Governor Lee Encourages Law Enforcement Officers to Relocate to Tennessee

Tennessee Governor Bill Lee on Wednesday made a nationwide pitch to law enforcement officers to relocate to Tennessee and join the state’s law enforcement agency.

In the video, Lee detailed the benefits of moving to the state for officers who live in Democrat-controlled states like New York and California.

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Welcome Packet Reveals Concierge Travel Service for Biden Illegals, Courtesy of Nonprofits

Acting Executive Officer of the RGV U.S. Border Patrol Sector Oscar Escamilla, left, fields questions from tour participants as Secretary of Homeland Security Alejandro N. Mayorkas, right, leads a delegation of Congressional representatives on a tour of U.S. Customs and Border Protection Donna Processing Facility in Donna, Texas, May 7, 2021. Secretary Mayorkas updated the delegation on unaccompanied children arriving at our Southern Border as they viewed conditions at the facility. CBP Photo by Michael Battise

Like travel agents preparing customers for a cruise, nonprofits working with the Biden administration have created detailed itineraries and information packets to help illegal aliens travel to wherever they want to go in the U.S., according to documents obtained by a Texas congressman.

Often courtesy of American taxpayers struggling to pay their bills during surging inflation, illegals are given free quality hotel rooms, plane tickets and transportation to the airport, travel maps, and instructions to TSA to bypass photo ID requirements, according to the documents shared with Just the News.

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OSHA Suspends Vaccine Mandate After Emergency Temporary Standard Struck Down by Court

After The Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled Friday to keep its stay of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s (OSHA) emergency rule that would require employers of more than 100 employees to mandate COVID-19 vaccines in place, the federal agency says that it will no longer pursue private sector vaccine mandates at this time. 

“On November 12, 2021, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit granted a motion to stay OSHA’s COVID-19 Vaccination and Testing Emergency Temporary Standard, published on November 5, 2021 (86 Fed. Reg. 61402) (“ETS”),” OSHA said in a statement. “The court ordered that OSHA ‘take no steps to implement or enforce’ the ETS ‘until further court order.’ While OSHA remains confident in its authority to protect workers in emergencies, OSHA has suspended activities related to the implementation and enforcement of the ETS pending future developments in the litigation.”

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Several City Council Districts in Nashville and Memphis, Tennessee Likely to Shift

Metropolitan Nashville’s (MetroNashville) Council, the legislature for the city of Nashville and Davidson County, is currently preparing to consider a second draft of the its newly revised Council-district map.

A number of Nashville Council’s 35 districts stand to change dramatically, particularly with districts losing land mass in the city’s northeast, as population growth there has not kept pace with the city’s southern area.

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Commentary: Prosecution of Project Veritas Sounds Warning About Two-Tier Justice and Big State Corruption

James O'Keefe

Whatever else can be said about the FBI’s vendetta against James O’Keefe and Project Veritas, his investigative journalism enterprise, it is a useful reminder of two things: 1) that we increasingly live in a two-tier society in which the lower tier can expect the arbitrary intrusion of all the coercive elements of the state, and 2) that the fundamental legitimacy of many important American institutions is draining away rapidly like a full bathtub that is suddenly unplugged.

Scott Johnson at Powerline has an excellent summary of the case thus far.

Last Thursday, the FBI conducted a raid against two former employees of Project Veritas.

A few days later, they conducted a dawn raid against O’Keefe himself. It was the full monty.

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Williamson County Greenlights $2.5 Million to Purchase More School Buses Despite Driver Shortage

The Williamson County School Board voted to purchase 25 new school busses for the 2022 school year. The board met Monday night, where they discussed the school’s need for the new vehicles.

During the meeting, it was said that due to the country’s supply chain shortages, the school board decided that it was best to order the buses now. Superintendent Jason Golden added that it was because of their current busses age and millage.

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Mayor John Cooper Announces New Director for Nashville Department of Transportation

Nashville Mayor John Cooper announced in a press release the new director for the Nashville Department of Transportation. Diana Alarcon will begin her new position on January 10. Cooper said he was grateful for Alarcon to be taking over the position.

