Michigan’s Nessel Gets Drunk at College Football Game, Wheeled Out of Stadium

Michigan’s Attorney General Dana Nessel (D) claims that two Bloody Marys on an empty stomach led to her being drunkenly wheeled out of Spartan Stadium on Oct. 30, while the University of Michigan (UM) played Michigan State University (MSU) in a rivalry college football matchup.

On Facebook, Nessel, Michigan’s top attorney, posted a photo of herself slumped over in her seat during the game, with a long explainer attempting to joke her way out of the incident, and noting that “my staff has pleaded with me to hire a crisis-management PR firm,” but that she would rather handle the explaining herself. 

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New Jersey Senate President Concedes Race to Republican Truck Driver

In a major upset, New Jersey’s Senate President Steve Sweeney conceded the race Wednesday to his Republican opponent Edward Durr, who spent a total of about $2,000 on his entire campaign.

“The results of Tuesday’s election are in. All votes have been fairly counted. And I, of course, accept the results,” Sweeney said during a news conference.

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Wisconsin School Boards Group Withdraws from National Group over Parental Terrorism Letter

Wisconsin’s Association of School Boards resigned from the national group responsible for sending a letter to President Biden in which it asked for help investigating threats from angry parents.

The WASB voted unanimously on Friday to withdraw from the National Association of School Boards.

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Ten States File Lawsuit Attempting to Block Vaccine Mandate for Health Care Workers

Ten Republican state attorneys general filed a lawsuit Wednesday against the Biden administration seeking to block its COVID-19 vaccine mandate for health care workers.

According to The Hill, the lawsuit is being spearheaded by Missouri Attorney General Eric Schmitt, who called the mandate “unconstitutional and unlawful.”

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Man Who Pleaded Guilty to Brutal Murder in Memphis Is an Illegal Alien, ICE Says

A man who was living in Memphis and last year attacked and killed an 18-year-old woman with a machete pleaded guilty last month to second-degree murder — and federal officials said Wednesday he’s an illegal alien. That man, Ledis Sanchez, 36, is from Central America, said Sarah Loicano, spokeswoman for the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE).

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Former President Trump Endorses Congressman Chuck Fleischmann

Former President Donald Trump on Tuesday endorsed U.S. Representative Chuck Fleischmann in his reelection campaign.

Fleischmann, who has represented Tennessee’s third Congressional District since 2011, serves as a member of the House of Representatives’ Appropriations committee.

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Commentary: Veterans Day Is a Chance to Thank Those Who Selflessly Served America

Thursday is Veterans Day. We celebrate Veterans Day on the 11th day of the 11th month of the year, the day the guns fell silent in Europe following the armistice that ended World War I. For some, it’s a day off from school or work, but for the majority of Americans, it means so much more.

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First Day of Child Vaccination Reaches Capacity at Both Metro Nashville Locations

Metro Nashville’s first day of administering COVID vaccinations to children ages 5 to 11 ended after it reached capacity Monday. Two locations offered the shots, Maplewood High School and Cane Ridge High School from 3 pm to 6:30 pm.

The Metro Public Health Department tweeted, “We are encouraged by the response at our drive-thru vaccination event at Maplewood High School. Our team is working as fast as they can to get to everyone as soon as possible. Everyone currently in line will be served, but no more vehicles will be joining the line tonight.”

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Mayor John Cooper Releases Statement After Community Backlash over Homeless Camp Tours

Mayor John Cooper released a statement Tuesday defending his decision to organize tours with Metro Council members of homeless encampments in Nashville. Councilman Colby Sledge tipped the public to the goings-on by the mayor’s office, which prompted citizens’ angry responses.

Cooper’s statement explained the tours were “to help in understanding the intended use of the proposed funding and the installation of cameras in particular. Metro agencies will be present to answer questions, and all visits will be conducted in a manner respectful of the individuals who may be present in the encampments.”

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Ryan Weaver Releases ‘Let’s Talk About Heroes’ for Veteran’s Day

Ryan Weaver is a high-energy, all-American, rockin’ country music artist who proudly served as an active-duty Black Hawk Aviator, Chief Warrant Officer 3 in the United States Army.

Although he had a short history of playing the violin as a child/teen, everyone in his family was in the military so that is the path he initially chose for his career. (Weaver’s grandfather was in WWII and his dad was a Marine along with two brothers and a sister who also served.)

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Inflation Surges to Highest Level in 30 Years

The Consumer Price Index increased 0.9% in October, bringing the key inflation indicator’s year-over-year increase to 6.2% as supply shortages continue and demand grows, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics announced Wednesday.

The year-over-year inflation figure is an increase from September’s 5.3% level, marking the highest level in 30 years, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) report. Economists surveyed by The Wall Street Journal projected the CPI would increase to just 5.9% in October.

