Twitter Docs Released by Musk and Journalist Suggest Democrats Could Manipulate Speech on Platform

Twitter owner Elon Musk, through alternative journalist Matt Taibbi, released a series of internal documents on Friday suggesting that the Biden campaign and Democratic National Committee were able to manipulate speech on the platform through tools that Twitter made available.

That manipulation included the censorship of the Hunter Biden laptop story first reported by the New York Post. The emails appear to cite requests from “the Biden team” and “DNC” and include confirmations that Twitter “handled” their requests to delete posts.

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Tea Party Patriots Action Chairman Jenny Beth Martin Comments on Georgia Senate Runoff Election

Friday morning on The Tennessee Star Report, host Leahy welcomed Tea Party Patriots Action, Honorary Chairman, Jenny Beth Martin to the newsmaker line to comment upon the Georgia senate runoff election and the importance for Republicans to get out the vote.

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Convention of States Action Head Mark Meckler Talks Blue and Red States Shift, Americans Voting with Feet

Friday morning on The Tennessee Star Report, host Leahy welcomed Convention of States Action head, Mark Meckler to the newsmaker line to discuss the migration of conservatives from blue to red states and how blue states are becoming bluer as Americans vote with their feet.

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Bill O’Reilly Talks About His New Book, Killing the Legends

Friday morning on The Tennessee Star Report, host Leahy welcomed the host of the O’Reilly Factor and author, Bill O’Reilly to the newsmaker line to talk about his new book, Killing the Legends.

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Crom’s Crommentary: Concerns for Government Ramped Up Spending in a Lame Duck Session

Friday morning on The Tennessee Star Report, host Leahy welcomed the original all-star panelist Crom Carmichael to the studio for another edition of Crom’s Crommentary.

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Election Lawsuits Pile up in Arizona, as Counties, Candidates Challenge 2022 Midterms

As the 2022 midterm election is nearing certification in Arizona, lawsuits and court rulings are piling up amid continuing revelations of myriad failures in the administration of the election in Maricopa County.

After Maricopa experienced a host of problems on Election Day at many of its vote centers, one county subsequently chose not to certify its election by the Monday deadline, while another county certified “under duress,” according to two supervisors on the county board.

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U.S. Senate Joins House in Enacting Rail Contracts to Avert Strike

The U.S. Senate on Thursday passed legislation to avert a nationwide railroad workers’ strike, but an Illinois congressman says the government should not be negotiating private sector labor deals.  

The legislation, which was approved by the U.S. House on Wednesday, enacts new contracts providing railroad workers with 24% pay increases over five years, immediate payouts averaging $11,000, and an extra day off.  

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Supreme Court Keeps Biden Student Loan Forgiveness Plan on Hold, Will Hear Case in February

The Supreme Court announced on Thursday that it will hear a lawsuit challenging President Joe Biden’s student loan forgiveness program in February, while the plan currently remains blocked.

The court released a miscellaneous order late Thursday afternoon from Justice Brett Kavanaugh granting the six states involved in the lawsuit the opportunity to present oral arguments. Biden’s student loan forgiveness plan remains blocked by an injunction, pending a further ruling from the court, who will hear arguments in February 2023.

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U.S. Supreme Court to Hear Colorado Case Pitting Speech Rights Against Minority Groups’ Rights

The U.S. Supreme Court will hear oral arguments starting next week in what could be a landmark case centered on a Colorado small business owner’s free speech rights.

Lorie Smith, owner of graphic design company 303 Creative in Littleton, Colo., is challenging the state’s public-accommodation law, which she argues is compelling her speech. Smith wishes to create wedding websites only for straight couples, citing her religious beliefs.

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JPMorgan Strategists Predict Stock Plunge, Recession as Early as First Half of 2023

Strategists at JPMorgan Chase predicted a recession as soon as the first half of 2023, coupled with a major stock market slide, in a research note Thursday, according to Bloomberg.

The strategists expected the S&P 500 stock index to decline roughly 12% in the first half of next year, before rebounding to end 2023 up 3% as inflation cools and the Federal Reserve slows or reverses its aggressive campaign of interest rate hikes, Bloomberg reported. Despite the expectation that the stock market will rebound by the end of next year, the analysts anticipated that U.S. corporate earnings would fall roughly 9% as demand slumps and economic conditions limit companies’ ability to set higher prices.

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Sens. Ron Johnson, Rand Paul Lead Demand for Senate Vote on Ending Military COVID-19 Vaccine Mandate

Senator Ron Johnson (R-WI) and Senator Rand Paul (R-KY) are leading their Republican colleagues in an effort to demand Senate Republican leaders insist on an amendment to the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) that would end the military COVID-19 vaccine mandate.