“With her deep experience in guiding cities through important periods of transportation and infrastructure growth,” Cooper said, “Diana’s leadership will be central to creating Nashville’s own mobility future.”

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Tennessee Christian School Teaches God Made Only Males and Females, Infuriating Shelby County Commissioner and LGBTQ Activists

A private Christian school in West Tennessee has triggered LGBTQ activists as well as Shelby County Commissioner Tami Sawyer into an angry frenzy.

Officials at Briarcrest Christian School, in Eads, held a training session for parents and students about how to respond Biblically to gender theory. A flyer for the event, which school officials held November 9, asked participants to “look into the craziness our culture is throwing at our kids.”

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New Iowa GOP Poll Shows Trump 4-to-1 Favorite Over DeSantis

A new poll released Monday shows that President Donald J. Trump is the overwhelming choice of Iowa Republicans with support from 56 percent of respondents compared to 12 percent supporting Florida Ronald D. “Ron” DeSantis in the poll conducted November 3 through November 5, and November 8 and 12, by Neighborhood Research and Media.

Neighborhood Research and Media asked participants: “If the 2024 Iowa Caucus were today, who would be your first choice for president?”

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Wyoming GOP Votes to No Longer Recognize Liz Cheney as a Republican

On Saturday, a meeting of the Wyoming Republican Party led to the passage of a resolution expelling Congresswoman Liz Cheney (R-Wyo.) from the party and no longer recognizing her as a member, as reported by CNN.

The resolution was passed by the Wyoming GOP Central Committee, by a vote of 31 to 29. Although the measure does not actually wield any direct power over Cheney, it marks the latest symbolic blow to the incumbent representative as a result of her frequent anti-Trump statements, which have all but eroded her popular support in her own state.

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Commentary: Illegal Immigrants Would Get $10.5 Billion From Reconciliation Bill

U.S. Customs and Border Protection operations following the implementation of Title 42 USC 265 at the northern and southern land borders. U.S. Border Patrol agents use personal protective equipment as they prepare to process a group of individuals encountered near Sasabe, Ariz. on March 22, 2020. CBP Photo by Jerry Glaser

The budget reconciliation package pushed by Democrats creates a new expanded child tax credit (CTC) that would pay illegal immigrants some $10.5 billion next year. All immigrants with children are eligible, regardless of how they got here and whether their children are U.S.-born. This includes the roughly 600,000 unaccompanied minors and persons in family units stopped at the border in FY2021 and released into the country pending a hearing. Cash welfare to illegal immigrants is not just costly; it also encourages more illegal immigration. 

Although it is referred to as a “refundable credit,” the new CTC, like the old additional child tax credit (ACTC) it replaces, pays cash to low-income families who do not pay any federal income tax. The new program significantly increases the maximum cash payment from $1,400 per child to $3,600 for children under 6, and to $3,000 for children ages 6 to 17. After 2022, the maximum payment would be $2,000 per child, but advocates hope the much larger payments will be extended. 

In an analysis conducted in October, my colleague Karen Zeigler and I estimated that illegal immigrants with U.S.-born children would receive $8.2 billion from the new CTC. However, we had assumed that the new program, like the old ACTC, would require children claimed as dependents to have Social Security numbers (SSNs).  But reconciliation (page 1452, line 14) would permanently repeal this requirement. 

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Commentary: Trump Is Necessary to Restore Two-Party Rule

Donald Trump waving

In his most recent column, George Will, dean of serious American political commentators and high priest of Trump-hate, broke new ground in the reconciliation of buyer’s remorse over last year’s election and visceral aversion to Donald Trump. Will counseled Joe Biden’s entourage to tighten the cocoon that protects him from journalistic scrutiny or any form of spontaneity in public, lest Trump be reelected in 2024.

I have agreed with Will on almost everything between the 1964 and 2016 elections, and we have been cordial acquaintances for 40 years, although among its other regrettable side effects, the Trump phenomenon seems to have paused contact between us. George Will now purports to believe that the disappearance of Trump, which he had assured himself and his readers was inevitable if it were only possible to evict him from office last year, is necessary for the restoration of two-party rule.

