Commentary: Losing Confidence in the Pillars of Our Civilization

Millions of citizens long ago concluded that professional sports, academia, and entertainment were no longer disinterested institutions, but far Left and deliberately hostile to Middle America. 

Yet American conservatives still adamantly supported the nation’s traditional investigatory, intelligence, and military agencies—especially when they came under budgetary or cultural attacks. 

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Nashville Metro Council Will Hold Two Day Public Discussion on Homelessness in the City

Nashville’s Metro will hold a two-day public discussion to tackle the homelessness problem in Nashville. Beginning next Wednesday, anyone who wants to discuss their ideas on how the city can tackle homelessness in Nashville is invited to attend and speak.

The event will be held at the Downtown Public Library at 615 Church Street, in the first-floor conference room. The meeting will be from 5 PM to 8 PM. The second meeting will be held on December 1st, at the same time and location. There will be an overflow room if needed.

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U.S. Home Sales Continued to Grow in October as Housing Market Remains Hot

A beige house in a suburban community during the day

Home sales in the U.S. grew in October as buyers continue to enter a hot market, according to the National Association of Realtors.

Existing home sales increased at the fastest pace since January, growing 0.8% in October from the previous month to a seasonally adjusted rate of 6.34 million, the National Association of Realtors (NAR) reported Monday. October home sales declined 5.8% compared to the figure in October 2020, with the inventory of unsold homes decreasing 12% to 1.25 million on a year-over-year basis.

“Home sales remain resilient, despite low inventory and increasing affordability challenges,” Lawrence Yun, NAR’s chief economist, said in the report. “Inflationary pressures, such as fast-rising rents and increasing consumer prices, may have some prospective buyers seeking the protection of a fixed, consistent mortgage payment.”

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Indianapolis Equity Administrator Lectures Middle Schoolers About ‘Environmental Racism,’ ‘Racism Against Unborn Black Babies’

A top equity administrator at the biggest school district in Indiana spent nearly an hour lecturing students about systemic racism and encouraged them to become activists, according to video taken of the lecture obtained by the Daily Caller News Foundation.

Indianapolis Public Schools (IPS) has conducted numerous equity and racial justice initiatives, including student lectures and lessons, according to documents reviewed by the DCNF. In one Jan. 15 video, Dr. Patricia Payne, the director of the IPS Racial Equity Office explained to students that their black peers are sometimes considered “less than” and encouraged students to “stop all this madness,” as part of a “Racial Justice Speaker Series.”

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Biden Will Run for Reelection, Critics Point to Economic Concerns

White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki confirmed that President Joe Biden will run for reelection in 2024, but critics have been quick to point out economic difficulties during his presidency.

Psaki addressed reporters’ questions about previous reporting that Biden would run for the White House again in 2024, saying, “That’s his intention.” Biden would be 82 years old at the start of his second term.

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Anti-Fossil Fuel Activists Support Biden’s Move to Release Oil from Reserves

Environmentalists voiced support for President Joe Biden’s decision to tap into the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) despite their firm opposition to fossil fuels.

“The Biden admin is taking effective action to protect Americans from oil price gouging. This is what reserves are for — defending our economy against disruption,” Democratic Sen. Ed Markey, a climate hawk and Green New Deal proponent, tweeted Tuesday. “Profiteering can’t go unanswered, especially as Big Oil makes billions and fuels the climate crisis through exports.”

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New Records Cast Doubt on Hunter Biden’s Claim He Finally Divested from Chinese Private Equity Firm

Hunter Biden no longer holds any interest in his personal LLC or the Chinese private equity firm BHR Partners, his attorney told The New York Times on Saturday, but new records obtained by the Daily Caller News Foundation cast doubt on the claim.

Hunter Biden, through his company, Skaneateles LLC, obtained a 10% stake in BHR with a $420,000 investment in October 2017. White House press secretary Jen Psaki said as early as February that Hunter Biden was in the process of divesting his ownership stake in the firm, but Chinese business records continue to state as of Wednesday afternoon that Skaneateles remains a 10% owner of BHR.

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‘Everything’s About Race’ in the American Justice System, Warns Dershowitz

Alan Dershowitz, the famed law scholar and appellate lawyer, has a stark warning for judges, prosecutors and defense lawyers: America’s justice system is being corrupted by identity politics and critical race theory.

In an interview with Just the News, Dershowitz deplored the growing trend in recent criminal cases toward political agendas supplanting the neutral consideration of evidence and law that has been the lifeblood of U.S. jurisprudence for more than two centuries.

