Commentary: The Civil Disobedience of Raising a Family

In case you haven’t noticed, times have changed, and somehow, those who hold to traditional societal norms have become the new face of counter culturalism. As this is unfamiliar territory to those on the traditional end of the spectrum, a few lessons are needed in how to live up to this new moniker. One of those lessons is how to engage in civil disobedience.

If you’re like me, the phrase “civil disobedience” conjures up images of bra-burning hippies protesting Vietnam and demanding that society “make love, not war.” But in a world where up has become down and good has become evil, civil disobedience no longer means we must take to the streets and chain ourselves to some inanimate object. In reality, the best civil disobedience we, as members of the new countercultural movement, can perform is right in our own homes, raising our families.

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Airline Shows Off ‘Inclusive’ Uniform Policy with Trans, Cross-Dressing Flight Attendants

Virgin Atlantic Airways launched an ad campaign Wednesday highlighting the company’s new uniform policy allowing men to wear skirts, along with several other new transgender-related policies.

The company’s new ads feature men in women’s uniforms and several people who appear to be transgender dancing, walking on a red carpet and giving interviews about the company’s LGBT-inclusivity. The airline also introduced optional pronoun pins employees can wear on their uniforms, mandatory “inclusivity training” for employees and a ticketing system update allowing people with “gender-neutral” passports to use their gender codes and titles, according to a press release.

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Maricopa County Announces ‘Election Command Center’ to Combat Misinformation

Maricopa County, Arizona, has formed what it refers to as an “election command center” in hopes of combatting election misinformation, adding officials will vet journalists who they deem qualified to participate in the events.

A group of six elected officials plus elections and communications professionals have worked together to establish the “2022 Elections Command Center”, according to a press release from the county’s office.

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Three More Counties Want Texas to Declare Invasion at Southern Border; Total at 32

Three more counties are the latest to express support for Texas declaring an invasion at the southern border, bringing the total to 32.

The judge and county commissioners of Ector County, in the Permian Basin, signed a Declaration of Local State of Disaster on Sept. 27 stating the “health, safety, and welfare of Ector County residents are under an imminent threat of disaster from the unprecedented levels of illegal immigration, human trafficking, and drug smuggling coming across the U.S. border from Mexico.”

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Man Who Ran Over and Killed Conservative Teen Charged with Murder

A North Dakota man arrested for running over a teenager he purportedly believed to be a Republican extremist was charged with murder Friday.

Shannon Brandt admitted to hitting Cayler Ellingson with his vehicle Sept. 18 and left the scene before returning, calling 911 and leaving again, according to a police affidavit. Brandt was subsequently charged with felony criminal vehicular homicide involving a motor vehicle and duty in accident involving death, but Foster County State’s Attorney Kara Brinster replaced the first charge with the more severe felony charge of murder.

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Music Spotlight: Noah Hicks

NASHVILLE, Tennessee- If there is one thing that means something to me in country music, it is authenticity. Are you singing your truths or just latching onto the newest country fad?

Noah Hicks is probably the most authentic country guy I have ever interviewed. He is a fifth-generation farmer from Carrolton, Georgia. The land he tilled with an air-conditioned tractor is the land his grandfathers plowed with a mule.

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Commentary: Neither White House nor Common Man Can Evade Recession Data

Newly released data from the Commerce Department show what some people have been saying for months: The nation is in recession.

Furthermore, the Biden administration’s cherry-picking of data has come back to bite it, with even its selected data points now being revised to indicate a recession. And while these numbers confirm the economy shrank in the first half of the year, the rest of this year holds little promise of recovery.

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House GOP: FBI Retaliating Against Whistleblowers and Conservative Agents

On Thursday, three Republican members of the U.S. House of Representatives claimed that the FBI has been actively retaliating against agents who are suspected of being whistleblowers, as well as those who hold conservative beliefs.

As The Daily Caller reports, a letter was sent to Jennifer Moore, Executive Assistant Director of the FBI’s Human Resource Branch, detailing these allegations. The letter was signed by three members of the House Judiciary Committee: Congressmen Jim Jordan (R-Ohio), Darrell Issa (R-Calif.), and Mike Johnson (R-La.).