With respect, I offer an alternative view. Trump is instrumental in the restoration of two-party rule.

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Poll: Biden Approval Rating Hits New Low

President Joe Biden’s approval rating has dropped to its lowest level since taking office.

A new Washington Post-ABC News poll found that Biden’s approval rating has plummeted in recent months among steadily rising inflation, a difficult withdrawal from Afghanistan, and other economic issues.

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Missouri Sues Large School District for Breaking Open Record Laws on Critical Race Theory Materials

Missouri Attorney General Eric Schmitt on Tuesday sued one of the state’s largest school districts, alleging it has violated open records laws in an effort to thwart public disclosure of critical race theory training materials for teachers and curriculum for students.

Schmitt’s lawsuit charges the Springfield Public Schools with 13 counts of violating the state Sunshine Law that include charging exorbitant fees for records. The move comes a day after Just the News reported that the school district’s training materials suggested teachers could be engaged in white supremacist behavior just by insisting on English language in classes, calling police on a black suspect or using the term “All lives matter.”

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Gov. Ducey, Arizona National Guard Won’t Answer Sun Times Questions About Joining Oklahoma National Guard’s COVID-19 Vaccine Mandate Rebuke

National Guard members in uniform, wearing masks

Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey and the Arizona National Guard did respond to queries from The Arizona Sun Times regarding whether Arizona would follow the lead of Oklahoma and its National Guard decision not to enforce the Pentagon’s COVID-19 vaccine mandate.

A source familiar with the Arizona National Guard’s vaccine policy told that commanders in the Arizona National Guard have already begun ordering troops to get the vaccine.

The source said based on their understanding of the internal dynamics of the Arizona Guard Ducey could reverse this vaccination push and follow Oklahoma’s lead.

While Ducey remains silent, Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich, now running for the 2022 GOP Senate nomination, sued the Biden administration twice over the mandate.

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JP Morgan Sues Tesla, Says Company Owes It $162 Million

Investment bank JP Morgan filed a complaint against Tesla late Monday alleging the electric car company owes the firm over $162 million.

The complaint centers on stock warrants, financial instruments allowing a buyer to purchase shares at a set price within a certain length of time, that JP Morgan bought from Tesla in 2014. The two firms agreed to a “strike price” at the time of purchase, and they agreed that if Tesla’s share price exceeded the strike price within the agreed-upon length of time, the electric car company would have to give JP Morgan stock or cash equivalent to the difference in prices, JP Morgan said in the complaint.

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Biden Loses Legal Battle, COVID Confidence as Vaccine Mandate Stalls

President Joe Biden is struggling to win in court as well as the court of public opinion when it comes to his response to COVID-19.

Biden’s approval rating on his handling of the pandemic has steadily dropped as he has issued more vaccine mandates, with one of those mandates seemingly dead in the water.

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Maury County Mayor Andy Ogles and the Repercussions of Federal Government Overreach of COVID

Andy Ogles

Tuesday morning on the Tennessee Star Report, host Michael Patrick Leahy welcomed Mayor Andy Ogles of Maury County to discuss federal government overreach and resisting COVID mandates safely.

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Commentary: Thinking Critically About ‘Critical Thinking’

“We must never,” Bismarck is said to have warned, “look into the origins of laws or sausages.” Sage advice, I’ve always thought (and no pun intended with that “sage”)—but how much at odds it is with the dominant current of modern thought, which is to say Enlightenment thought.

Immanuel Kant, a great hero of the Enlightenment, summed up the alternative to Bismarck’s counsel when, in an essay called “What is Enlightenment?,” he offered Sapere Aude, Dare to know!, as a motto for the movement. Enlightened man, Kant thought, was the first real adult: the first to realize his potential as an autonomous being—a being, as the etymology of the word implies, who “gives the law to himself.” As Kant stressed, this was a moral as well as an intellectual achievement, since it involved courage as much as insight: courage to put aside convention, tradition, and superstition (how the three tended to coalesce for Enlightened thinkers!) in order to rely for guidance on the dictates of reason alone.