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Commentary: New Twists in Durham Probe Reveal FBI Danchenko Recordings and Suspicions of Fiona Hill Lies

The indictment of Igor Danchenko, the “primary sub-source” of Christopher Steele’s infamous dossier, reveals that the FBI electronically recorded several previously undisclosed interviews with the Brookings Institution researcher. Separately, it raises suspicions, according to congressional sources, that his Brookings superior Fiona Hill may have committed perjury when testifying about Steele during President Trump’s first impeachment.

The existence of electronic records of Danchenko speaking to the FBI far more extensively than previously known creates the possibility that much more will come out about the origins of the Steele dossier and the way the opposition research was weaponized. And those under scrutiny in Special Counsel John Durham’s investigation of the origins of the Trump-Russia affair will have to wonder whether information to which they previously attested jibes with the Danchenko recordings.

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Biden’s ‘Marxist’ Treasury Nominee Wants to Bankrupt, ‘Starve’ Fossil Fuel Industry to Tackle Climate Change

President Joe Biden’s nominee for a key Treasury Department role admitted that oil, natural gas and coal firms need to go bankrupt to prevent climate change, a resurfaced video showed.

“Here what I’m thinking about is primarily the coal and oil and gas industry. A lot of the smaller players in that industry are going to probably go bankrupt in short order, at least we want them to go bankrupt if we want to tackle climate change,” Saule Omarova — who the Senate is considering to lead the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency — remarked in a clip uncovered Tuesday by the American Accountability Foundation (AAF), a conservative research group.

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National Political Editor Neil McCabe Weighs in on Kevin McCarthy and the Two Infrastructure Bills That Could

Wednesday morning on the Tennessee Star Report, host Michael Patrick Leahy welcomed National Political Editor for The Star News Network, Neil McCabe, the newsmakers line to discuss the passing of the infrastructure bill and the possibility of another.

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ICE to Send Documents to 78,000 Illegal Migrants Who Were Released into U.S. Without Court Dates

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials announced a plan to send court documents to 78,000 illegal migrants who were released into the U.S. after crossing the southern border this year, CBS News reported on Tuesday.

The documents describe court hearings where migrants can make their cases to stay in the country to an immigration judge, according to CBS News. The documents will include notices to appear and other information typically issued during regular processing.

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Weekly Jobless Claims Drop to New Pandemic Low

The number of Americans who filed new unemployment claims decreased to 267,000 in the week ending Nov. 6 as the labor market continues to improve, the Department of Labor reported Wednesday.

The Labor Department figure shows a 4,000 claim decrease compared to the week ending on Oct. 30, when jobless claims dropped to a revised 271,000. Wednesday’s release marks the lowest number of initial claims since March 14, 2020, when new jobless claims were 256,000.

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Michael Patrick Leahy and Crom Carmichael Discuss the Biden Maladministration’s Lawlessness

Wednesday morning on the Tennessee Star Report, host Michael Patrick Leahy welcomed Crom Carmichael in studio to discuss the Biden administration’s attempt at a broad grasp of federal government powers.

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Google Loses Antitrust Legal Battle, $2.8 Billion Fine Upheld

The European Union (EU) General Court upheld a ruling Wednesday that Google violated EU antitrust law by preferencing its own shopping service in search results.

The European Commission, the EU’s top regulator, ruled in 2017 that Google’s practice of prioritizing its online marketplace in its search results was anti-competitive, slapping the tech giant with a roughly $2.8 billion fine. Google appealed the decision, but the EU General Court, the second-highest court in the continent, upheld the ruling Wednesday.

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Dozens of Navy SEALS File Federal Lawsuit Against Department of Defense for Denying Religious Exemptions to Vaccine Mandate

Dozens of US Navy SEALS and other Naval Special Warfare (NSW) personnel on Tuesday filed a Federal lawsuit against the Biden Administration and the Department of Defense for their refusal to grant religious exemptions to Joe Biden’s unconstitutional COVID-19 vaccine mandate.

The First Liberty Institute, a legal organization dedicated to defending religious liberty for all Americans, is representing 40 active-duty SEALs and three reservists.

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Commentary: Dear Policymakers, Homeschooling Is Here to Stay

Homeschooling is here to stay and the time has come for policymakers to acknowledge that fact. After years of increasing at a rate of about 3 percent a year, the number of parents choosing to homeschool their children has spiked, triggered by the COVID-19 pandemic.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the portion of children being homeschooled doubled from 5.4 percent during the 2019-20 school year to 11 percent in 2020-21. Among Black families, homeschooling jumped nearly five-fold during that time, from 3.3 percent to 16.1 percent.