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Rep. Boebert Introduces Legislation to Ban Federal Settlement Payments to Illegal Migrants

Rep. Lauren Boebert, the fiery House GOP freshman from Colorado, is introducing legislation to prohibit the federal government from making settlement payments to illegal immigrants who have sued because their families were separated at the border.

“In Biden’s America, it is better to be a criminal than a law enforcement officer,” Boebert said this week when she rolled out her new bill. “Over half of Border Patrol agents may be fired because of Biden’s vaccine mandate for federal employees, but illegal aliens get a free pass into our country and could receive a $450,000 check. For contrast, the highest-paid Border Patrol agents make less than half that in yearly salary after 20 years of service.”

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Commentary: The Countries with the Cleanest Environments in the World Are Also the Most Economically Free, Research Shows

One of the most frequently raised arguments against capitalism is that it is the primary driver of environmental pollution and climate change. But if we compare Yale University’s ranking of countries with the highest environmental performance with the Heritage Foundation’s Index of Economic Freedom, a very different correlation emerges.

For more than 20 years, Yale University has been publishing the Environmental Performance Index (EPI) and ranking countries according to their environmental health and ecosystem vitality. The EPI uses 32 performance indicators across eleven issue categories:

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Biden Administration Reportedly Plans to Restart Trump-Era ‘Remain in Mexico’ Policy

The Biden administration is set to restart the Trump administration’s “Remain in Mexico” policy following a court order, according to a Biden administration official.

The policy, which is also known as Migrant Protection Protocols (MPP), started in Dec. 2018 to keep asylum seekers in Mexico while they awaited immigration court proceedings. President Joe Biden revoked the policy soon after taking office.

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Racine Sheriff Calls for Removal of Supervisor Who Posted Bail for Accused Gun Thief

A Racine Sheriff called for the removal of a supervisor over posting bail for an alleged gun thief. Racine County Sheriff Christopher Schmaling says that a county supervisor needs to be removed from his position after he posted bail for a man who is accused of stealing three sheriff’s SWAT team guns.

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Arizona House Member Introduces Bill to Teach Ills of Communism in Schools

A member of the Arizona House of Representatives is introducing legislation meant to teach Arizona’s K-12 students the ills of communism. 

“This is very personal to me, as someone who has survived a communist war,” said State Rep. Quang Nguyen (R-District 1) in a Tuesday press release.  “I have lost very close family members to the evil ideology of communism. I know what it feels to lose a nation to communism and that’s why I do not want my fellow Arizonans to ever go through what I have.  It is up to us to ensure that future generations have an honest understanding of what communism truly is and the horrors it has produced for mankind.  Otherwise, it is likely to be repeated.  The victims and survivors of communism deserve to have their voice heard.” 

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Judge Denies Stay on Seminole Gaming Compact Ruling

A federal judge has denied a stay on the Seminole Tribe of Florida’s sports betting compact with the State of Florida. A ruling earlier in the week blocked the agreement between the tribe and the state.

As of Thursday, the Seminole Tribe’s Hard Rock Sportsbook was still operational and accepting sports bets.

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Thousands Formerly Incarcerated Get Michigan IDs, Driver’s Licenses

The Michigan Department of State (MDOS) has provided more than 5,000 state identification cards and driver’s licenses to parolees through its joint initiative with the Michigan Department of Corrections (MDOC).

The program offers newly paroled Michiganders a driver’s license or state ID has boosted these transactions by more than 10 times the prior amount.

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Florida Men Charged with Falsifying Voter Registration Forms

Two Jacksonville men have been charged with registering dead people to vote. Devin Deangelo King and Jordan Rayeshaun Daniels have both been arrested, and the motive does not appear to be political, but personal financial gain.

“This was a group working with what we call a third-party organization,” said Duval County Supervisor of Elections Mike Hogan. “… We did not see anything political about it. It was, I think, people who were greedy. There’s an incentive there to get as many as you can in.”

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Ohio State House Rep Crusading Against Traffic Cameras

One Ohio lawmaker is on a crusade to do away with traffic cameras across the state, and especially in the small town of Linndale, described as “Northeast Ohio’s most notorious speed trap.”

“Speed cameras are not law enforcement. Speed cameras are not a public safety measure. Speed cameras are only a cash register for the cities or villages involved,” State Rep. Tom Patton (District 7) told WJKW. “I have four bills I am going to drop that deal with cities and the use of speed cameras.”

