Governor Bill Lee Announces Tennessee Will Not Mandate the COVID-19 Vaccine for Schools

Governor Bill Lee announced Thursday that Tennessee would not require COVID-19 vaccines for children to go to school in response to the recommendation made by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC).

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Commentary: GOP House Majority May Put the Brakes on Ukraine Escalation

It’s a distinct possibility, though there are too many variables to predict it, that if the Republicans take the House there will be some sort of conclusion to the war in Ukraine.

This column has called for just that. Not in a shameful betrayal of the freedom-loving people who’ve fought by our side, like, for example, what the Democrats did to the South Vietnamese after an honorable peace was reached in Paris, but rather in a way that preserves our interests and keeps Joe Biden’s much-ballyhooed nuclear Armageddon away.

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Data Expert Predicts ‘Homeschool Boom’ After CDC Committee Votes to Add COVID Shot to Children’s Routine Immunizations

Data journalist and pollster Rich Baris posted to social media he predicts a “homeschool boom” following the news that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) vaccine advisory committee unanimously voted to add the COVID shot to the children and adolescent immunization schedule, a move that will likely lead many states to require COVID shots for school attendance.

Baris, also known as “The People’s Pundit,” tweeted Wednesday, “Parents will flip the F–k out, with good reason. Homeschool boom.”

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Unemployment Remains Low in Tennessee

Unemployment remained near record lows in Tennessee during September, according to new data released this week.

“The state’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate for September came in at 3.4% and is just 0.2 of a percentage point away from Tennessee’s all-time low rate of 3.2%,” according to a press release from the Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development (TDLWD).

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Poll: Virginia 2nd Congressional Candidates Tied at 45 Percent

Representative Elaine Luria (D-VA-02) and state Senator Jen Kiggans (R-Virginia Beach) are tied at 45 percent in among likely voters in the race for Virginia’s second congressional district, according to a new poll from Christopher Newport University’s Wason Center that found that the district’s Democratic voters are most concerned about abortion and Republican voters are most concerned about inflation.

“Virginia’s second Congressional District has been known to switch back and forth between the major parties and it appears the seat is still highly competitive, despite new district lines that bring in more Republican voters,” said Dr. Rebecca Bromley-Trujillo, Research Director of the Wason Center. “If this were a typical midterm election year, this district would likely favor the Republican candidate, especially given an unpopular sitting Democratic President and high inflation. Abortion and concern over threats to democracy appear to have energized Democrats and bolstered support for incumbent Rep. Elaine Luria.”

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Jensen Takes Lead in Minnesota Governor’s Race

A new Alpha News/Trafalgar Group poll has Republican Dr. Scott Jensen narrowly leading Gov. Tim Walz less than three weeks before the midterm election.

Nearly 55% of likely Minnesota voters disapprove of President Joe Biden, an almost identical result to the findings of a Sept. 14 poll.

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Republicans Win Major Election Integrity Ruling Against Michigan Secretary of State

The Republican Party has won an election integrity lawsuit against Michigan Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson over restrictions she imposed on poll challengers.

Benson, per the Republican National Committee, had imposed restrictions on poll challengers, including a new credential form, an “artificial deadline” for appointing them, and limiting the poll workers with whom the challengers may communicate.

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Wisconsin’s Former Parole Commission Boss to Become Racine’s Violence Prevention Manager

The man pushed out as the head of Wisconsin’s Parole Commission after critics said he let dangerous people out of prison is set to become the new violence prevention manager in Racine.

Racine Mayor Cory Mason announced Wednesday that John Tate II will take over the role.

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Attorney General Mark Brnovich Pushes Back Against CDC’s COVID-19 Vaccine Recommendation

Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich (R) pushed back against the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) for voting to put the COVID-19 vaccine on the recommended immunization schedule for children and the Vaccines for Children (VFC) program.

“Every month, it seems that we hear more revealing details about COVID-19 and strong critiques about our government’s initial beliefs and response,” said Brnovich in a press release. “For such relatively new and controversial vaccines to be added to the list of childhood immunizations at this point defies common sense and the rights of parents to decide what’s best for their families.”

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Ohio Lawmakers Introduce Act to Fund Healthcare Services for Child Sexual Assault Survivors

Proposed legislation in the Ohio House would allow child victims of sexual assault to receive money from the state’s Crime Victim Compensation Fund for health care treatment.

The Protect Child Victims Act would allow the attorney general to make emergency awards for out-of-state healthcare expenses, including abortions, for child sexual assault survivors.

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Kari Lake to Host Rally Concert Event Featuring Country Music Star John Rich

Arizona’s Republican gubernatorial nominee Kari Lake’s next big event, Kari’s Country Concert, will take place Saturday at 5:00 pm and feature a rodeo, rally, and concert starring county music star John Rich.