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Gov. DeSantis Proposes Sweeping Changes to Florida’s Education Budget

Ron DeSantis of Florida

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis proposed sweeping education changes that would impact Florida’s budget. He proposes $1,000 bonuses for teachers, $600 million to raise minimum teacher salaries to $47,500, increased per-student funding to $8,000, and ending the annual standardized testing requirement called the Florida Standards Assessment (FSA).

DeSantis had already provided $1,000 bonuses for teachers over the summer for their work during the COVID school year and said he wants to do it again to “keep that momentum going.”

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Ohio Cities Spending Federal COVID Relief Dollars on Anything But COVID Relief

Of the $6.6 billion given to Ohio cities in federal pandemic relief funds, much of the money has been allotted for projects unrelated to COVID-19, or has not been allotted for spending at all. 

The American Rescue Plan was signed into law in March, providing a total of $1.9 trillion in federal funds for pandemic relief. That money was spread around the country, and cities were supposed to report their expenditure plans to the federal government by Oct. 31.

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Arizona Lawmaker Calls for Scottsdale School Board President’s Resignation, Prosecution Over Alleged ‘Enemies List’ Database 

On the heels of the exposure of an extensive database of personal and derogatory information local parents say was collected by Scottsdale School Board President Jann-Michael Greenburg, Rep. Jake Hoffman (R-Queen Creek) told The Arizona Sun-Times that Greenburg needs to resign.

“Parents in Scottsdale and across the state are mad as hell over this situation, and rightfully so,” he said. “These allegations are gravely concerning and should be investigated to the fullest extent. If true, Scottsdale Board President Jann-Michael Greenburg should resign in disgrace and be prosecuted for abuse of power. It is unacceptable and anti-American to compile dossiers on your political enemies, especially when those so-called enemies are the very people you were elected to serve.”

Parents of children in the Scottsdale Unified School District (SUSD) discovered that the president of the school district’s school board, Jann-Michael Greenburg, has a Google Drive database containing personal information about some of the parents he’d had conflicts with. Greenburg (who is shown to have edit permissions for the Drive) and his father, Mark (who is listed as the owner of the Drive) told The Scottsdale Independent they had no involvement or knowledge of the database.

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Three Socialists Elected to Minneapolis City Council

Three socialists were elected to the Minneapolis City Council during the November general election. Jason Chavez, a 26 year old, was endorsed by the local chapter of the Democratic Socialists of America (DSA). “People are tired of doing the same thing over and over again,” Chavez said. “This new wave in Minneapolis that just hit with the three of us is something that is going to return power back to regular people.”

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Report: Arizona to Add 700K Jobs by 2030, Triple the U.S. Rate

Arizona’s economic conditions are estimated to attract hundreds of thousands of new workers to the state.

A report from the Arizona Office of Economic Opportunity indicated the state’s economic growth is expected to outpace the national average.

“The Office of Economic Opportunity (OEO) is projecting Arizona employment to increase to 3,751,905 jobs in 2030 from 3,030,216 jobs in 2020,” the report said. “This represents growth of 721,689 jobs, or 2.2% annualized growth. By comparison, United States employment is projected to grow by 0.7% annually from 2020 to 2030.”

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Georgia-Based Christian Organization Gears Up to Fight Critical Race Theory for 2022 Legislative Session

Members of the Newnan-based Frontline Policy Action have announced their legislative priorities for the 2022 session of the Georgia General Assembly, and those policies including fighting what they call “radical indoctrination in the classroom.” Frontline Policy President Cole Muzio said he and members of his group want state legislators to ban Critical Race Theory (CRT) from local curriculums.

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Spotsylvania County School Board Passes Motion to Remove Sexually Explicit Material from Libraries

The Spotsylvania County School Board voted six to zero, with one member absent, to remove “sexually explicit” material from school libraries. During public comment in the Monday school board meeting, parent Christina Burruss called attention to content on school library web app Destiny Discover.

“My daughter is a freshman at Riverbend High School and it was just brought to my attention of the books they have online there for the children to read. I went on there by accident and found that the first page that all of the books were listed was broken down into mostly LGBTQIA related fiction stories,” Burruss said.

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Wisconsin Senator Johnson to Mayorkas: Crisis at Border Result of Failed Biden Policies

Wisconsin Senator Ron Johnson (R-WI) wrote a letter to Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Secretary Mayorkas demanding answers about Biden’s ‘failed policies’ at the border. Johnson wanted to know when the government was made aware of the surge of Haitian immigrants at the border and why they ignored that intelligence.

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Fight for Schools Files Recall Petition Against Loudoun School Board Chair Brenda Sheridan

Fight for Schools PAC Executive Director Ian Prior told the Loudoun County School Board on Tuesday that the group had submitted a new recall petition against Board Chair Brenda Sheridan. The new petition includes highlights from the months of controversy in the district.