In a letter Wednesday to Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) and Senators John Thune (R-SD), John Barrasso (RWY), and Roy Blunt (R-MO), Johnson and Paul joined 11 of their Senate GOP colleagues in voicing their opposition to forging ahead with the NDAA for the Fiscal Year 2023 without a Senate vote on an amendment that would ban discharges from the armed services due to failure to take the COVID shot.

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Senator Blackburn Joins Colleagues in Calling on the White House to Reinstate Government-Wide Moratorium On Gain Of Function Research

Tennessee Senator Marsha Blackburn (R-TN) has joined four of her Republican colleagues in sending a letter to the White House demanding that the federal government reinstate a government-wide moratorium on Gain-of-Function Research.

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Ohio House Passes Bill to Decriminalize Fentanyl Test Strips

The Ohio House passed a bill Wednesday, with bipartisan support, that would decriminalize Fentanyl testing strips, pushing forward with a proposal that supporters claim will help prevent fatal overdoses and save lives.

In the state of Ohio Fentanyl drug testing strips are considered drug paraphernalia and it’s illegal for someone to be in possession of them.

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Data: 303 Michigan Schools Haven’t Touched ESSER III COVID Funds

More than 300 Michigan school districts haven’t touched their final tranche of federal COVID money, according to lagging spending data from the Edunomics Lab at Georgetown University.

The data, updated on Oct. 28, 2022, tracks Elementary and Secondary Emergency Relief III spending. It shows that billions of dollars haven’t been spent from more than $5 billion of federal monies given for pandemic learning-loss recovery.

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Georgia Receives $100 Million Federal Grant for Health Care Infrastructure

The feds are sending roughly $100 million to the Georgia Department of Public Health to help it bolster its health infrastructure.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention awarded the DPH $99.8 million over a five-year period for “strengthening public health infrastructure, work force and data systems,” Nancy Nydam, a DPH spokeswoman, told The Center Square. The agency will receive nearly $83.7 million in the first year, and the remaining $16.1 million will be awarded over five years.

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Yale Allegedly Pressured Students with ‘Mental Health’ Issues to Quit Class, Leave School, Lawsuit Claims

Yale University allegedly discriminated against students hospitalized for a mental illness by threatening to unenroll them from courses, according to a lawsuit filed Wednesday by Yale students and alumni.

The lawsuit, filed by Yale’s mental health advocacy group Elis for Rachel and two current students, claims that university officials visited students who were hospitalized for attempted suicide and pressured them to withdraw from classes. The plaintiffs also allege the administrators threatened to forcibly unenroll them if they refused to withdraw voluntarily.

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Commentary: Europe Shows a Clear Link Between Immigration and Crime

Violent crime is becoming common in Sweden, shocking residents of the famously placid Scandinavian nation, where horrific acts of violence have become “all too familiar,” according to Common Sense Media, part of a Swedish nonprofit organization.   

Since 2018, Swedish authorities have recorded an estimated 500 bombings, while what they describe as gang shootings have become increasingly common. The country reported a record 124 homicides in 2020 and many residents were shocked in April when violent riots injured more than 100 police officers.  

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Republican State Senator Introduces Bill Granting Educational Freedom to Ohio Students

An Ohio lawmaker introduced legislation on Tuesday to the General Assembly to expand schooling options for Ohio children.

Senate Bill (SB) 368, sponsored by State Senator Sandra O’Brien (R-Ashtabula), known as the Parental Education Freedom Act, would make each student in the state eligible for an Educational Choice (EdChoice) Scholarship to be used at a private school of their choice, or an increased tax credit for expenses related to homeschooling.

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Georgia Man Receives 25-Year Sentence for Voter Fraud in 2021 Senate Runoff Election

A Georgia man is facing a 25-year prison stretch after being convicted for voting illegally in the 2021 Georgia Senate runoff election. 

William Chase fraudulently submitted a ballot in that election he received by mistake at his PO box, the District Attorney of the Lookout Mountain Judicial Circuit said in a press release.

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Election Integrity Network Releases Extensive List of Discrepancies Reported in Maricopa County Midterm Election, Slams Officials for ‘Misinformation’

The Election Integrity Network (EIN) has compiled a list of reports from election workers, poll watchers, and volunteer attorneys about questionable things they observed during Maricopa County’s midterm election, which experienced rampant tabulation machine and printer problems. EIN Chairman and election integrity attorney Cleta Mitchell denounced Maricopa County officials for “misinformation” regarding how bad the problems really were.

