as late as 34 weeks, or eight and a half months, according to NPR.

The clinic, Partners in Abortion Care, plans to offer late-term abortions to women traveling from states with abortion restrictions in light of Roe v. Wade being overturned, according to NPR. Children are considered “viable,” or likely to survive, at 24 weeks, and at 34 weeks they have a 95% survival rate and the same long-term health outcomes as babies born full-term.

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Commentary: The Reason Conservatives Are Happier than Liberals

It may be one of the most surefire findings in all of social psychology, repeatedly replicated over almost five decades of study: American conservatives say they are much happier than American liberals. They also report greater meaning and purpose in their lives, and higher overall life satisfaction. These links are so solidly evidenced that, for the most part, modern social scientists simply try to explain them. They’ve put forth numerous possible explanations.

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California Social Media Bill Could Force Big Tech to Run Facial Scans on Children

California legislators passed a bill Tuesday that, if signed by Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom, will require social media companies to consider the mental health of minors that use their products before releasing them to the public.

The legislation would require companies to bolster privacy and security measures for products likely to be used by children and to consider and address potential mental health risks they pose to children. The bill comes amid increasing pressure on companies like TikTok and Instagram following a 2021 report that Facebook, Instagram’s parent company, knew its products were harming teenage girls’ mental health but didn’t fix the issues.

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Commentary: Catholics, Log Off

The fight against Lucifer was going pretty well – until the devilish enginery appeared. As John Milton depicts the battle of Satan’s rebellious angels against the forces of Heaven in his epic poem “Paradise Lost,” the demons were on the backfoot, until they devise “implements of mischief” that will “dash/To pieces, and orewhelm whatever stands/Adverse, that they shall fear we have disarmd/The Thunderer of his only dreaded bolt.”

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