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Catholic University Responds to Claims of ‘Blasphemous’ George Floyd Painting

Catholic University of America (CUA) in Washington, D.C., has responded to several reports of a painting of George Floyd depicted as Jesus that hangs in its law school.

“The painting was put in place last February in a ceremony outside the law school’s Mary Mirror of Justice chapel. The press began covering it this week, leading to criticism on social media and a substantial number of emails and phone calls,” President John Garvey said in an open letter. “Some critics called the image blasphemous because they saw it as deifying or canonizing George Floyd. Some comments that we received were thoughtful and reasonable. Some were offensive and racist. Much of the criticism came from people unconnected to the University.”

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E-Cigarette Giant Agrees to Pay Settlement with Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich

Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich and e-cigarette maker Juul Labs on Tuesday reached an agreement for a suit that alleged the company committed deceptive and unfair acts and practices.

The settlement will require the company to pay $14.5 million and make significant changes to its corporate practices in an effort to not sell to minors.

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St. Paul Police Union Files Lawsuit Opposing COVID Vaccine Mandate

The union for St. Paul police officers filed a lawsuit over a COVID vaccine mandate that will be in place in the new year. The mandate does not allow for testing and masking as a substitute for getting vaccinated, however they will allow medical and religious exemptions, sources say.

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Virginia Department of Corrections Vacancy Rate Has Grown to 27.4 Percent Since Start of Pandemic

The Virginia Department of Corrections (VADOC) had a vacancy rate of 27.4 percent, or 1,680 correctional officer vacancies by September 30, 2021, according to a November 15 report from the Public Safety Compensation Work Group. That’s an increase from the average number of vacancies between fiscal years 2018 and 2020, which ranged between 650 and 682 each year.

“There was a dramatic increase since the beginning of the pandemic,” House Appropriations Committee Analyst Michael Jay told the Joint Committee of the House Health, Welfare and Institutions and Public Safety and Senate Judiciary on Tuesday.

“Since then it has gone up about 60 each month and it is now at almost 1,700 vacancies. Some individual facilities have seen higher vacancies, with one correctional facility having turnover of 54 percent in the last calendar year,” Jay said.

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Ohio GOP Gubernatorial Candidate Jim Renacci to Announce His Lieutenant Governor Pick

Ohio GOP gubernatorial candidate Jim Renacci will announce his pick for Lieutenant Governor on Thursday, December 2nd in West Chester Township, according to an emailed press release.

Throughout his campaign, Renacci has portrayed his potential administration as a more conservative alternative to Governor Mike DeWine and Lieutenant Governor Jon Husted.

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Senator Marsha Blackburn Pens Letter to YouTube Slamming the Social Media Giant for Aiding the Chinese Communist Party by Demonetizing News Video

On Monday, Tennessee Senator Marsha Blackburn (R-TN) penned a letter to YouTube after it was revealed the social media giant demonetized a news video discussing a story how former Chinese Vice Premier Zhang Gaoli allegedly sexually assaulted Chinese tennis star Peng Shuai.

An episode of Breaking Points, a popular YouTube show hosted by Saagar Enjeti and Krystal Ball, was demonetized after it ran a segment discussing the disappearance of the tennis star, the Federalist reports.

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Cook Political Report Shifts Democrat-Held Georgia, Arizona and Nevada Senate Seats to ‘Toss Up’

The Senate and governors editor for The Cook Political Report told The Star News Network the collapse of popular support for President Joseph R. Biden Jr., was one of the critical factors driving the political prognosticating site’s decision to move Senate races in Georgia, Arizona and Nevada to ‘Toss Up.’

“We never start an incumbent out in ‘Toss Up,’ until they have an opponent,” said Jessica Taylor, about the changes to move the three Democrats, Arizona’s Sen. Mark A. Kelly, Georgia’s Sen. Raphael G. Warnock and Nevada’s Sen. Catherine M. Cortez-Mastro from the presumption that they were favored for reelection.

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Commentary: Five Trump-Russia ‘Collusion’ Corrections We Need from the Media Now

Five years after the Hillary Clinton campaign-funded collection of Trump-Russia conspiracy theories known as the Steele dossier was published by BuzzFeed, news outlets that amplified its false allegations have suffered major losses of credibility. The recent indictment of the dossier’s main source, Igor Danchenko, for allegedly lying to the FBI, has catalyzed a new reckoning.

In response to what the news site Axios has called “one of the most egregious journalistic errors in modern history,” the Washington Post has re-edited at least a dozen stories related to Steele. For two of those, the Post removed entire sections, changed headlines, and added lengthy editor’s notes.