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Democrat-Led House Planning to Vote on Biden’s $2 Trillion Social Spending Bill by Friday: Hoyer

Steny Hoyer

House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer told reporters on Tuesday that House leadership plans to hold a vote on final passage of President Biden’s $2 trillion Build Back Better Act by Friday at the latest.

Biden’s social spending bill contains new federal benefit programs and about $550 billion for climate change initiatives.

“I expect to consider most of the debate, perhaps not all, but most of the debate on Build Back Better on Tuesday, excuse me, on Wednesday, today’s Tuesday, on Wednesday, tomorrow,” Hoyer said during a news conference.

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Federally Funded Non-Profits Are Running Illegal Immigrant Processing Centers in Nice Hotels, Helping Migrants Avoid Arrest

The Biden administration has deputized non-profit groups to move illegal migrants across the nation, allowing the charities to put them up in nice hotels and give them instructions on how to avoid capture.

Rep. Lance Gooden (R-Texas) said Monday that a whistleblower told him about an ongoing operation in San Diego, and decided to go there to see for himself what is going on.

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Mayor Andy Ogles on the Efficacy of Masks and COVID Legislation

Two girls running down a hill wearing face masks

Tuesday morning on the Tennessee Star Report, host Michael Patrick Leahy welcomed Mayor Andy Ogles in studio to discuss the efficacy of masks, mandates, and current Tennessee legislation.

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Retail Sales Grew in October as Shoppers Faced Higher Prices Entering the Holiday Season

U.S. retail sales increased in October as shoppers faced the largest price increase in 30 years entering the holiday season.

Retail sales, a measure of how much consumers spent on goods, increased 1.7% in October, far exceeding September’s 0.7% figure, the U.S. Census Bureau reported Tuesday. Core sales, excluding autos, jumped 1.7% in October.

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Senate Majority Leader ‘Fighting Jack Johnson’ Weighs in on Mask Mandate Stay Ruling

Senate Majority Leader Jack Johnson

Tuesday morning on the Tennessee Star Report, host Michael Patrick Leahy welcomed State Senate Majority Leader Jack Johnson to the newsmakers line to discuss the recent ruling by Obama appointed Sixth Circuit Court Judge to stay mask mandates after Omnibus Bill passing.

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Judicial Watch Pushes Five States to Clean Voter Rolls, or Face Federal Lawsuits

Woman voting at booth

The watchdog group Judicial Watch has sent letters to election officials in 14 counties across five states notifying them of apparent violations of the 1993 National Voter Registration Act.

The law mandates that all states “conduct a general program that makes a reasonable effort to remove” from its voter rolls the names of ineligible voters who have either died or moved.

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Georgia Governor Brian Kemp and Attorney General Chris Carr Challenge Joe Biden’s COVID-19 Vaccine Mandate for Health Care Workers

Georgia Governor Brian Kemp and Attorney General Chris Carr on Tuesday announced the state has filed a lawsuit challenging the Biden administration’s COVID-19 vaccine mandate for health care workers.

Kemp and Carr announced this in an emailed press release.

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Whistleblower Accuses FBI of Using Counterterrorism Tools Against Concerned Parents

On behalf of the House Judiciary Committee, Rep. Jim Jordan (R-OH-04) Tuesday sent a letter to Attorney General Merrick Garland claiming that a whistleblower provided the committee with information that contradicts Garland’s own Oct. 21 testimony.

The National School Boards Association colluded with the White House before sending a September letter to President Joe Biden accusing parents who have protested Critical Race Theory (CRT) and other liberal agendas in public schools around the country of being “domestic terrorists,” terminology for which it later apologized. Subsequently, Garland sent out a memo ordering the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) to investigate those parents. 

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Ohio General Assembly Passes Legislation to Qualify Small Businesses as ‘Essential’ During Health Emergencies

Legislation to allow all businesses to qualify as “essential” and have an equal opportunity to remain open during a future public health emergency has passed the Ohio Senate.

