Tennessee State Senate Majority Leader Jack Johnson Talks About Life on the Campaign Trail

Thursday morning on The Tennessee Star Report, host Leahy welcomed Tennessee Senate Majority Leader, Jack Johnson in studio to discuss the last few weeks on the campaign trail for re-election.

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Clint Brewer Predicts Republican Victory as Majority of Americans Vote on Country’s Wrong Turn

Thursday morning on The Tennessee Star Report, host Leahy welcomed recovering journalist, Clint Brewer in studio to predict that Republican candidates will have somewhere between a heavy trickle and a wave in the upcoming midterm elections for both the House and the Senate.

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Across the State, Senator Jack Johnson Sees Signs of a Red Tsunami in Tennessee Midterms

Thursday morning on The Tennessee Star Report, host Leahy welcomed Tennessee Senate Majority Leader, Jack Johnson in studio talks about campaigning for other republican Tennessee House and Senate candidates and the sentiment of blue state refugees.

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State Senator Jack Johnson Describes the Job of Majority Leader in Tennessee Senate and Upcoming Agenda

Thursday morning on The Tennessee Star Report, host Leahy welcomed State Senator Jack Johnson in studio to describe the senate majority duties, relationships and upcoming agenda in the Tennessee state senate.

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Recovering Journalist Clint Brewer on Biden Speech: If There Are Credible Threats of Political Violence, Address Them Publicly

Thursday morning on The Tennessee Star Report, host Leahy welcomed recovering journalist, Clint Brewer in studio to comment upon President Biden’s recent speech alluding to political violence after the midterm elections November 8th.

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Chattanooga Post Office Closed, Reopened After Employee-Related Shooting

Chattanooga’a main post office was closed down for a day earlier this week after an argument between employees turned violent. 

“Effective immediately, all operations at the Chattanooga, TN, Main Post Office, Chattanooga Finance Station and Chattanooga P&DC are temporarily suspended until further notice,” said a United States Postal Service (USPS) press release from Monday. 

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Nashville Home Prices Fall as Mortgage Rates Continue to Rise

The average median list price for single-family homes and townhouses in Nashville for October was $510,000, according to data compiled by Movoto Real Estate – down from the previous month’s average list prices of $549,000 in September and $569,553 in August.

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STAND America PAC Runs over 1,000 Ads Urging Black Voters to Abandon Democrats in the Midterm Elections

A political action committee (PAC) associated with STAND America has purchased over 1,000 ads for U.S. Senate and House races on black radio stations to urge black voters to abandon the Democrat Party.

“Black and Latino voters are turning away from Democrats toward Republicans who share their commitment to faith, family, public safety and educational choice for their children,” Bishop E.W. Jackson, STAND America PAC (SAPAC) chairman, said in a press statement. “They are also feeling the ravages of inflation.” 

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Addiction Recovery Center Expanding Headquarters in Tennessee

A significant number of new jobs are coming to Williamson County after a large addiction recovery center, headquartered in Franklin, announced that it will be expanding its operations in the Volunteer State. 

Just a year after moving from Arizona, Landmark Recovery will invest $7.5 million to expand in Franklin, a move that will bring approximately 1300 new jobs to the area. 

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FBI, U.S. Attorneys Will Monitor Election Day Complaints

Assistant U.S. Attorneys General (AUSAs), along with the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) will be monitoring Tennessee’s election day activities, and handling any complaints that may arise. 

AUSAs Robert Levine and Steve Jordan will “lead the efforts of his Office in connection with the Justice Department’s nationwide Election Day Program for the upcoming November 8, 2022, general election,” according to a press release. 

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Black and Hispanic Catholic School Students Outperformed Those in Government Schools on Nation’s Report Card Assessments

Results of national education assessments released last week showed unprecedented drops in academic achievement in fourth- and eighth-grade math and reading scores, but black, Hispanic, and low-income Catholic school students outperformed their counterparts in national, charter, and public school averages.

Data from the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), also known as the “Nation’s Report Card,” revealed a dramatic decline in test scores from 2019, when students were last tested.

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Ohio Ballot Measures for the Midterm Election

With the midterm election, less than a week away Ohio voters are going to decide on bond measures, tax levies, charter amendments, bail considerations, and who is allowed to vote in local Ohio elections across the state.