“We told you this wasn’t about an election. And we’re still here. And we’re here with a petition for the removal of Chairwoman Sheridan. And it’s not the old petition. This is a new petition, drafted about two-and-a-half weeks ago, and we completed this in 13 days, over 1,200 signatures. And this petition has on it things like violating the first amendment rights of speakers and listeners in this board room. Remaining in the private Facebook group while people were plotting a disruption  at Leesburg Elementary to keep Tanner Cross on administrative leave. And doing nothing and allowing a now-convicted sexual offender to go into a different school where he then committed another alleged sexual assault,” Prior said.

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Tallahassee Businessman J.T. Burnette Sentenced to Three Years After Public Corruption Probe

Tallahassee businessman J.T. Burnette was sentenced to three years in prison earlier this week over public corruption charges. Burnette will also have to pay a $1.25 million fine.

He was found guilty on five charges including extortion and bribery during his trial in August.

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Chandler, Arizona Police Dodge Questions After Monitoring Concerned Parent Protestors

The Chandler Police Department (CPD) isn’t answering questions after leaked emails showed them colluding with employees of the Chander Unified School District (CUSD) to monitor parents who planned protests against mask mandates.

“Here are some sites for you to pass along to the Intel Unit and Lt. Salazar so whomever is coordinating and running this opp [sic] can continue to monitor and prepare for this [protest],” Sgt. Greg Howarth said in an email to fellow officers on May 27. 

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Infrastructure Bill Expected to Bring More Than $100B to Ohio Projects

Both Ohio U.S. senators praised the passage of President Joe Biden’s $1.2 trillion infrastructure bill that secured more than $100 billion for roads, bridges, airports and other projects around state.

The bipartisan infrastructure bill passed the U.S. House late Friday night, and one of the major projects on deck could be a new Brent Spence Bridge connecting Cincinnati to its northern Kentucky suburbs. Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear said the bill’s passage could allow for a new bridge to be built without the need for tolls.

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Michigan House Republicans Introduce Plan to Increase Financial Support for Law Enforcement

Republicans in the Michigan House of Representatives on Wednesday introduced a plan to increase financial resources for law enforcement, aiming to support and recruit local police officers.

Representatives Timmy Beson (R-Bangor Township) and Annette Glenn (R-Midland), members of the Appropriations committee, backed the use of remaining COVID-19 relief funds to back the measure.

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Gov. DeSantis Says Florida Got Shortchanged in Infrastructure Package

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis said Florida did not get a full share of cash from the recently passed trillion-dollar infrastructure package. He criticized the bill as a whole, but also noted that Florida might not be getting the same amount as other states.

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Criminal Defense Attorney Calls Demonstrators ‘Abusive’ Who Protested at Potter Judge’s Minneapolis Home

Cortez Rice

Minnesota criminal defense attorney Thomas Gallagher, with Gallagher Criminal Defense, told The Minnesota Sun that he believes that protesters who went to Judge Regina Chu’s apartment in the Loring Park neighborhood are being “abusive.” 

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Feds Charge Stonecrest, Georgia Mayor with COVID-19 Fraud

Federal officials have arraigned Stonecrest Mayor Jason Lary, on federal charges of wire fraud, conspiracy, and federal program theft related to the COVID-19 pandemic. This, according to a press release that the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Northern District of Georgia published Wednesday.

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Suspect in Slaying of Henry County Police Officer Found Dead with Self-Inflicted Gunshot Wound

The suspect in the death of Henry County officer Paramhans Desai, who was shot on Nov. 4 when he responded to domestic disturbance call in the town of McDonough, has taken his own life, according to Wednesday reports. 

After battling for four days, Desai succumbed to his gunshot wound Monday. 

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Minnesota Judge Reverses Decision in Kim Potter Trial Following Protest

Hennepin County Judge Regina Chu ruled Tuesday that cameras will be allowed in the courtroom in the upcoming trial of former Brooklyn Center police officer Kim Potter.

On Saturday, a mob of left-wing agitators protested outside of what they thought was this same judge’s home, angered by her August decision to prohibit news outlets from recording or livestreaming the court proceedings. Chu no longer lives in the condominium where protesters gathered, according to the Star Tribune.

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Stand for Tennessee PAC Fundraising Kick-Off Features Conservative Political Office Holders and Candidates

THOMPSON’S STATION, Tennessee — The kick-off fundraising event for the Stand for Tennessee Political Action Committee (PAC), held Tuesday evening at the Homestead Manor in Thompson’s Station, featured constitutional conservative political office holders and candidates.

Chairman of the PAC, Gary Humble told The Tennessee Star that approximately 325 people attended the event, which included a taco bar dinner, dessert and refreshments as well as live entertainment by Ben Calhoun.

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