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Tennessee Closing In on $6 Billion in Sports Wagers Since Online Wagering Opened in November 2020

If trends hold, by the end of next month Tennessee will have seen $6 billion in sports wagers since the state opened legal online sports gambling in November 2020.

Then, the state had four sportsbook operators in Action 24/7, BetMGM, FanDuel and DraftKings.

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Virginia Department of Education Selects English-As-Second Language Educator for Teacher of the Year

Spotsylvania middle school English-as-second language [ESL] teacher Fabiana Parker is the 2023 Virginia Teacher of the Year, making her Virginia’s nominee for National Teacher of the Year.

“Teachers play a critical role in the success of every learner and child in Virginia and Fabiana is the best of the best,” Governor Glenn Youngkin said in a Virginia Department of Education press release. “Growing up as an ESL student, Fabiana knows firsthand the challenges her students face. She began her career as an educator as a girl teaching her grandmother to read. She has helped hundreds of students find a path to success by equipping them with the English skills necessary to prosper academically and in life.”

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Minnesota Police Group Does 180 After Endorsing Tyler Kistner in 2020

After endorsing former Marine Tyler Kistner in 2020, the Minnesota Police and Peace Officers Association (MPPOA) did a 180 this year and announced it is endorsing Kistner’s opponent for reelection.

Democrat U.S. Rep. Angie Craig narrowly beat Kistner by 2 percentage points in 2020, and the two are in a rematch this year.

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84-Year-Old Michigan Woman Shot While Canvassing on Abortion Speaks Out

Eighty-four-year-old Joan Jacobson never imagined she would be shot when she knocked on the door of a Michigan couple’s home, hoping to convince them not to vote for a local pro-abortion ballot proposal.

Sharon Harvey answered the door and quickly became “hostile, belligerent, and antagonistic” when she learned Jacobson’s mission, according to David Kallman, Jacobson’s attorney with the Great Lakes Justice Center.

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Georgia Judge Strikes Down Part of Rivian Electric Truck Plant Deal

A Morgan County judge has struck down a key component of a deal to entice an electric vehicle manufacturer to build a plant in Georgia.

Earlier this year, the Georgia Department of Economic Development and the Joint Development Authority of Jasper, Morgan, Newton and Walton counties announced a deal to give incentives totaling $1.5 billion to electric vehicle manufacturer Rivian Automotive. The company plans to build a $5 billion plant at Stanton Springs North along Interstate 20 in Morgan and Newton counties.

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Pennsylvania Senate Race Tightens; Economy and Crime Focal Points

Though polls in the race for Pennsylvania’s U.S. Senate seat have shown Democrat John Fetterman with a comfortable lead, it may be narrowing.

As the Nov. 8 election draws closer, Republican Dr. Mehmet Oz trails Fetterman 45% to 43%, according to a new poll of very likely voters released today by Emerson College and The Hill.

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Wisconsin Sen. Johnson Says Democrats Can’t Defend Their Record

Republican Sen. Ron Johnson attributed his lead in the polls to the Democrats’ inability to defend their policies based on the record of their past two years in power.

“The Democrats can’t defend their their record,” Johnson said on the Friday edition of the “Just the News, Not Noise” television show. “I mean, their policies have had just such disastrous results with the open border, the flooded deadly drugs, 40 year high inflation and record gasoline prices, which they purposely drove higher.”

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Policy Group Says Intel’s Ohio Tax Breaks Could Be Better Spent

An Ohio nonprofit policy research group criticized state approval of up to $650 million in tax breaks for Intel’s $20 billion project in central Ohio, saying the money could be used for schools or seniors rather than large corporations.

Policy Matters Ohio, a Cleveland-based research group, called the Ohio Tax Credit Authority’s approval earlier this week of the incentives a missed opportunity and challenged the state’s openness and accountability.

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Florida Attorney General Warns Potential Looters of Consequences During State of Emergency

Florida Attorney General Ashley Moody is warning people not to loot during the state of emergency resulting from widespread destruction caused by Hurricane Ian.