With the large ballot at hand here is an overview of the state and city-wide ballot measures in Ohio.

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Ohioans Ready for Election Day as Candidates Make Final Push

With the midterm election less than a week away Ohio voters are going to decide who they want in Congress, the governor’s mansion, and the Ohio Supreme Court and will vote on two major ballot issues.

With the large ballot at hand here is a breakdown of who is running for election and what position they are running for.

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Democratic Candidate for Ohio Senate Seat Says He Advocates for Schools While Supporting School Closures

Ohio Democratic U.S. Senate nominee Representative Tim Ryan (D-OH-13) is highlighting school advocacy as part of his political platform while supporting school closures, forced mask mandates, and remote learning.

“Our kids are entering a competitive and rapidly changing world, and we owe it to them and their parents to make sure they’re ready to take on any challenges the world throws at them,” Ryan said.

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Metro Council Defers Stadium Term Sheet and East Bank Development to Future Meetings

The resolution to approve the term sheet, which gives an overview of the terms and conditions of the agreements and transactions for the financing, construction and operation of a new domed stadium adjacent to the existing Nissan Stadium which will then be demolished, was deferred for two meetings. Both the Budget and Finance Committee and the Public Facilities, Arts and Culture Committees had previously voted to defer for two meetings.

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ASU’s Federalist Society Hosts Voter Fraud Forum Featuring Opposing Perspectives from Left-Wing Lawyer and Fox News Journalist

Two very different perspectives on voter fraud were presented during a forum put on Tuesday by the ASU Federalist Society. Deroy Murdock, a Fox News contributor and contributing editor with National Review Online, argued that there is plenty of evidence of significant voter fraud in the U.S. in recent years. Roy Herrera, an election attorney who has represented the Joe Biden and Mark Kelly political campaigns, asserted that there are minimal problems with voter fraud.

Moderated by Arizona Supreme Court Justice Clint Bolick, most of the forum consisted of each speaker explaining their position, with a few questions at the end. Murdock opened by saying it’s “maddening” that the Democrats claim there is no evidence of voter fraud. He said affidavits from people who have seen voter fraud constitute evidence, and referenced the Heritage Foundation’s database of 1,191 voter fraud convictions. 

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Pennsylvania Supreme Court Decides Against Counting Undated Ballots

Pennsylvania’s Supreme Court this week ordered counties to decline to count any absentee or mail-in ballot delivered in an undated envelope.

State law, which has permitted no-excuse absentee voting since 2020, requires those not voting in person to place their ballot into a secrecy envelope before placing it into a return envelope. Voter must sign and date that outer envelope for their ballot to be valid under state statute. 

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Commentary: With States Hands-Off, Homeschooling Takes Off

South Dakota epitomizes the rapid growth of homeschooling in America. Guided by the principle that parents, not the government, have the right to determine what and how their kids are taught, homeschooling families have overturned existing rules and batted down attempts over the last decade to impose new ones in many states, including South Dakota. 

What’s left in much of the United States today is essentially an honor system in which parents are expected to do a good job without much input or oversight. The rollback of regulations, coupled with the  ill effects of remote learning during the pandemic, have boosted the number of families opting out of public schools in favor of educating their kids at home.  

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Republicans Sue over Green Bay Early Voting Observers

There’s a lawsuit in Green Bay that accuses the city’s election boss of not allowing poll watchers to actually watch people vote.

The Republican National Committee filed the lawsuit Tuesday. It claims that Green Bay Clerk Celestine Jeffreys is partially blocking election observers.

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Joe Biden Misspeaks So Badly During Florida Campaign Events, Even The New York Times Notices

Joe Biden committed multiple verbal gaffes in Florida Tuesday while rallying Democrat voters against “mega-MAGA” Republicans in the comfortably red state, and his slip-ups were so bad, even the New York Times noticed.

While delivering remarks on protecting Social Security and Medicare and lowering prescription drug costs in Hallandale Beach, Florida, Tuesday afternoon, he once again told the lie that his son Beau died in Iraq.