“Join us in Morristown for a Rodeo, Rally & concert with [John Rich]! This event will be so much fun! I can’t wait to see you all there,” Lake tweeted.

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Poll: Oz Draws Even with Fetterman Just Weeks Before Midterms

Democratic Lt. Gov. John Fetterman and Republican Dr. Mehmet Oz are statistically tied in a new survey of Pennsylvania voters, five days before they hold their first and only debate of the Pennsylvania Senate race and less than three weeks before voting begins, per a survey released on Thursday.

Fetterman and Oz gained 46.3% and 45.5%, respectively, of the support of respondents, according to a poll conducted by Insider  for FOX29, Philadelphia’s Fox affiliate. Around 5% of voters remained undecided, according to the poll.

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Youngkin Restores Civil Rights for 800 Virginians in Time for the Election

Governor Glenn Youngkin has restored the rights of 800 more Virginians, approving the restorations last week, in time to vote in the upcoming election.

“Second chances are essential to ensuring Virginians who have made mistakes are able to move forward toward a successful future. I am proud of the efforts made by these formerly incarcerated Virginians to regain their civil rights,” Governor Glenn Youngkin said in the Friday announcement. “I applaud those who have committed to starting fresh with renewed values and a will to positively contribute to our society.”

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Poll: Most High School Students Say They Were Taught Critical Race Theory

Most high school students reported being taught Critical Race Theory (CRT), according to a City Journal poll released Thursday.

Of the students surveyed between the ages 18 and 20 years old, 90% said they had either been taught or heard about CRT in school, according to the City Journal poll. Approximately 69% said they had at least heard in school that “white people have white privilege” and 57% were taught that “white people have unconscious biases that negatively affect non-white people.”

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Report: Colleges Struggle with Admission Process After Eliminating Standardized Testing Scores

Eliminating the use of standardized college admission tests to judge college applicants in order to increase diversity on campus is not working, according to an October report.

Colleges that eliminated mandatory testing for applications, going “test-optional,” are struggling to fairly assess students because they lack standards to judge the applicants, according to a report by Vanderbilt University Assistant Professor Kelly Slay. While test-optional admissions have increased applicants, a lack of academic standards has created a “chaotic” and “stressful” process leading to bias that was intended to be ignored.

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DEA: 36 Million Lethal Doses of Fentanyl Removed from U.S. Communities Between May and September

As a result of law enforcement operations from May through September of this year, U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration agents and law enforcement partners confiscated 36 million lethal doses of fentanyl, enough to kill 36 million Americans.

As part of the DEA’s One Pill Can Kill initiative, DEA agents and law enforcement partners in multiple states seized more than 10.2 million fentanyl pills and approximately 980 pounds of fentanyl powder.

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Biden DOJ Begs Congress for Another $34 Million to Target January 6 Defendants

Department of Justice building, street view

The DOJ pleaded for that funding in its 2023 budget request, saying U.S. Attorneys’ offices would have to cut budgets to pay for Jan. 6 prosecutions otherwise, the outlet reported. The department’s investigation has already resulted in more than 870 arrests, with hundreds of identified Jan. 6 riot participants avoiding arrest so far.

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Commentary: The Commie Train’s A’Comin’

Several large American cities have contracted with a Chinese state-owned rail car manufacturer to design and manufacture subway cars for their subway systems, raising serious cybersecurity and human-rights concerns. Over the past eight years, China Railway Rolling Stock Corporation (CRRC) has secured more than $2.6 billion in federal transit contracts to provide passenger railcars in Los Angeles, Boston, Chicago, and Philadelphia.

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Big Business Urges Lawmakers to Prevent Certain Illegal Migrants from Deportation

The Coalition For The American Dream, a group composed of 80 businesses, called for lawmakers to pass legislation to prevent deportation of recipients of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program after it was declared illegal.

The letter’s signatories, which include Amazon, Apple, General Motors, Microsoft, Target and Verizon as well as trade associations like the Chamber of Commerce, asked lawmakers to pass permanent, bipartisan legislative solutions to prevent the migrants from being deported, claiming the migrants provided economic value to the U.S. DACA, implemented by the Obama administration in 2012, allows immigrants who entered the country illegally and have been in the U.S. since they were children to stay in the country and gain work authorization, a process that is renewed every two years; however, the program was declared illegal by the 5th Circuit Court on Oct. 5.

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Afghan Migrants Say UN Workers Gave Them Directions to U.S. Border

Guatemala City, Guatemala — The United Nations and other aid groups are informing migrants from across the globe how to get to the United States to cross the border illegally, six migrants from Afghanistan told the Daily Caller News Foundation after they were apprehended in Guatemala.

The migrants said that before they arrived in Guatemala that aid workers provided them with maps guiding them to Mexico so that they can reach the U.S. southern border. The men were six of 16 Afghans in the detention facility for foreign migrants in Guatemala City.

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