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As Crisis in Ethiopia Unfolds, Biden Admin Prepares for a Second Afghanistan

As Ethiopia heads towards a potential collapse, the Biden administration worries the situation will turn into another Afghanistan, Axios reported.

The government of Ethiopia has called on its citizens to arm themselves as rebels make their way towards the capital, Addis Ababa, Axios reported. The rebels are reportedly from the Tigray region, where concerns have risen about ethnic cleansing and the use of starvation by the government as a tactic of war.

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Hundreds of Google Employees Sign Letter Opposing Company’s Vaccine Mandate

A group of roughly 600 Google employees signed onto a letter opposing the tech giant’s company-wide vaccination mandate and called for its repeal.

Google first imposed a requirement in July that all of its in-person workers be vaccinated against COVID-19. The company is now asking all of its workers, including those working from home, to upload their vaccination status to the company website by Dec. 3 due to the federal contractor vaccine requirement, according to CNBC.

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Racine County Sheriff to File Charges Against Wisconsin Election Commission Members

The Racine County Sheriff’s Office announced that it will file criminal charges against five of the six members of the Wisconsin Election Commission.

Sheriff Schmaling recommended charges to Racine County District Attorney Patricia Hanson for Commissioners Margaret Bostelmann, Julie Glancey, Ann Jacobs, Dean Knudson, and Mark Thomsen. The charges for each commissioner include two felonies and three misdemeanors.

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Remote Learning Lowered Test Scores in Every State Surveyed, Disproportionately Affected Minorities

Remote learning led to declines in test scores in English and math when compared to the scores of schools that had more in-person learning, according to a paper published by the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER).

Leadership throughout the COVID-19 pandemic forced many schools to close in an effort to prevent the spread of the virus, but many schools remained closed throughout the 2020-2021 school year. According to new research from the NBER, remote learning had a negative impact on students’ test scores in English language arts (ELA) and math in all 12 states studied. Declines in scores were smaller for students who continued in-person learning.

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Biden Admin Invites Taiwan to ‘Summit for Democracy,’ China Calls It a ‘Mistake’

The Biden administration extended an invitation for its “Summit for Democracy” to Taiwan, upsetting China, which views the island as its own.

The list of invitees for the summit, which will be held in December, was released Tuesday by the State Department. The gathering was originally announced in February, with three main themes, “defending against authoritarianism, fighting corruption, and promoting respect for human rights,” according to the White House.

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Commentary: Rittenhouse Case Highlights a House Divided on Self-Defense

The conclusion of the Kyle Rittenhouse trial, in which the 18-year-old was found not guilty of murder or assault in the shootings of three rioters in the city of Kenosha, Wisconsin, reflects a widening gap in how Americans conceive of justice and self-defense. 

For those cheering Rittenhouse’s exoneration, the case was a prototypical demonstration of rights and obligations of republican citizenship. A lawfully armed Rittenhouse joined with neighbors, in the absence of effective governance, to protect lives and property by putting out fires, cleaning up damage, and offering medical assistance to the injured. When he was directly assaulted for engaging in this activity, Rittenhouse defended himself, harming no one who had not directly placed him under reasonable fear for his life.

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Despite New Congressional Map, Georgia U.S. Representative Andrew Clyde Will Run Again for Ninth District

Representative Andrew Clyde (R-GA-09) announced this week that he plans to run for re-election in Georgia’s Ninth Congressional District. This, despite members of the Georgia General Assembly recently drawing him out of his current seat and into the newly vacant 10th District.

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Florida Man Pleads Guilty to Don Gaetz Extortion Effort

A Florida man, Stephen Alford, has plead guilty regarding his involvement in attempting to extort $25 million from Congressman Matt Gaetz’s (R-FL-1) father, former Florida Senate President Don Gaetz.

The latest development is part of a sex trafficking investigation where Stephen Alford attempted to secure a presidential pardon for Matt Gaetz, as Gaetz continues to face questions surrounding his friendship with former Seminole County, Fla. tax collector Joel Greenberg and Gaetz’s involvement into allegations that he had sex with a 17-year-old arranged by Greenberg.

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University of Florida President Supports Testimony by Political Science Professors

After months of back and forth between University of Florida (UF) and three of its political-science professors who were blocked from participating in a high profile lawsuit against Florida’s new election law, UF President Kent Fuchs approved a report Tuesday that called for that decision to be reversed.