Unanimous Senate passage on November 16 of Amended House Bill 215 – or the Business Fairness Act – seeks to prevent the wholesale closure of businesses such as smaller Ohio retailers considered “non-essential” under Ohio Health Department’s orders at the onslaught of COVID-19 20 months ago.

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Former President Trump Endorses John Gibbs in Primary Challenge Against Michigan Rep. Peter Meijer

Former President Donald Trump on Monday endorsed John Gibbs, a former member of his administration, in a GOP primary challenge against Representative Peter Meijer (R-MI-03).

Trump, who has remained critical of Meijer after the incumbent supported an impeachment resolution against the former president, said that Gibbs would better represent the district.

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Florida-Style OSHA Bill Ready to be Heard on House Floor

A bill that would create a state counterpart to the federal government’s Occupational Safety and Health (OSHA) is primed and ready to be considered on the floor of the Florida House. While the bill would not create the new state department outright, it would develop a plan to seek federal approval to create it.

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University of Minnesota Tells Students to Check the Race of Authors They Cite

Libraries, the peer review process, algorithms and data are all racist, according to the University of Minnesota.

The university maintains a research guide that “shares racist research systems and practices, followed by resources for mitigating those problematic systems and practices,” Campus Reform first reported. This guide alleges that virtually every academic resource is racist but that students can overcome institutional racism by abandoning traditional academic standards.

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Rebecca Kleefisch Sues WEC over Election Laws, Democrats to Boycott Meetings with Gableman

Rebecca Kleefisch

The Republican frontrunner for governor wants the Wisconsin Supreme Court to rule on election drop boxes, voting in nursing homes, and moving polling places before Election Day. Democrats at the Wisconsin Capitol, on the other hand, are promising not to sit down with the state’s special elections investigator.

Former Lt. Gov. (2011-2019) and 2022 gubernatorial contender Rebecca Kleefisch filed a lawsuit on Monday.

She’s asking the court to set rules for ballot dropboxes, which she says are not allowed under state law. She’s also asking the court to “correct” the Wisconsin Elections Commission on other election laws and on the process to change those laws.

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Loudoun School Board Settles Part of Lawsuit with Tanner Cross

The Loudoun County Public School (LCPS) Board agreed to a settlement of the original claims teacher Tanner Cross made in his lawsuit against the board. The agreement includes a permanent injunction barring the board from retaliating against Cross for speaking against the school’s transgender policy. The school will also pay $20,000 for Cross’ legal fees, and remove any reference to Cross’ suspension from his personnel file. The rest of the lawsuit to block enforcement of the transgender policy is still going forward.

The initial lawsuit was triggered after the school placed Cross on leave following comments at a May 27 school board meeting. He opposed a proposal that would require staff to use students’ preferred pronouns. In a preliminary injunction, Cross was allowed to return to work. On November 15, the Alliance Defending Freedom (ADF), which is representing Cross, announced the settlement of claims in that initial lawsuit.

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Tucson Border Patrol Arrest Convicted Attempted Murderer for Illegal Reentry

Reynaldo Lira-Luqez

The Tucson Station of U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) announced Sunday that it had apprehended a previously convicted attempted murderer attempting to illegally reenter the United States. 

“Records revealed that Reynaldo Lira-Luqez was convicted of multiple felonies in [Miami Dade County, Florida] to include Attempted Second-Degree Murder,” John R. Modlin, Chief Patrol Agent of Tucson Sector CBP said on Twitter. 

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Race for GOP Virginia Seventh District Nomination: Sears Speaks at Campaign Kickoff for Tina Ramirez; Sen. Chase Files Statement of Candidacy

Virginia’s 2021 election cycle isn’t quite over, and redistricting on congressional districts isn’t complete, but GOP candidates are ramping up their campaigns for the nomination in Virginia’s seventh district. On Tuesday, lieutenant governor-elect Winsome Sears spoke at a campaign kickoff for Tina Ramirez, who also ran for the nomination for the seat in 2020.