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Minnesota Parents Protest Sexually Explicit LGBT Book at School Board Meeting

Concerned parents whose children attend Hastings Public Schools found a creative way to protest the availability of a sexually explicit book.

At last Wednesday’s school board meeting, parents and grandparents held up signs protesting the district’s approval of Maia Kobabe’s “Gender Queer,” a graphic novel that depicts oral sex and masturbation.

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Rumors Swirl in Georgia After Elderly Congressman Disappears from Public Eye

“Weekend at Bernie’s” rumors are swirling in Georgia as an elderly Democrat congressman runs for reelection without debating his Republican rival, or campaigning.

Rep. David Scott, 77, has made no public appearance in the past month, and some Republicans are now wondering if he’s even alive.

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Labor Shortage Impacting Connecticut’s Economic Recovery

A labor shortage across Connecticut has caused issues as employers are having difficulty finding qualified job applicants, hampering efforts to emerge from the COVID-19 pandemic, one industry expert said.

Chris DePentima, president and CEO of the Connecticut Business and Industry Association, said in a statement the state has 41% more job openings than before the pandemic, but over that same period of time more than 45,000 people have left the workforce.

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Dixon Narrows Polling Gap with Michigan Gov. Whitmer, Notches Significant Statewide Endorsement

Less than a week before Election Day, Michigan Republican gubernatorial candidate Tudor Dixon received two pieces of good news.

First, her poll rankings against Democratic incumbent Gov. Gretchen Whitmer have tilted significantly in Dixon’s favor. Second, she garnered the endorsement of the Michigan Chamber of Commerce.

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RPV Wins Injunction Blocking Appointment of Elections Officers in Prince William

A court granted a temporary injunction blocking appointment of over 30 elections officers in Prince William County after the Republican Party of Virginia alleged problems including that some of the officers were self-designated Republicans — not nominated by the RPV.

Additionally in the October filing, the RPV argued that in other precincts, both the chief and assistant chief officers were from the same party. Finally, the RPV said that the county elections board had sought to appoint non-partisan officers in some precincts even though the RPV could provide nominees.

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School Employee Takes Suit Against Union to Ohio Supreme Court

A nonunion school guidance counselor wants the Ohio Supreme Court to decide if she can hire her own lawyer for a grievance with her school system, rather than be forced to use union representation.

The court has not set a hearing date for Barbara Kolkowski, who sued the Ashtabula Area Teachers Association and asked the court to rule a union – which she is not a member of – cannot force her to accept union legal representation to arbitrate a workplace grievance.

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Situation in Phoenix Homeless Camp Remains in Disarray as Citizens Speak Against City in Court

Attorneys representing a group of Phoenix business owners argued in court against the City of Phoenix (COP) Thursday regarding one of the largest homeless camps in the nation, “the Zone.” The Arizona-based Goldwater Institute (GI) said residential testimony revealed how dire the situation has become.

“Thursday’s hearing was on the city’s effort to throw out this case, brought by neighborhood property owners against the city for maintaining a gigantic homeless encampment, which is destroying neighborhood businesses and properties. The testimony revealed startling examples of the pollution, crime indecency, and violence that goes on in The Zone,” said GI Vice President of Legal Affairs Timothy Sandefur in a statement emailed to the Arizona Sun Times.

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Virginia NAACP Pays $20,000 for FOIA Request of Records from Miyares’ Election Integrity Unit

The Virginia NAACP says it is paying $20,000 for a FOIA request into Attorney General Jason Miyares’ Unit of Election Integrity. On Monday, the organization issued a press release suggesting that the unit is unnecessary and that the high price for the requested information is meant to protect the unit…

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Pennsylvania Natural Gas Impact Fee Collection to Hit Record-High $275 Million

State revenues from natural gas were high last year, and are expected to set a new record this year buoyed by rising prices and more drilling.

According to a new estimate from the Independent Fiscal Office, impact fees from natural gas wells will hit $275 million in 2022, $40 million higher than 2021.

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Site Selection Magazine: Virginia Top State for Business Climate

Site Selection Magazine says Virginia is the top state in its business climate ranking, beating out Georgia, Texas, North Carolina, and Arizona for the top spot. Although the commonwealth only ranked 11th in a survey of executives, one of the indicators in the index, it performed well in the other…

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Judge Orders Restrictions on Arizona Ballot Watchers

A judge granted a temporary restraining order on Tuesday against an election watchdog group, setting back efforts to enforce election integrity in a crucial swing state.