In a separate report sent to an accrediting organization, UF denied that its Board of Trustees or any outside forces influenced their previous decision to prevent professors, Sharon Austin, Michael McDonald and Daniel Smith, from testifying against the law that was approved by Florida Governor Ron DeSantis during the 2021 legislative session that ended in April.

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Wisconsin State Rep. Duchow Pushes Constitutional Amendment for Tougher Bail

GoFundMe’s about-face on facilitating donations to legal funds for Kyle Rittenhouse after his acquittal Friday is prompting questions about comparable fundraisers it left up for anti-police rioters and left-wing activists accused of violence.

The massive crowdfunding platform, whose biggest fundraisers include several left-wing causes, explained that its “long-standing policy” prohibits raising money for individuals charged with a violent crime.

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Minnesota Restaurants to Pay Thousands in Fines for Violating COVID Lockdowns

Two Minnesota restaurants, Boardwalk Bar and Grill and a chain named Shady’s, will need to fork over $25,000 and $30,000 in fines respectively for violating COVID lockdown orders in 2020.

The restaurants are obligated to pay the fines after settling lawsuits filed against them by Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison, according to a press release.

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Arizona Attorney General Brnovich Responds to Reporter Asking If He’s Had the Vaccine: ‘Have You Had an STD?’

During a press conference announcing his lawsuit with police officers and firefighters against the City of Phoenix over its COVID-19 vaccine mandate, Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich was asked by Arizona’s Family political editor Dennis Welch whether he was vaccinated. His press secretary waved the question off as “inappropriate.” 

However, Brnovich, who is running for U.S. Senate, responded, “Do you have an STD?” After a brief pause with some laughter from those present, he went on, “It’s not a ridiculous question. The question should be, once you allow or cede this authority to the federal government, where does it stop? And my own health information is my own health information.” 

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Michigan Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson Lifts Driver’s License Suspensions for 150,000

Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson announced that her department has lifted suspensions on the driver’s licenses of more than 150,000 Michiganders after implementing new laws last month.

The department lifted the suspensions of 12,000 Michiganders in October. Michiganders who are now eligible for a driver’s license may still need to pay a reinstatement fee or renew or reapply for a license, depending on how long the license was suspended.

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Ohio Flush with Cash After COVID Relief, Infrastructure Bill

Cleveland sign in downtown Cleveland, Ohio

After its major cities raked in more than six billion dollars from President Joe Biden’s American Rescue Plan for COVID-19 relief, Ohio will once again be flush with federal cash. 

The state is expected to receive more than$10 billion from the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act, which is meant to be spent on rebuilding roads, bridges and other public structures, according to reports. 

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After Two-Month Review, Fairfax County Public Schools Returns ‘Lawn Boy’ and ‘Gender Queer’ to High School Libraries

Fairfax County Public Schools (FCPS) has decided to return two controversial books to its high school library after completing a two-month review launched after a parent complained at a September school board meeting.

In a press release, Assistant Superintendent Noel Klimenko said, “I am satisfied that the books were selected according to FCPS regulations and are appropriate to include in libraries that serve high school students. Both books have value beyond their pages for students who may struggle to find relatable stories.”

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Republican Gubernatorial Hopeful Compares Whitmer to Soviet-Era ‘Yugo’ Automobile

A former car dealership mogul has thrown his hat into the race to be the next governor of Michigan, intending to run against Gov. Gretchen Whitmer (D).

Kevin Rinke is a Republican who made a fortune in the car business. He said he will put $10 million of his own into defeating Whitmer, who has spent her term in office plagued by scandals.

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Tennessee U.S. Rep. Mark Green Joins Colleague Diana Harshbarger on Natural Immunity Is Real Act

U.S. Representative Mark Green (R-TN-07) said he will co-sponsor legislation that U.S. Representative Diana Harshbarger (R-TN-01) filed titled the Natural Immunity is Real Act. The bill, if enacted into law, would require federal agencies to consider naturally acquired immunity from a previous COVID infection when issuing any rules or regulations aimed at protecting from COVID-19.

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Former GOP Rep. Barletta: I Am Running for Keystone State Governor to Undo Wolf’s Mismanagement of COVID-19, Crime, Economy & Schools

The former Republican congressman running for governor of Pennsylvania told The Star News Network drove him to run for governor after watching families and businesses suffer under Gov. Thomas W. Wolf and his pandemic policies.

“Actually, watching how Governor Wolf mismanaged the pandemic,” said Louis J. “Lou” Barletta, who left his House seat to challenge Democratic Sen. Robert P. Casey Jr., in 2018. Wolf is term-limited and cannot run for a third term.

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