Cleta said, “Maricopa County Board of Supervisors Chairman Bill Gates, Director of Elections Scott Jarrett, and County Recorder Steven Richer presided over a wholly mismanaged and disgraceful election on November 8 that has robbed countless voters of their political voices. Since the polls opened on Election Day, they have misled and misinformed the public about what really happened. But thanks to engaged citizens, we know the truth.”

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Drug Manufacturer Announces $12.5 Million Packaging Center in Virginia

Pharmaceutical manufacturer Granules India, Ltd., announced a $12.5 million investment to create a drug packaging and shipping center in Prince William County. The India-based company manufactures off-patent drugs like ibuprofen and acetaminophen and said the center would help them be more vertically integrated, starting with the initial pharmaceutical component and going to final steps in the process.

“The addition of a U.S. packaging facility will result in Granules being among the few pharmaceutical companies to be vertically integrated from API [active pharmaceutical ingredient] to packaging, which will bolster the robustness of Granules’ supply chain while also enabling the company to react even faster to consumers’ growing needs for pharmaceutical products,” company Founder Dr. Krishna Prasad Chigurupati said in a press release from the governor’s office

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Keefer to Chair Pennsylvania House Freedom Caucus

Pennsylvania’s new House Freedom Caucus announced its initial leaders this week, with state Representative Dawn Keefer (R-Dillsburg) to chair the new organization and Representative David Rowe (R-Mifflinburg) to serve as vice chair. 

Keefer and Rowe were among the 20 GOP members of the Pennsylvania House of Representatives to vote against this fiscal year’s budget, a compromise between the majority-Republican General Assembly and Democratic Governor Tom Wolf which increases state spending by 16.6 percent to $43.7 billion. In remarks to the press, the new caucus’s leaders complained of the extent to which government is growing in the commonwealth and promised to pursue zero-based budgeting as well as regulatory reform. 

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Outgoing Georgia Lieutenant Governor Duncan Says He Didn’t Vote for Either Herschel Walker or Raphael Warnock

Outgoing Lieutenant Governor Geoff Duncan (R) told CNN on Wednesday that he couldn’t bring himself to vote for either Senator Raphael Warnock (D-GA) or Herschel Walker.

“I showed up to vote this morning. I was one of those folks who got in line and spent about an hour waiting. And you know, it was the most disappointing ballot I’ve ever stared at my entire life since I started voting. You know, I had two candidates that I just couldn’t find anything that made sense for me to put my vote behind and so I walked out of that ballot box, showing up to vote, but not voting for either one of them,” Duncan said.

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Experts: Minnesota School District Can Now Conceal Students’ Gender Identity from Parents

The Burnsville-Eagan-Savage School District adopted a new transgender student policy that experts say will permit students to change their gender identity at school and allow the district to conceal that information from parents.

According to the new policy, adopted on Nov. 17, “all students have a right to privacy, including the right to keep private one’s transgender or gender expansive status at school.”

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Florida Takes $2 Billion Away from BlackRock Due to Firm’s Activist Investing Standards

Florida’s Chief Financial Officer Jimmy Patronis announced Thursday that the state will begin pulling over $2 billion in assets from large investment manager BlackRock because of the firm’s environmentally and socially motivated investing standards.

Patronis said that BlackRock is choosing to use its money to pursue its ideology rather than secure profits for its clients, according to a press release. Florida’s State Treasury will begin to remove roughly $1.43 billion worth of long-term securities from BlackRock’s control as well as approximately $600 million worth of short-term investments managed by the firm.

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Victor Davis Hanson Commentary: If You Really Wanted to Destroy the United States, Then . . .

First, you would surrender our prior energy independence. 

Reduce new gas and oil leases on federal lands to the lowest levels of any president in history. Cut back production at precisely the time the world is emerging from a two-year lockdown with pent-up consumer demand. 

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Free-Market Think Tank Backs Bill Lightening Occupational Licensure Burden, Urges Further Reform

In the view of an Ohio conservative think tank, the Buckeye State should enact a bill the House passed, and the Senate is now considering to pare back licensure burdens for many professionals. 

Greg R. Lawson, a research fellow at the Columbus-based Buckeye Institute, testified this week before the Ohio Senate Workforce and Higher Education Committee in favor of the bill. He added he believes the state should pursue further reform even after the legislation passes the Senate and receives Governor Mike DeWine’s signature. 

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State House Speaker-Elect Ben Toma Fills Committee Chairs for Upcoming Arizona Legislative Session

State Rep. Ben Toma (R-Peoria), elected to serve as the next Speaker of the House, has unveiled his list of committees and chair appointments.

“House Speaker-elect Ben Toma today announced committees and chair appointments for the upcoming 56th Legislature, 1st Regular Session, which opens on January 9, 2023,” according to a press release from the Arizona House Republicans.