“Winning feels good, doesn’t it,” Sears said. “We changed things. People have started looking and thinking, well how did they do that? That’s because of you. We did it because you got involved.”

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GOP Senate Campaign Committee Denies Recruiting Arizona Gov. Ducey for Mark Kelly Challenge

The communications director for the National Republican Senatorial Committee denied rumors to the Arizona Sun Times that the NRSC chairman, Sen. Richard L. “Rick” Scott (R.-Fla.), is recruiting Arizona Gov. Douglas A. “Doug” Ducey Jr., to run against Democrat Sen. Mark E. Kelly.

“I think your questions reflect a misunderstanding with what the NRSC does and what Chairman Scott does in terms of recruiting,” said Chris Hartline, who before becoming NRSC communications director, worked in a similar capacity on Scott’s Senate staff.

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New Ad Knocks Senator Mark Kelly for Lack of Action

The National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC) on Tuesday launched a new ad in Arizona against Senator Mark Kelley (D-AZ).

The Spanish radio ad, which will play in three different city media markets, targets Kelly over his lack of action since taking office earlier this year.

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20 Months into Pandemic, over 20,000 Michigan State Workers Remote

Woman working in the evening on her laptop

Twenty months after the COVID-19 pandemic struck Michigan, downtown Lansing hasn’t recovered fully. Half of the state’s roughly 48,000 employees are still working remotely.

The disappearance of daily consumption habits of more than 22,000 state workers have hurt local businesses, whether that’s grabbing a bagel from The New Daily Bagel, rolls from AnQi Sushi Express or a shake from Soul Nutrition. Some businesses have adjusted accordingly, cutting hours, closing locations, and reducing menus.

The Michigan Department of Technology, Management, and Budget (DTMB) Spokesman Caleb Buhs said about half of state workers are working remotely on a daily basis.

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Georgia Rep. Austin Scott Leads Bipartisan Push to Lower India’s Tariffs on Pecans, a Major Georgia Export

U.S. Representative Austin Scott (R-GA-08) and 22 other members of the House want U.S. Trade Representative Katherine Tai to help reduce India’s tariffs on American pecans.

India currently has a 36 percent tariff on American pecans, far higher than the 10 percent tariff on other American tree nuts, like pistachios and almonds.

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Scottsdale School Board President Stripped of Title, Refuses to Resign

Jann-Michael Greenburg

The head of the Scottsdale Unified School District has lost his gavel after his peers have voted to strip him of his title and asked for his resignation, which he flatly refused.

Jann-Michael Greenburg is under investigation by school district officials and the Scottsdale Police Department for his alleged involvement in keeping and sharing a set of online files containing personal information of parents who opposed the board’s COVID-19 mitigations, including information on some of their children. 

Greenburg’s father, Michael Greenburg, was listed as the owner of the files before they were taken from public view, according to the Scottsdale Independent.

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Florida Governor DeSantis Announces Request for $25 Million to Repair Freedom Tower Amid Cuban Protests

Ron DeSantis announcing repairs for Freedom Tower

Four months after the island-wide Cuban protests in July, new protests brought together by the Assembly of Cuban Resistance on Monday encouraged Nicaraguan and Venezuelan exiles in South Florida to join in on pro-democracy demonstrations.

The same day, Florida Governor Ron DeSantis announced a request for $25 million to repair the Freedom Tower in downtown Miami that was the main location for processing and documenting Cuban refugees escaping to Miami during the Cold War. The Freedom Tower now serves as a museum and offices for Miami Dade College.

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Tennessee Restaurant Owner Sentenced to Federal Prison for Alien Harboring and Tax Fraud Conspiracy

A Clarksville restaurant owner on Tuesday was sentenced to 20 months in federal prison on a host of charges: conspiracy to harbor illegal aliens, harboring illegal aliens, money laundering, tax evasion, and employment tax fraud.

Quanwei Shi, who owns the New China Buffet and Grill (NCBG), was arrested in April 2020 and indicted on 14 charges, stemming from an investigation into the restaurant.

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