She issued a warning to criminals on Friday, saying, “you will spend maximum time allowed by law behind bars.”

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No Chance of Winning’: Four Female Athletes Challenge Connecticut High School Transgender Policy

Four female athletes are locked in a legal battle over transgender athletes that could set major precedent for the same fight playing out in schools around the country.

The four female athletes appealed to a federal court over a Connecticut policy allowing high school males identifying as females to compete against girls. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit heard Soule v. Connecticut Association of Schools this week, where the girls’ legal team argued the policy is unfair to girls and hands female sports victories over to transgender athletes.

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Autopsy Reveals Eliza Fletcher Died from Gunshot Wound to the Head

An autopsy has revealed the cause of death of a Memphis woman, who was abducted in September while jogging. 

“Eliza Fletcher, 34, had a gunshot wound to the back of her head, blunt-force injuries to a leg and jaw fractures, according to an autopsy completed by the West Tennessee Regional Forensic Center in Memphis,” according to Fox News. 

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Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey Announces Lowest Tax Rate in the Nation Going into Effect Next Year

Gov. Doug Ducey (R) announced Thursday that Arizona’s surging economy had paved the way for a historic flat income tax rate to come a year in advance.

“It’s no secret Arizona’s economy is booming. Over the last eight years, we’ve made responsible decisions to live within our means, reduce burdensome government regulations, lower taxes every year and ensure our state remains a great place to live,” Ducey said in a letter to the Arizona Department of Revenue (ADR). “It’s time to deliver lasting tax relief to Arizona families and small businesses so they can keep more of their hard-earned money.”

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Michigan Legislature OKs $1 Billion Spending, Mostly Economic Development

The Michigan Legislature approved a $1 billion spending plan primarily meant to attract critical state projects. The supplemental spending bill was passed Wednesday over objections from some Republican lawmakers that the spending package wouldn’t benefit taxpayers in the long run.

The state is spending a $7 billion taxpayer surplus.

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Suicide Rate in U.S. Spiked in 2021 After Two Years of Decline

After two years of steady decline, the rate of suicide deaths in the United States rose sharply in 2021, reversing the progress made in 2020 and 2019.

According to CNN, 47,646 Americans take their own lives over the course of the year 2021, according to data released by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC), which amounts to roughly one death every 11 minutes.

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Major Government Unions Lose over 200K Members

The top four public labor unions in the U.S. lost hundreds of thousands of members since a 2018 Supreme Court case that ruled government employees could not be forced to pay a union to keep their job, a new report shows that.

The Commonwealth Foundation released the report, which found that the top four public labor unions – AFT, AFSCME, NEA, and SEIU – lost nearly 219,000 members altogether since the Janus v. AFSCME ruling.

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Minneapolis Ranks as Best City Nationally for People with Disabilities

While Minneapolis tops WalletHub’s ranking for best cities for people with disabilities, St. Paul comes in 14th.

WalletHub released its “2022’s Best & Worst Cities for People with Disabilities” report on Tuesday. In the report, WalletHub assessed physical and economic challenges of managing a disability by analyzing 34 indicators of disability-friendliness in 182 cities that related to three equally weighted categories: economy, “quality of life” and health care. WalletHub selected the 150 most populated U.S. cities and at least two of the most populated cities in each state.

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Commentary: Setting Expectations for the House in 2022 Midterms

As the generic ballot closed over the course of the summer, the battle for the House of Representatives has moved into the forefront of political analysis. House races tend to develop late, and it is too soon to predict with specificity what the outcome is going to be. But we can probably set some reasonable bounds for expectations at this point.

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Trump Scores Another Win in Mar-a-Lago Case

Former President Donald Trump on Thursday scored a major win in the ongoing court battle pertaining to the FBI’s seizure of documents from his Mar-a-Lago estate in early August.

“There shall be no separate requirement on Plaintiff at this stage, prior to the review of any of the Seized Materials, to lodge ex ante final objections to the accuracy of Defendant’s Inventory, its descriptions, or its contents,” wrote U.S. District Judge Aileen Cannon in the Thursday ruling.

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