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Ohio Senate Passes Major Criminal Justice Reforms

The Ohio Senate voted 27-2 on Wednesday in favor of a criminal justice reform bill that aims to change how quickly inmates can earn time off of their prison sentences, expand immunity from prosecution for minor drug possession offenses, and strengthens penalties for domestic violence offenders.

Senate Bill (SB) 288 sponsored by Senator Nathan Manning (R-North Ridgeville) aims to provide alternative services to people in lieu of jail or prison or to divert people from an already overburdened prison system.

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University in Ohio Retracts Plan That Could Have Punished Students and Staff for Using People’s Legal Names

The University of Toledo walked back a potential policy which would have required faculty and students use an individual’s “chosen name” after the First-Amendment watchdog group Foundation for Individual Rights and Expression (FIRE) accused it of violating free speech rights.

The proposed policy, introduced in February, attempted to mandate the use of a name an individual “choose[s] to be called in day-to-day life” in all verbal communication and on all documents where a legal name is not required such as on course rosters, university identification and directories. FIRE, however, accused the policy of being in violation of the First Amendment for policing speech.

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Legal Foundations Prepare to Defend a Tucson Mother’s Right to Due Process from Bureaucrats

The Goldwater Institute (GI) and Pacific Legal Foundation (PLF) filed their opening brief Wednesday in the case involving Tucson Mother Sarra L., who allegedly had her right to due process violated by the Arizona Department of Child Services (DCS).

“It’s shocking that Arizona bureaucrats are empowered to put a mother’s name on the state’s ‘do not hire’ list [Arizona Central Registry]—labeling her a child abuser, for as long as 25 years—without going through an actual court process, and under rules that courts in several other states have already declared unconstitutional,” said GI Vice President for Legal Affairs Timothy Sandefur in a statement shared with the Arizona Sun Times.

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Pennsylvania Public Schools Adding Racial, Cultural Bias Rules for Teachers

Culture, bias, diversity, inclusion and prejudices are buzzwords punctuating new guidelines being put in place to certify educators in Pennsylvania.

The changes to and implementation of the new certification process has been nearly five years in the making, inclusive of legislative committee endorsements and public comment.

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Speaker Renner: Florida Could Consider Increasing Unemployment Benefits, but Shouldn’t Be by Too Much

When Florida lawmakers return to Tallahassee in March to begin their 2023 legislative session, one topic that could be up for consideration is the state’s unemployment benefits.

Florida’s current maximum unemployment benefit is $275 per week, the second-lowest in the U.S. Florida has kept it at this mark for 23 years.

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Coyotes $2.1 Billion Stadium District Voter Referendum Includes Public Tax Abatements, Infrastructure Costs

 Tempe’s City Council unanimously voted to bring a new $2.1 billion Arizona Coyotes arena and entertainment district to a May 16 voter referendum.

While $1.9 billion of the project is said to be privately funded by the Coyotes’ ownership group, the city has agreed to pay as much as $229 million for infrastructure at the site along with agreeing to a 30-year abatement of property taxes on the arena, music venue and Coyotes practice facility along with an eight-year abatement for the district’s hotels, residential units, retail and office spaces.

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Appeals Court Shuts Down Special Master Review of Mar-a-Lago Documents

A federal appeals court on Thursday ruled that a Trump-appointed judge erred in appointing a special master to independently review the documents the FBI seized from his Mar-a-Lago estate in August.

An 11th Circuit Court of Appeals panel unanimously determined that U.S. District Court Judge Aileen Cannon was incorrect both to appoint a special master to independently assess Trump’s executive privilege claims and to bar the Department of Justice from conducting its own review, Politico reported.

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Half of Americans Believe Wokeism Is Undermining the Military

Half of Americans believe “so-called ‘woke’ policies” cause the military to be less effective, according to a poll published Thursday by the conservative Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation and Institute.

The National Defense Survey, which was conducted in November, found that overall, perceived politicization among the military’s top brass continues to drive historically low levels of trust in the institution among Americans. Half of respondents, mostly Republicans, identified “woke” policies, such as a focus on race and gender diversity in the U.S. service branches and training academies, as one of the greatest threats to the military’s overall effectiveness and the greatest contributor to decreased trust.

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Commentary: A GOP Majority Will Pushback on Corporate America

The results of the 2022 midterms will be dissected endlessly. But among the political ramifications is a very important question for American business executives: With Big Business increasingly involved in political debates (and usually taking sides against Republicans), how will the relationship between the two change under a new GOP House majority?

One answer is that companies should be ready for a wake-up call. This Republican majority will be more populist and less deferential to massive corporations than any that has come to power in the past. Never has the disconnect between executives, employees, and customers been so apparent.

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