According to Politico, U.S. District Court Judge Michael Liburdi has forbidden the group Clean Elections USA from getting too close to ballot drop-boxes. Liburdi had previously refused to implement restrictions on ballot-watchers, but allowed the group Arizona Alliance for Retired Americans to make another case as to why such poll-watchers should have certain limitations placed on them.

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Biden Admin Will Spend over $13 Billion to Bring Down Soaring Energy Bills

The White House announced Wednesday that the Biden administration will spend $13.5 billion total to directly cover rapidly increasing household utility bills and help homes become more energy efficient ahead of the winter months.

The Department of Health and Human Services will give $4.5 billion to local governments to help low-income people pay their electricity bills which will increase further during the winter months due to natural gas shortages, according to a White House fact sheet. The Energy Department will also spend $9 billion on tax credits for households that buy heat pumps and insulate their homes to make them more “energy efficient.”

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Report: Biden Admin Weighs Potential Investigation into Musk’s Purchase of Twitter

The Treasury Department is weighing whether or not it has the authority to launch an investigation into Elon Musk’s recent acquisition of Twitter, The Washington Post reported Tuesday evening.

Under the terms of the deal, foreign investors, including a member of the Saudi royal family, could potentially have access to confidential financial and user data, according to The Washington Post, citing anonymous sources familiar with the deal. Treasury Department officials are examining their legal options to investigate the deal, but whether they were aware of this potential information sharing was unclear and the Department’s Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS) typically investigates foreign nationals, not U.S. citizens like Musk.

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Report: Biden Admin Program Granting Venezuelan Migrants U.S. Entry Quickly Filling Up

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The Biden administration is on pace to quickly meet its cap for a program to grant Venezuelan migrants legal entry just a few weeks after implementation, according to Reuters.

The U.S. has granted entry to around 7,000 migrants, Reuters reported, citing a source familiar with the matter. The program, which began in early October, will allow a total of 24,000 Venezuelan migrants to enter legally.

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Commentary: Twitter Will Survive Longer than the Washed-Up Celebrities Who Are Quitting It

I have never considered that my patronage of a business, or the lack thereof, would make or break the enterprise. So, I find it amusing that D-list celebrities believe their threats to leave Twitter could make any difference when it comes to the company’s bottom line.

This week, stars who haven’t been relevant in years, such as Toni Braxton and Sara Bareilles, announced that they would leave Twitter in the wake of its purchase by SpaceX founder Elon Musk. Braxton, who last had a Billboard 100 hit in the 1990s, said she was leaving because she saw “hate speech” on the platform since the acquisition late last week. Bareilles, who I think had a hit with “Love Song” in the early 2000s, claims the platform is “just not for me” anymore. 

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Salvation Army Drops Racial Content from Website amid Public Pressure

The Salvation Army has dropped contentious racial material from its website following inquiry from a conservative activist group.

Last year, reports emerged that the religious organization had asked its white members to seek forgiveness for racism. Following public controversy the group backed off of that stance and claimed to have removed racial materials from its training manuals.

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Biden Denounces ‘Extreme MAGA Republicans,’ Trump ‘Abuse of Power’ in Fiery Speech

In a bellicose speech on Wednesday, President Joe Biden warned Americans that “democracy is on the ballot” ahead of the November midterm elections, attempting to present the electoral contest as a choice between a Trump-led autocracy and a Democratic-led republic.

Biden filled the speech with vitriolic rhetoric against “extreme MAGA Republicans” and derided the “election deniers” who questioned the legitimacy of the 2020 presidential election.

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Elon Musk Announces $8.00 Monthly Fee for Verified Users

Twitter’s sole director Elon Musk announced on Tuesday that he will be charging verified accounts $8.00 a month to retain their blue checkmark status.

“Twitter’s current lords & peasants system for who has or doesn’t have a blue checkmark is bullshit,” he tweeted Tuesday afternoon. “Power to the people! Blue for $8/month.”

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